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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1994
Andy Etchebarren calls them "my kids," a group of young men mostly between 19 and 21 who have made it to the lowest rung of the Orioles' farm system, the Rookie level. They travel by bus, they make $950 a month, they are eager to learn.Their guru is Etchebarren, the former Orioles catcher now in his second year as manager of the Bluefield (W.Va.) Orioles."If you're not at the big-league level, this is the level to be at," Etchebarren, 51, says.He likes the relatively short 68-game season and the fact that the longest bus ride on the West Virginia-Virginia-Tennessee Appalachian League circuit is only about three hours.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Catcher Matt Wieters doesn't show much emotion on the field. He's Baltimore's Matty Ice. So it was interesting to see him show some not just once, but twice, in the late innings on Thursday night. The first was fairly understated. He fist-pumped after throwing out Desmond Jennings, who was attempting to steal in the ninth. Wieters has now thrown out 7 of 9 would-be basestealers this year. The other one was a lot more obvious - Wieters bat-flipped after hitting his walkoff grand slam in the 10th.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
As Orioles manager Ray Miller waits for longtime Dominican scout Carlos Bernhardt to be added to his staff, the club's former bench coach has resurfaced in the lower level of the minor-league system.Andy Etchebarren has been appointed manager at Bluefield, the Orioles' rookie-league team in the Appalachian League. It's the same position he held for three seasons before joining former Orioles manager Davey Johnson's staff two years ago.Etchebarren and first base coach John Stearns weren't retained by Miller, who was named manager after Johnson's resignation.
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By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
Forty-six years later, the photograph still gives people goose bumps. There's Dave McNally, Baltimore's "other" No. 19, the triumphant pitcher whose grin is as wide as his native Montana. And Andy Etchebarren, the catcher who's poised to embrace him, mask still on and mitt in hand. And there, on the left, is a jubilant Brooks Robinson, or at least a chunk of him: the Orioles' third baseman is airborne and looks as if he parachuted into Memorial Stadium. Why? The Birds had just swept the 1966 World Series in four straight games.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2007
The Orioles on Monday fired Single-A Aberdeen manager Andy Etchebarren, who had coached or managed in the organization for the past 15 seasons after a successful playing career with the club. Etchebarren managed the IronBirds for three seasons, compiling a 102-124 record. Etchebarren, who has managed in the Orioles system at every level, is the fourth minor league coach or manager the Orioles have let go in the past couple of months. Minor league pitching coordinator Doc Watson, roving infield and base-running instructor Tom Lawless and Double-A Bowie manager Bien Figueroa also were not retained.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1999
If you want a spectacular rise through the Orioles' farm system, see pitchers Rocky Coppinger and Matt Riley.If you want a steady ascent toward the major leagues, see catcher Jayson Werth.The Orioles didn't have much fortune in the 1999 summer draft with finding catchers, but they didn't really need it because of talents such as Werth, their No. 1 pick two years ago who is making notable progress."He's getting better," said Single-A Frederick Keys manager Andy Etchebarren, the last player to come through the Orioles' chain and become the longtime starting catcher in Baltimore.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2002
A difficult season for pitcher Josh Towers has taken an ugly turn. The Orioles must decide where it leads him. Triple-A Rochester manager Andy Etchebarren said he fined Towers after Saturday's game for flipping him the ball on the mound upon being removed in the fourth inning. Towers stormed to the dugout after giving up a two-run double to Charlotte's Joe Borchard, and was confronted again by Etchebarren. "He showed me up, and he showed his team up," Etchebarren told the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2000
Though the Orioles aren't searching for a new manager this fall, having found stability with last November's hiring of Mike Hargrove, they're expected to make changes at the top three levels of their minor-league system. No official announcement has come from the front office, but the Orioles apparently will move up Andy Etchebarren from Double-A Bowie to Triple-A Rochester and Dave Machemer from Single-A Frederick to Bowie. Dave Cash, a coach at Rochester the past four years, is expected to manage at Frederick, and Joe Ferguson returns to Single-A Delmarva after leading the Shorebirds to the South Atlantic League championship in his first season.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2000
Forget the thought about one of the Orioles' prime prospects moving to the outfield. Jayson Werth is a catcher, period. "Don't even think about a shift," said his manager at Bowie and current catching mentor, Andy Etchebarren. "No one has given up on him becoming a big-league catcher. I don't ever think he'll throw to second in 1.9 [seconds). But he'll be around 2.0 and that's good enough if he 's accurate with his throws." Said Werth: "A catcher is what I've always wanted to be. If I keep on progressing, I should be able to do it. I've only played in the outfield seven games in my whole life.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
In last month's amateur baseball draft, the Orioles chose two catchers in the first 14 rounds. One came out of Oklahoma City, the other Hawaii. Both of them played in college. If history is a good indicator, neither of them will have a significant impact on the major league roster - or get anywhere near it. The long odds that have become an industry-wide issue stretch more than 40 years in Baltimore. Andy Etchebarren, drafted out of high school in 1961, spent 11 1/2 of his 15 seasons with the Orioles.
