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By Laura Demanski and By Laura Demanski,Special to the Sun | July 21, 2002
Ash Wednesday, by Ethan Hawke. Alfred A. Knopf. 220 pages. $22.95. Some novels sprawl ambitiously over the whole social fabric, others nestle within a single consciousness. The latter kind, focusing inward after a fashion perfected a hundred years ago by Henry James, takes the individual interior life as a favored site for exploration, a vast microcosmos rife with curiosities and prone to interesting revolutions. This is the type of novel that Ethan Hawke has written in his earnest, searching Ash Wednesday, where he attempts to trace the workings of a quiet transformation within an ordinary man. Trying to get inside a different person's skin and show the world from his point of view is a fitting artistic choice for someone whose primary work is acting -- which might be seen as the art of getting someone else inside one's own skin.
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By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers | January 8, 2010
Everything that's good about "Daybreakers" bursts forth in the scene wherein a hematologist played by Ethan Hawke undertakes an experiment and injects a not-quite-FDA-approved synthetic liquid into the veins of a fellow vampire, under the watchful eye of a pharmaceutical magnate played by Sam Neill. From the scene's relative placement early in the story, and the familiarity of its premise, it's clear the operation will fail in the most spectacular way possible. The setup goes back a lot further than "Independence Day" or "The Thing" (either version)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 18, 1991
'White Fang'Starring Ethan Hawke.Directed by Randal Kleiser.Released by Disney.Rated PG.** 1/2 You know you're in Walt Disney's "White Fang" and not Jack London's in the first seven seconds when a pack of frantic wolves, lips curled like black waves, teeth dense as a thicket of bayonets, closes on a bunny and the strongest of them manages to get off with the prize which upon examination in close -up has been magically transmogrified into a generic fur...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,Tribune newspapers | January 7, 2010
No actor wants to look foolish, especially if there are a couple of Oscar nominations and a Tony nomination on his resume. And the time you worry about that, says Ethan Hawke, is "when you're sitting there, covered in fake blood, or somebody's handing you a bottle of blood that they're treating like a vintage wine." Whatever the requirements of the scene, which had him wearing fangs and playing a vampire hematologist, Hawke couldn't help having his moment of doubt. " 'God, I hope this movie's good,' I'm thinking.
FEATURES
November 2, 2007
Next Friday BEFORE THE DEVIL KNOWS YOU'RE DEAD -- (THINKFilm) Brothers (Philip Seymour Hoffman and Ethan Hawke) decide to rob their parents' jewelry store. CHRISTMAS IN WONDERLAND -- (Yari Fim Group) Two kids from Los Angeles move to Canada, help solve a crime and discover something interesting about Santa Claus. With Patrick Swayze, Tim Curry and Carmen Electra. FRED CLAUS -- (Warner Bros.) Fred Claus (Vince Vaughn), Santa's bitter older brother, is forced to move to the North Pole.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers | January 8, 2010
Everything that's good about "Daybreakers" bursts forth in the scene wherein a hematologist played by Ethan Hawke undertakes an experiment and injects a not-quite-FDA-approved synthetic liquid into the veins of a fellow vampire, under the watchful eye of a pharmaceutical magnate played by Sam Neill. From the scene's relative placement early in the story, and the familiarity of its premise, it's clear the operation will fail in the most spectacular way possible. The setup goes back a lot further than "Independence Day" or "The Thing" (either version)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 7, 2000
By the end of two hours that feel more like three, filmgoers may come up with a new name for the calcified un-film they've just seen: "Snow Falling on Cedarzzzzzz." The armature around which "Snow Falling on Cedars" turns -- very, very slowly -- is the mysterious death of a fisherman off San Piedro Island, north of Puget Sound. It's the early 1950s, when memories of World War II are still fresh in Americans' minds, so it's no surprise that the police pick up Kazuo Miyanmoto, one of the many Americans of Japanese descent who live on the island, for murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | August 16, 1991
The title of "Mystery Date" pretty much says it. On their firs date, two nice kids are embroiled in an increasingly alarming mystery.Tom McHugh (Ethan Hawke, "Dead Poets Society's" sensitive one) is obsessed with the pretty girl down the block, Geena Matthews (Teri Polo), but too timid to approach her. When his "perfect" older brother, Craig (Brian McNamara), pays an unannounced home visit from Stanford Law School, he sets up (( twerpy Tom with Geena in record time.Craig lends his own trendy jacket and plastic-filled wallet to his little brother.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 19, 2004
Taking Lives, the serial-killer thriller of the week, should have gotten a life of its own instead of trying to steal it from Michael Pye's novel of the same name and several other movies. What Pye had was the concept of a murderer who life-jacks his victims, assuming their identities before moving on. What the moviemakers have done is unsuccessfully life-jack other novels and movies ranging from Thomas Harris' Hannibal Lechter-Clarice Starling thrillers to Seven. They've added a female FBI profiler, Illeana Scott (Angelina Jolie)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 19, 2005
There ought to be a law limiting how much hooey a movie serves up. Assault on Precinct 13 asks you to believe that one bad guy can kill another with a pen to the neck during Mass without anyone noticing; that cops would chase someone into a church, guns blazing, also in the middle of Mass; that a rogue SWAT team can attack a downtown building, guns still blazing, without anyone, not even local news crews, noticing; that 75-year-old Tommy guns still sit,...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 25, 2009
Precious . . (4 STARS) The biggest surprise of 2009 was this electrically compassionate look at an abused young woman (Gabourey Sidibe) and her escape from the control of a horrifying mother (Mo'Nique). These two create an extraordinary dance of simmering rebellion and sadistic manipulation. But the whole ensemble is aces, including Mariah Carrey as a responsible, no-nonsense social worker and Paula Patton as a dedicated teacher. Under Lee Daniels' direction, you can't look away for a nanosecond.
