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Ethanol

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NEWS
September 8, 2011
Sen. Ben Cardin and Karen Hostler are right in saying we do not need ethanol as a gasoline additive, while Stephanie Dreyer is a spin artist in her response to their comments ("Ethanol makes sense," Sept. 1). While not entirely inaccurate, the omissions in her arguments are significant. For example, Ms. Dreyer expertly avoids mentioning that ethanol is produced by burning carbon fuels and that studies have shown only marginal energy savings in ethanol use over gasoline. Ethanol also results in lower gas mileage compared to traditional gasoline.
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NEWS
By Reid Detchon | September 11, 2013
Oil is essential to our economic and national security because our transportation system runs on it. The danger of this monopoly is that consumers must pay whatever price is charged for gasoline or diesel. The danger to our nation is that our foreign policy and military strategy are hostage to the need to protect oil supplies in the Middle East. The only way out of this box is to give consumers something new — a choice in fuels. The most powerful step that Washington has ever taken toward energy independence — the goal of half a dozen presidents, including George H.W. Bush, for whom I served in the Energy Department — was a 2007 law that put us on a path toward a competitive transportation fuel market through the production and consumption of renewable fuel in America.
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NEWS
August 31, 2012
Thanks to Charles Campbell for his very enlightening commentary about the huge international costs resulting from our national ethanol mandates in gasoline, resulting in dire increases in food costs worldwide ("U.S. must abandon corn-based ethanol," Aug. 29). Looking closer to home, in addition to grocery costs, ask any waterman or boater on the Chesapeake Bay or elsewhere and you'll hear of the extremely common mechanical breakdown of marine engines due to the fact that ethanol absorbs water which then corrodes the fuel system from the inside.
NEWS
By Mike Brown | May 26, 2013
Whether you're barbecuing in Baltimore, in Bel Air or on the bay this Memorial Day, you will pay more for staple foods because our federal government continues to pit food versus fuel. Thanks to an unworkable federal energy policy, prices for animal feed have soared, burdening those farmers and ranchers that raise livestock and poultry, along with the companies that process them, with rising production costs. In addition to forcing farms and food producers to cut jobs or close their doors, the increased costs are reflected in the expanding grocery bills of every American.
NEWS
September 24, 2012
If Ernie Shea is right and ethanol is still the answer, he is wrong if he believes that corn-based ethanol is the right answer ("Ethanol still the answer," Sept. 21). I have no problem with the Renewable Fuel Standard passed by Congress. I do have a problem with producing ethanol from corn. Sugar cane is a better source, but our tariffs on sugar and our embargo on Cuban products keep us from making ethanol for less. There may be other better sources than corn. By the way, my gas may be less expensive with ethanol, but I also get fewer miles per gallon.
NEWS
August 28, 2012
The use of ethanol in gasoline has a long and sordid history ("Food or fuel?" Aug. 3). By the early 1990s, EPA regulations had reduced tailpipe emissions from new cars by over 95 percent of 970s levels, and only about 3 percent of the hydrocarbons in the atmosphere were from automobile exhausts. Nevertheless the government legislated the use of reformulated gasolines containing oxygen to facilitate complete combustion. This lead to the inclusion of MTBE in gasolines. After oil companies spent tens of billions of dollars to build government-mandated MTBE plants, ground water contamination from leaking fuel storage tanks forced the government to abandon MTBE and replace it with ethanol.
BUSINESS
By Christian Science Monitor | April 18, 1994
The Environmental Protection Agency will make a decision soon that will ripen or wither the ethanol industry indefinitely."The stakes here are considerable," says John Urbanchuk, vice president of AUS Consultants in suburban Philadelphia.Under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, a new formula of gasoline containing more oxygen must be sold in the nine smoggiest cities in the United States, beginning in January. These are Los Angeles, New York, Houston, Baltimore, Chicago, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, San Diego and Hartford, Conn.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 30, 2007
NEVADA, Iowa -- The ethanol boom of recent years - which spurred a frenzy of distillery construction, record corn prices, rising food prices and hopes of a new future for rural America - may be fading. Only last year, farmers here spoke of a biofuel gold rush, and they rejoiced as prices for ethanol and the corn used to produce it set records. But companies and farm cooperatives have built so many distilleries so quickly that the ethanol market is suddenly suffering from a glut, in part because the means to distribute it has not kept pace.
NEWS
By Greg Burns and Greg Burns,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 23, 2006
OSCO, Ill. -- Gary Asay raises thousands of hogs in this small town near the Mississippi River, and for years he's had nothing much around him but farmland stretching in every direction. Now an ethanol plant will be opening just 25 miles to the south in Galva. Another is coming to Annawan, about 25 miles to the east, and another just 30 miles across the river in Buffalo, Iowa. The town of Fulton, 44 miles to the north, will be getting a big one, too, leaving Asay to wonder if all those factories amount to too much too soon: "Anyone who has looked into it is concerned," he says.