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By From Sun staff and news services | August 13, 2009
Minor league baseball Blue Crabs' Etchebarren named manager of Revolution Southern Maryland Blue Crabs hitting coach Andy Etchebarren was named manager of the Atlantic League rival York Revolution on Wednesday. Etchebarren, a former Orioles player, coach and minor league manager, will make his debut for the Revolution on Friday night. Chris Hoiles, resigned as York manager Aug. 5. Etchebarren will finish the remainder of the season and continue as manager in 2010. Sam Snider, who had been interim manager, will return to his role as hitting coach.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2007
The Orioles on Monday fired Single-A Aberdeen manager Andy Etchebarren, who had coached or managed in the organization for the past 15 seasons after a successful playing career with the club. Etchebarren managed the IronBirds for three seasons, compiling a 102-124 record. Etchebarren, who has managed in the Orioles system at every level, is the fourth minor league coach or manager the Orioles have let go in the past couple of months. Minor league pitching coordinator Doc Watson, roving infield and base-running instructor Tom Lawless and Double-A Bowie manager Bien Figueroa also were not retained.
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By ROCH KUBATKO | February 28, 2007
Once he's done serving as a spring training coach, Andy Etchebarren will work as the Orioles' minor league roving catching instructor before beginning his second year as manager at short-season Single-A Aberdeen. The IronBirds are the fifth Orioles affiliate he's managed. The starting catcher on the 1966 World Series team, Etchebarren also was Davey Johnson's bench coach in 1996 and 1997. What's been the toughest job you've had with the Orioles? -- Managing Triple-A [Rochester]. That's a situation where you call a guy up and then you have two or three guys upset because they have better stats and they thought they should go. And then the guy that comes down, he's upset.
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By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | July 17, 2006
You can't start a professional baseball career much better than Orioles first-base prospect Chris Vinyard has. Vinyard is batting .344 with three homers, 20 RBIs and 11 doubles for Single-A Aberdeen. He leads the team in virtually every offensive category. And that's after a recent slump. "I couldn't ask for anything better right now," he said. Vinyard, 20, was not among the club's high-profile draftees of recent years. The Orioles picked him in the 38th round out of Chandler-Gilbert Community College in 2005 and then followed his progress for a year to see if they wanted to sign him. He blistered junior college pitching this spring.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
In last month's amateur baseball draft, the Orioles chose two catchers in the first 14 rounds. One came out of Oklahoma City, the other Hawaii. Both of them played in college. If history is a good indicator, neither of them will have a significant impact on the major league roster - or get anywhere near it. The long odds that have become an industry-wide issue stretch more than 40 years in Baltimore. Andy Etchebarren, drafted out of high school in 1961, spent 11 1/2 of his 15 seasons with the Orioles.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2002
Dave McNally was remembered by former Orioles teammates yesterday as an unyielding competitor who was stoic and focused on the field, but easygoing and friendly away from it. McNally, a four-time 20-game winner and the first pitcher inducted into the club's Hall of Fame, died of cancer late Sunday night in Billings, Mont., at age 60. "He was one tough pitcher," former Orioles third baseman Brooks Robinson said from Florida. "If there was one guy you wanted to get three outs in the bottom of the ninth, it was him."
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By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Evening Sun Staff | August 8, 1991
Nostalgia will run rampant for four members of the Milwaukee Brewers tonight.Former Orioles all, Brewers coaches Andy Etchebarren, Don Baylor and Larry Haney and catcher Rick Dempsey will make their final appearances at Memorial Stadium when Milwaukee and the Orioles wrap up the Baltimore phase of their 1991 rivalry.Memories? They come tumbling back.Etchebarren was the catcher in the Orioles' 1966 World Series sweep of the Dodgers. The famous photo of Etchebarren and pitcher Dave McNally about to embrace a joyful, leaping Brooks Robinson after the final out today occupies a prominent spot on Etchebarren's den wall.
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By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2000
Bowie manager Andy Etchebarren says until last month he had seen only two minor-league players he considered "can't-miss" prospects in five years with the Orioles' player development system. The two were Atlanta Braves center fielder Andruw Jones and Braves infielder Rafael Furcal. Add Ed Rogers to that list, says Etchebarren. Rogers is 18, a native of the Dominican Republic and a smooth-fielding shortstop with an explosive bat - a combination previously unseen within the Orioles' minor-league system.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
Andy Etchebarren could hardly wait to dial the phone. As manager at Triple-A Rochester, he had seen several players come and go, but few had made an impression like Howie Clark, and now Clark was heading to the big leagues, after 11 long years. The call came right as Clark was leaving for lunch, and after getting told he was heading to Oriole Park, Clark said, "Etch, don't kid me." "I would never kid you," Etchebarren said, "about something like this." So Clark, 28, went to Frontier Field and packed his bags for Baltimore.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2002
A difficult season for pitcher Josh Towers has taken an ugly turn. The Orioles must decide where it leads him. Triple-A Rochester manager Andy Etchebarren said he fined Towers after Saturday's game for flipping him the ball on the mound upon being removed in the fourth inning. Towers stormed to the dugout after giving up a two-run double to Charlotte's Joe Borchard, and was confronted again by Etchebarren. "He showed me up, and he showed his team up," Etchebarren told the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.
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