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NEWS
By Gilbert M. Gaul and Anthony R. Wood and Gilbert M. Gaul and Anthony R. Wood,knight-ridder/tribune | May 21, 2000
BERKELEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. -- Chris Smith and David Friedland are poking holes in the perfectly manicured lawn of Constantine Afansief's home 10 miles west of Barnegat Bay, in Ocean County, N.J. Row upon row of compact new homes line the street. Each was carved out of uplands once thick with pine trees and hardwoods. After the trees were ripped out, the topsoil was scraped and covered with sod. To the untrained eye, the lawn appears perfect. Yet when Smith tries to force a slim metal rod into the grass, to measure its ability to drain, the rod resists after an inch or two. "The soil is really compact here," says Smith, a soil scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
SPOILER ALERT: This story reveals features of the plot. Baltimore-born film director Barry Levinson has said his new eco-horror movie, "The Bay," about a Chesapeake Bay turned deadly by environmental abuse, is "80 percent factual. " Bay scientists and one activist who've seen it say the film, which opened Friday, does touch on some very real issues affecting the bay. But they say the artistic license taken with the facts and the gore that makes it a horror movie may overwhelm any back story about what's wrong with the Chesapeake.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
A Baltimore startup said Thursday that it received a $100,000 investment from the Maryland Technology Development Corp. An Estuary LLC, which builds web and mobile social platforms for "next generation" professional development, said the money will support its technology development efforts. TEDCO is a quasi-state agency that invests in Maryland startups. The eight-month-old An Estuary - started by educators - has a tech platform in beta testing for teachers. It's based at Baltimore's Emerging Technology Center @ Johns Hopkins Eastern, a business incubator.
FEATURES
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
More than 70 percent of the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams are falling short of water quality goals, according to a report released Tuesday. The "Bay Barometer" report is issued annually by the Chesapeake Bay Program, the federal-state partnership that oversees restoration efforts for the bay. This year's report includes a new category that combines water quality readings such as dissolved oxygen and clarity. The bay and its tributaries are broken into 291 sections, of which only 29 percent had an adequate score.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2002
A day after a California company withdrew plans to bury more than 300 miles of fiber-optic cable under the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries, Gov. Parris N. Glendening effectively quashed any approval of the plan during the remainder of his term. In a pointed letter to state and federal regulators yesterday, Glendening said the plan would set an "unacceptable precedent" and told officials of the Maryland Department of the Environment and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that Clear- Stream Communications Inc. of Sacramento should consider other options.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
IT'S often said, and true, that even the best efforts to repair Chesapeake Bay can never restore the place as it was when Capt. John Smith first explored and charted it in 1607. Indeed, Smith's words, "Heaven and earth never agreed better to frame a place for man's habitation," have come almost to haunt us. Human inhabitation of the bay's six-state watershed grew to about 8 million between 1607 and 1950, then nearly doubled, to 15.7 million during the past 50 years. About a million more each decade are projected to swell the ranks.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2002
Popular Annapolis disc jockey Michael A. Buckley set out three years ago to do a weekly radio show on the Chesapeake Bay, but he wasn't interested in talking about water quality tests or the latest government study on the bay's health. He wanted to tell the stories of people who lived near, worked on and loved the bay- the tugboat captains, backyard environmentalists and crabbers. The result - "Voices of the Chesapeake Bay" - is nearly 30 hours of interviews, portions of which have been aired on Buckley's "Sunday Brunch" show on WRNR-FM, and two CD compilations.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
ALL MARYLAND IS divided among three watersheds, though you might not know it given the attention to the Chesapeake Bay, whose drainage basin includes most of the state, and most of our environmental attention.A lesser-known one is the Gulf of Mexico, whose drainage extends to the westward-sloping sliver of Garrett County between Backbone Mountain and West Virginia.The gulf's problems may be greater than the Chesapeake's, with a "dead zone" of low-oxygen water that some years covers thousands of square miles.
BUSINESS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2003
In the early to mid-1990s, while studying landscape design at the University of Maryland, College Park and environmental sciences at what was then Salisbury State College, Jayson Meyers grew plants in ponds in his mother's back yard in Cub Hill. That led to a mail-order nursery business. Today, Meyers is president of Wayfarer Aquatic Nurseries Inc., a three-employee business in Perry Hall that provides wetland plant materials, dune and tidal area restoration, bio-engineering, pond management and consulting.
NEWS
By Matthew Kasper and Matthew Kasper,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 2004
With only seven days left until Christmas, 6-year-old Gabriel Webster still wasn't sure yesterday what presents he wants. But if you ask him about his favorite bird, it's a no-brainer - the penguin. "I like them because they waddle," Gabriel said, collecting sticks and trying to keep pace with the 11 other people looking for birds in the woods of the Otter Point Creek nature reserve. Gabriel, of Bel Air, was one of six children who participated yesterday morning in the "Bopping with the Birds" event at the Anita C. Leight Estuary Center, where they mimicked the movement of birds to music before going into the Harford County woods to try to spot them.
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