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NEWS
July 8, 1999
UNDERWATER grasses make up the forest of the Chesapeake Bay. They nurture and shelter the estuary's creatures, hiding vulnerable young fish and crabs and feeding the geese and ducks. They are a powerful indicator of the health of the Chesapeake.After years of slow progress in restoring these submerged plants, the latest survey shows a slight setback. That's understandable given the uncontrolled vagaries of nature, such as weather, that don't stay neatly on a trend line.The worst news from the annual submerged grasses survey is that losses are occurring in places most important to blue crabs, notably Tangier Sound, the major nursery of juvenile crabs.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
A Baltimore startup said Thursday that it received a $100,000 investment from the Maryland Technology Development Corp. An Estuary LLC, which builds web and mobile social platforms for "next generation" professional development, said the money will support its technology development efforts. TEDCO is a quasi-state agency that invests in Maryland startups. The eight-month-old An Estuary - started by educators - has a tech platform in beta testing for teachers. It's based at Baltimore's Emerging Technology Center @ Johns Hopkins Eastern, a business incubator.
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NEWS
September 23, 1995
THE DIVERSE plant and animal life and natural conditions of the Chesapeake Bay have repeatedly proven too complex for humans to directly manipulate. Nature frequently finds a way to frustrate well-intentioned cleanup plans and to teach us a new lesson in the dynamics of the bay.The latest example is in the report that levels of nitrogen and phosphorus, two key pollutants of the bay, have not declined over the past decade despite major efforts to curb their...
FEATURES
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
More than 70 percent of the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams are falling short of water quality goals, according to a report released Tuesday. The "Bay Barometer" report is issued annually by the Chesapeake Bay Program, the federal-state partnership that oversees restoration efforts for the bay. This year's report includes a new category that combines water quality readings such as dissolved oxygen and clarity. The bay and its tributaries are broken into 291 sections, of which only 29 percent had an adequate score.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1993
FORKED RIVER, N.J. -- Piece by piece, salt marsh by salt marsh, environmentalists and the federal government are pushing to preserve the last tracts of undeveloped shoreline along Barnegat Bay, the shallow 75-square-mile estuary that is one of the least heralded but most important coastal resources in the northeastern United States.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, aided by local and national conservation groups, has expanded its Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge northward along the New Jersey coast to acquire open marshland squeezed between condominiums and expensive waterfront homes that have spread along the bay over the last four decades.
NEWS
By Karen Rivers and Karen Rivers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 2003
Sixteen-year-old Justin Bender hopes to become an actor one day, or maybe a director, and also loves playing volleyball. But lately, his weekends have been spent trimming brush, laying mulch and lifting logs. Bender, of Aberdeen, is the driving force behind the building of a new trail at the Anita C. Leight Estuary Center, a nature preserve east of Edgewood. The teen is earning his Eagle Scout status by organizing a community project to build a quarter-mile path that will allow access to the center's new property.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | September 21, 2008
About a dozen children watched as a giant fishing net was pulled out of the Otter Point Creek and placed inside an ice chest. The bounty included a largemouth bass, which was tossed back into the water, and a blue crab, which the children gathered around to touch. The remaining fish were sorted and placed into ice chests partially filled with water. One by one, the children reached into the net, caught a slippery creature in their hands and held it up to be identified. "That's a straight bass, that's a bluegill and that's a pumpkin seed," rattled off Margaret McGinty, a Maryland Department of Natural Resources employee.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
Summer camp at a pristine estuarine research center in Abingdon is all about appreciating nature. The staff at the Anita C. Leight Estuary Center on Otter Point Creek teaches children to paddle a canoe, build a shelter and light a fire. Campers hike along the shore, chase a frog hopping through the marsh and identify an animal by its tracks. Or, maybe, if they are a tad too young for the more strenuous activities, they decorate picture frames with leaves and milkweed pods, capture small insects in a bug box and race mealworms on paper plates.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 2003
GROTON, Conn. -- Forty years ago in the summer of 1963, a writer for The New Yorker named Morton M. Hunt spent two weeks circumnavigating Long Island Sound in a little sailboat. When he sat down to write, he mourned. A way of life was disappearing. The old culture of the sound -- a still wild mix of scruffy boatyards, Gold Coast snobs and fishermen, all set against the vast mirror of nature -- would surely be homogenized and pushed to the brink, Hunt wrote in the magazine, by the pell-mell rush of suburbanization and the mass market.
