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Ethel Merman

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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
When Rita McKenzie was growing up in the New Jersey suburbs of New York City, she equated Ethel Merman with the Statue of Liberty."She was sort of like a national treasure, at least to my generation. Yet we didn't pay too much attention to her," recalls Ms. McKenzie. "She was a fact of nature. You knew she was in every Broadway show. I thought to myself, 'Wow, she's kind of loud,' and went on . . . I wanted to be Julie Andrews."Unfortunately, Ms. McKenzie turned out to have Merman's voice.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Rose, the world's scariest stage mother, is at it again - pushing her supposedly never-aging offspring into any spotlight to perform pathetic song-and-dance numbers she concocts; scrimping and conniving to hold the act together from town to under-appreciative town; and, of course, hurling that immortal exhortation, “Sing out, Louise.” If you have never encountered the schlock and awe of Momma Rose, the central force of the classic Broadway musical...
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By DAN RODRICKS | January 5, 1998
I probably should have bowed out when the guy told me his aunt was Ethel Merman. I probably should haved laughed sardonically and said: "Look, pal, Ethel Merman was a large legend with a voice as big as Broadway. If she knew you were invoking her name to mooch a few bucks off some sucker in Baltimore, she'd rise from the dead and run you out of town."Alas, there's no business like this guilt business, and I just couldn't bring myself to tell the guy to kiss off.Aside from the dubious reference to a dead American vocalist, his story sounded pretty good.
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By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
Chill at Brewer's Art Get out of the heat and relax with a locally brewed beer at The Brewer's Art. While you sample one of the house libations -- maybe an "Ozzy" or a "Resurrection" -- try something from their long list of appetizers and entrees, as well. In addition to their European-style menu and specialty beers, the Mount Vernon night spot has an extensive selection of wine and scotch, making the location a perfect place for a casual happy hour or a special dinner for two. The Brewer's Art is at 1106 N. Charles St. For more information, call 410-547-6925.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
Chill at Brewer's Art Get out of the heat and relax with a locally brewed beer at The Brewer's Art. While you sample one of the house libations -- maybe an "Ozzy" or a "Resurrection" -- try something from their long list of appetizers and entrees, as well. In addition to their European-style menu and specialty beers, the Mount Vernon night spot has an extensive selection of wine and scotch, making the location a perfect place for a casual happy hour or a special dinner for two. The Brewer's Art is at 1106 N. Charles St. For more information, call 410-547-6925.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | November 18, 1997
AMC tonight offers viewers the chance to second-guess one of the legendary Hollywood moguls.Thanks to a relentless quest to make his studio's films shorter, 20th Century Fox head Darryl F. Zanuck saw to it that dozens of musical numbers were trimmed from such films as "Alexander's Ragtime Band" and "There's No Business Like Show Business." After all, what better way to shorten a musical than by simply cutting a number or two?Many of those deleted sequences have survived, however, and a dozen or so are featured in "Hidden Hollywood: Treasures From the 20th Century Fox Film Vaults" (8 p.m.-9 p.m.)
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By Howard Henry Chen and Howard Henry Chen,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1994
While most of us would rather detach ourselves from fake people and wooden personalities, Todd Stockman of Baltimore puts as many in his orbit as possible.He's not in the film industry. He's not in politics. He's not even in public relations. He can, however, be seen on the PBS "Square One TV" program that airs all this week at 5 p.m. on Maryland Public Television.Mr. Stockman is a ventriloquist, a man whose love for animating loose-lipped, swivel-headed puppets stretches back to when he was still a young boy."
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By Lou Cedrone | September 27, 1991
"THE FISHER King" plays, part of the time, as though it were shot in a revolving door. It also wanders all over the place and is perhaps too long for its own good, but if you stick with it (some people did walk out midway), you won't be sorry.You should, in fact, be extremely pleased that you remained with the film, remained long enough to come away with the impression that this is a bizarre, hilarious and very touching film.If one word can be used to describe it, it is sweet. Another is chaotic, but then it was directed by Terry Gilliam, former member of the Monty Python group, a man who has already established a reputation for doing different films ("Time Bandits," "Brazil," "Baron Munchausen")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Rose, the world's scariest stage mother, is at it again - pushing her supposedly never-aging offspring into any spotlight to perform pathetic song-and-dance numbers she concocts; scrimping and conniving to hold the act together from town to under-appreciative town; and, of course, hurling that immortal exhortation, “Sing out, Louise.” If you have never encountered the schlock and awe of Momma Rose, the central force of the classic Broadway musical...