FEATURES
November 2, 2007
Next Friday BEFORE THE DEVIL KNOWS YOU'RE DEAD -- (THINKFilm) Brothers (Philip Seymour Hoffman and Ethan Hawke) decide to rob their parents' jewelry store. CHRISTMAS IN WONDERLAND -- (Yari Fim Group) Two kids from Los Angeles move to Canada, help solve a crime and discover something interesting about Santa Claus. With Patrick Swayze, Tim Curry and Carmen Electra. FRED CLAUS -- (Warner Bros.) Fred Claus (Vince Vaughn), Santa's bitter older brother, is forced to move to the North Pole.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 19, 2005
There ought to be a law limiting how much hooey a movie serves up. Assault on Precinct 13 asks you to believe that one bad guy can kill another with a pen to the neck during Mass without anyone noticing; that cops would chase someone into a church, guns blazing, also in the middle of Mass; that a rogue SWAT team can attack a downtown building, guns still blazing, without anyone, not even local news crews, noticing; that 75-year-old Tommy guns still sit,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 18, 2004
A slow flirtation with a steady burn": that's what movie-maker Richard Linklater was after when he planned Before Sunset as an 80-minute amble through Paris with an American and a Frenchwoman. The man is a novelist named Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and the woman is Celine (Julie Delpy), who inspired his new book with a life-altering one-night stand nine years before in Vienna (as chronicled in Linklater's 1995 film, Before Sunrise). They were supposed to meet in Vienna again, six months after their first tryst.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Russell and Tess Russell,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
Big-budget sequels are usually the bread and butter of the summer movie season (see: Shrek 2 and Spider-Man 2). So it's surprising that one of the most anticipated follow-ups of the season made less than $2 million in its first incarnation. Richard Linklater's 1995 romance Before Sunrise, beloved by cinephiles and critics but not a box-office smash, relates the chance encounter of two strangers, Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Deply), who share an amazing night in Vienna. The film's second installment, Before Sunset (opening tomorrow in Baltimore)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 19, 2004
Taking Lives, the serial-killer thriller of the week, should have gotten a life of its own instead of trying to steal it from Michael Pye's novel of the same name and several other movies. What Pye had was the concept of a murderer who life-jacks his victims, assuming their identities before moving on. What the moviemakers have done is unsuccessfully life-jack other novels and movies ranging from Thomas Harris' Hannibal Lechter-Clarice Starling thrillers to Seven. They've added a female FBI profiler, Illeana Scott (Angelina Jolie)
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | January 22, 1991
''White Fang,'' said to be ''the first full-length motion picture to be filmed entirely on location in Alaska,'' has a lot going for it, the locale, for one. It also includes some spectacular animal footage and several very engaging performances.Another nice thing about it is that it doesn't give the villains too much screen time. They are disposed of in record time, and that's always a blessing. This sort of thing can become tiresome.''White Fang,'' directed by Randall Kleiser, is based on the book written by Jack London.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 25, 2009
Precious . . (4 STARS) The biggest surprise of 2009 was this electrically compassionate look at an abused young woman (Gabourey Sidibe) and her escape from the control of a horrifying mother (Mo'Nique). These two create an extraordinary dance of simmering rebellion and sadistic manipulation. But the whole ensemble is aces, including Mariah Carrey as a responsible, no-nonsense social worker and Paula Patton as a dedicated teacher. Under Lee Daniels' direction, you can't look away for a nanosecond.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Demanski and By Laura Demanski,Special to the Sun | July 21, 2002
Ash Wednesday, by Ethan Hawke. Alfred A. Knopf. 220 pages. $22.95. Some novels sprawl ambitiously over the whole social fabric, others nestle within a single consciousness. The latter kind, focusing inward after a fashion perfected a hundred years ago by Henry James, takes the individual interior life as a favored site for exploration, a vast microcosmos rife with curiosities and prone to interesting revolutions. This is the type of novel that Ethan Hawke has written in his earnest, searching Ash Wednesday, where he attempts to trace the workings of a quiet transformation within an ordinary man. Trying to get inside a different person's skin and show the world from his point of view is a fitting artistic choice for someone whose primary work is acting -- which might be seen as the art of getting someone else inside one's own skin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
TORONTO -- "I've been blessed," Denzel Washington says during the recent Toronto International Film Festival. "I'm in a great position. I make tons of money." There's a "but" there, and we'll get to that. It might be instructive to first give context to Washington's role in Training Day, which had its premiere at the festival and opens in theaters on Oct. 5. The man who won an Academy Award in 1989 for his soldier in Glory, who imbued righteous indignation with sweat and muscle in The Hurricane and who rallied his divided team in Remember the Titans is taking a turn toward evil.
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