NEWS
By HAROLD KUNG | July 2, 2006
More and more leaders outside of environmental circles are looking to the nation's cornfields these days to solve the United States' energy problems. The growing interest in ethanol, a clean, corn-based renewable resource, has paralleled the escalating price of gas and the urgent need to break the country's dependence on crude oil. Recently, the Big Three automobile manufacturers appealed to Congress for incentives to increase the number of gas stations that offer blends of ethanol. They also endorsed a plan to meet 25 percent of the nation's transportation fuel needs with corn ethanol by 2025.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2012
The nation's leading travel organization Friday urged the Obama administration to block the sale of E15, a new ethanol-laced gasoline, that could damage as many as 228 million vehicles that are not designed to run on it. After years of controversy, the Environmental Protection Agency in June approved the sale of E15, a blend that contains up to 15 percent corn-based ethanol, for cars made after 2001. But AAA said its survey shows that 95 percent of consumers were unaware of E15 and the potential that it could damage engines and void warranties.
NEWS
September 24, 2012
If Ernie Shea is right and ethanol is still the answer, he is wrong if he believes that corn-based ethanol is the right answer ("Ethanol still the answer," Sept. 21). I have no problem with the Renewable Fuel Standard passed by Congress. I do have a problem with producing ethanol from corn. Sugar cane is a better source, but our tariffs on sugar and our embargo on Cuban products keep us from making ethanol for less. There may be other better sources than corn. By the way, my gas may be less expensive with ethanol, but I also get fewer miles per gallon.
NEWS
By Ernie Shea | September 20, 2012
Corn prices have reached record highs as a result of this summer's devastating drought, and it hasn't taken long for some to use the crisis as leverage for their own political agendas - namely, the opposition to domestic renewable fuel. The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), which requires that a certain portion of America's fuel come from homegrown, renewable sources, is under attack. The standard passed Congress with bipartisan support in 2007 in order to reduce foreign oil imports, create jobs and lower the cost of gasoline.
NEWS
September 9, 2012
My recent letter of questioning the use of corn to produce ethanol prompted the expected rebuttal from the Renewable Fuels Association ("U.S. must abandon corn-based ethanol," Aug. 28). That, however, doesn't change the fact that corn ethanol only survives because of an Environmental Protection Agency mandate to boost American corn ethanol production through subsidies, tax credits and import duties on sugar cane-based ethanol from Brazil. Ranchers in the U.S. are slaughtering cattle at record rates because of corn shortages that have resulted from the drought and from ethanol production.
NEWS
September 1, 2012
Charles Campbell's letter ("U.S. must abandon corn-based ethanol," Aug. 29) blames American biofuels for everything from air pollution to malnutrition. But the facts tell a very different story. Far from having no impact on air pollution or actually contributing to it (and Mr. Campbell makes both claims), greenhouse gas emissions from ethanol are "... equivalent to a 48 percent to 59 percent reduction compared to gasoline, a twofold to threefold greater reduction than reported in previous studies," according to a study published by Yale University's Journal of Industrial Ecology.
NEWS
August 31, 2012
Thanks to Charles Campbell for his very enlightening commentary about the huge international costs resulting from our national ethanol mandates in gasoline, resulting in dire increases in food costs worldwide ("U.S. must abandon corn-based ethanol," Aug. 29). Looking closer to home, in addition to grocery costs, ask any waterman or boater on the Chesapeake Bay or elsewhere and you'll hear of the extremely common mechanical breakdown of marine engines due to the fact that ethanol absorbs water which then corrodes the fuel system from the inside.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | July 9, 2006
The debate over whether gasoline suppliers should replace MTBE with ethanol did not cause a lot of waves in the boating community, but the issue is affecting recreational vessels in ways that have not been widely appreciated, according to boating advocacy groups. Suppliers traditionally have added MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) to gasoline so it would burn more cleanly. But the additive has leaked into ground water supplies in Maryland and other states, raising health concerns. Many gasoline suppliers, under pressure from state legislatures and facing lawsuits (including one in Maryland)
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 3, 2008
Hershey Co. will boost wholesale chocolate prices for the second time in a year, the company said a few days ago. On average, prices charged to retailers will go up 13 percent on about a third of the Pennsylvania-based company's products. Hershey blamed higher prices for raw materials (cocoa beans and milk), electricity, shipping and other expenses. This is classic pass-along inflation. Input costs are up, so end-users have to pay more, too. It's affecting numerous other kinds of goods and services, but chocolate producers and consumers are presented with an especially bitter cup. In April Hershey raised prices on the same items 4 percent to 5 percent, the Associated Press reported.
NEWS
August 28, 2012
The use of ethanol in gasoline has a long and sordid history ("Food or fuel?" Aug. 3). By the early 1990s, EPA regulations had reduced tailpipe emissions from new cars by over 95 percent of 970s levels, and only about 3 percent of the hydrocarbons in the atmosphere were from automobile exhausts. Nevertheless the government legislated the use of reformulated gasolines containing oxygen to facilitate complete combustion. This lead to the inclusion of MTBE in gasolines. After oil companies spent tens of billions of dollars to build government-mandated MTBE plants, ground water contamination from leaking fuel storage tanks forced the government to abandon MTBE and replace it with ethanol.
NEWS
By Dave Juday | August 26, 2012
This year's drought, along with recent news reports of the lowest corn yield in 17 years, has rekindled the food vs. fuel debate - and, for good reasons. When Congress passed the Energy Independence and Security Act in 2007, an ambitious schedule for incorporating ethanol into the nation's fuel supply known as the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) was established. Though ethanol was sold as a way to make our energy supply more secure, little consideration was given to what every farmer knows: Mother Nature can be fickle, as this year's drought proves.
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