NEWS
By Emma Brown, The Washington Post | April 22, 2010
Bernard Simon, who served for more than 20 years as public relations director for the Jewish humanitarian organization B'nai B'rith International, died April 20 at his home in Olney of complications from spinal stenosis. He was 89. Mr. Simon's death was confirmed by son David Simon, a former Baltimore Sun reporter and creator of the HBO TV series "The Wire" and "Treme." Early in his career, Bernard Simon was a freelance journalist who wrote for the Saturday Evening Post, Coronet magazine and the Toronto Star.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 5, 1998
I probably should have bowed out when the guy told me his aunt was Ethel Merman. I probably should haved laughed sardonically and said: "Look, pal, Ethel Merman was a large legend with a voice as big as Broadway. If she knew you were invoking her name to mooch a few bucks off some sucker in Baltimore, she'd rise from the dead and run you out of town."Alas, there's no business like this guilt business, and I just couldn't bring myself to tell the guy to kiss off.Aside from the dubious reference to a dead American vocalist, his story sounded pretty good.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 18, 1997
AMC tonight offers viewers the chance to second-guess one of the legendary Hollywood moguls.Thanks to a relentless quest to make his studio's films shorter, 20th Century Fox head Darryl F. Zanuck saw to it that dozens of musical numbers were trimmed from such films as "Alexander's Ragtime Band" and "There's No Business Like Show Business." After all, what better way to shorten a musical than by simply cutting a number or two?Many of those deleted sequences have survived, however, and a dozen or so are featured in "Hidden Hollywood: Treasures From the 20th Century Fox Film Vaults" (8 p.m.-9 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Howard Henry Chen and Howard Henry Chen,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1994
While most of us would rather detach ourselves from fake people and wooden personalities, Todd Stockman of Baltimore puts as many in his orbit as possible.He's not in the film industry. He's not in politics. He's not even in public relations. He can, however, be seen on the PBS "Square One TV" program that airs all this week at 5 p.m. on Maryland Public Television.Mr. Stockman is a ventriloquist, a man whose love for animating loose-lipped, swivel-headed puppets stretches back to when he was still a young boy."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
When Rita McKenzie was growing up in the New Jersey suburbs of New York City, she equated Ethel Merman with the Statue of Liberty."She was sort of like a national treasure, at least to my generation. Yet we didn't pay too much attention to her," recalls Ms. McKenzie. "She was a fact of nature. You knew she was in every Broadway show. I thought to myself, 'Wow, she's kind of loud,' and went on . . . I wanted to be Julie Andrews."Unfortunately, Ms. McKenzie turned out to have Merman's voice.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 27, 1991
"THE FISHER King" plays, part of the time, as though it were shot in a revolving door. It also wanders all over the place and is perhaps too long for its own good, but if you stick with it (some people did walk out midway), you won't be sorry.You should, in fact, be extremely pleased that you remained with the film, remained long enough to come away with the impression that this is a bizarre, hilarious and very touching film.If one word can be used to describe it, it is sweet. Another is chaotic, but then it was directed by Terry Gilliam, former member of the Monty Python group, a man who has already established a reputation for doing different films ("Time Bandits," "Brazil," "Baron Munchausen")
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 26, 2000
`Forbidden Broadway': shaking up show biz Where else can you see the late, great Ethel Merman give the Phantom tips about singing without a microphone? Or hear John Davidson warble "Oh, what a beautiful moron"? This must be "Forbidden Broadway," and it's coming to the Gordon Center for Performing Arts this weekend. The latest installment of creator/director Gerard Alessandrini's long-running New York revue is titled "Forbidden Broadway Cleans Up Its Act," and it promises to skewer 31 Broadway shows in 97 minutes.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1997
Clarifications to the Legend of Mama Cass Elliot:No. 1. Mama Cass Elliot did not die choking on a ham sandwich.No. 2. Mama Cass Elliot was hit on the head by a pipe, but it did not have the effect, as the Mamas and Papas repeated ad infinitum, of expanding her vocal range.No. 3. When Mama Cass Elliot was a sophomore, she didn't plan to go to Swarthmore, as the lyrics to "Creeque Alley" claim. Goucher was a more likely choice, but it didn't rhyme.No. 4. Mama Cass Elliot's daughter was not immaculately conceived as Mama Cass Elliot announced.
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