NEWS
August 16, 1992
Beneath the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay lies an unseen jungle of grass. It nurtures the teeming vessel of aquatic life that sustains the Land of Pleasant Living for 14 million humans above ground. The underwater grass feeds and protects fish, mammals and birds; it cleans the estuary waters of sediment and pollutants.Both man and nature have destroyed much of this submerged vegetation over time, but the fecund beds have staged a remarkable comeback over the the past decade and the entire bay has benefited.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you!" Gov. Martin O'Malley, do you hear these words from the citizens of Maryland or are they just lyrics from a The Hollies 1974 hit song that many of us remember? Have you completely disregarded human life in your quest for higher office? These are my questions to you. After reading the investigation by The Sun's Timothy Wheeler ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rule," June 16), am I to believe that this is how our governor protects the citizens of Maryland?
NEWS
By Tom Horton | March 26, 2012
In the highest-tech hospital, one of the first things they still do is simply take your pulse. And if I could go back to when theChesapeake Bay'shealth was better and make changes to keep it that way, a lot of them would focus on simply taking the estuary's vital signs. Comprehensive, long-term and well-publicized monitoring of trends in water chemistry, aquatic life and land use throughout the watershed could have saved so much time and argument. It could have saved money by preventing the worst declines and by guiding restoration more efficiently.
NEWS
May 16, 2010
A turning point. A fresh start. A new hope. How often have Marylanders heard these words spoken about the future of the Chesapeake Bay over the last quarter-century or more? Usually they are articulated by politicians touting some new multi-state agreement or strategy that they insist will lead to a cleaner, healthier body of water. In recent days, these all-too-familiar promises have been heard again, this time on the strength of two seemingly linked events — a settlement of a lawsuit brought by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation against federal regulators for not sufficiently enforcing Clean Water Act standards and the release of the Obama administration's plan to revive the Chesapeake Bay by essentially doing what the environmentalists have long been seeking.
NEWS
September 13, 2009
More than a quarter-century ago, the governors of Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania, along with the administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, agreed to a partnership to restore the Chesapeake Bay. Since then, the federal role in that partnership has been helpful but all too limited, with states left to do much of the heavy regulatory lifting on their own. That looks to be changing, and none too soon, given the Chesapeake Bay's compromised...
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | June 21, 2009
If you're going to an outdoors function with a group of nature-type scientists, do not assume they have any influence over the conditions in the immediate area. That was a take-away message Thursday morning as about 100 members of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and 50 volunteers from Harford County and the Department of Natural Resources gathered for some do-gooding at the Anita C. Leight Estuary Center in Abingdon. Slabs of clouds the color of fireplace ashes had dumped buckets of rain in the pre-dawn hours.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | September 21, 2008
About a dozen children watched as a giant fishing net was pulled out of the Otter Point Creek and placed inside an ice chest. The bounty included a largemouth bass, which was tossed back into the water, and a blue crab, which the children gathered around to touch. The remaining fish were sorted and placed into ice chests partially filled with water. One by one, the children reached into the net, caught a slippery creature in their hands and held it up to be identified. "That's a straight bass, that's a bluegill and that's a pumpkin seed," rattled off Margaret McGinty, a Maryland Department of Natural Resources employee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
It's only a short drive from Baltimore, but when you pay a visit to the nearby banks of Otter Point Creek, the city's streets -- and maybe even civilization -- will feel as if they're miles away. Take to the fresh water in a canoe, and you'll be at one with the seemingly untouched area, where beaver, bald eagles, osprey and great blue herons live. "There's this really neat oasis within the developed world we live in," said Heather Helm, who manages Harford County's Leight Park, which surrounds and protects the waterway.
NEWS
By Edward Flattau | December 20, 2002
WASHINGTON - The National Park Service is considering including parts of the Chesapeake Bay watershed in the national park system, and that would be a very good idea. A sizable national park designation may well be the bay's best chance to survive as an ecologically viable estuary. Yet the NPS is quick to declare that it is not considering the addition of a large national park unit as part of its study to examine alternatives for expanding its jurisdiction. Undoubtedly, it seeks to reassure politically powerful developers and private property groups that an NPS land grab is not in the offing.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | April 15, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration wants to spend more than $56 billion to conserve farmland over the next decade, prompting an unprecedented push by Chesapeake Bay advocates to carve out a slice of the money for the imperiled estuary. Lawmakers and environmentalists say that negotiations on this year's wide-ranging farm bill - better known for the subsidies historically provided to corn and sugar growers, among others - offer the best chance yet to protect the threatened waterway from contaminants flushed in from fertilizer and manure.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2006
On Thursdays, Wendy Baker Davis secures her 16-foot sea kayak to her car. Next, she packs her personal flotation device, a water pump and a pair of water shoes. Then she sets out from her home in Lancaster, Pa., to meet up with 20 other kayaking enthusiasts at Jean Roberts Park in Havre de Grace. Davis' bunch, known as the Pirates of North, is a northern Maryland offshoot of the Chesapeake Paddlers Association, a volunteer nonprofit group based in Greenbelt. The weekly outings by the Pirates are one of several paddling ventures available in the county for beginning to experienced kayakers and canoers.
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