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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 30, 1999
U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski has pledged to aid three young Estonian immigrants after they helped federal authorities build a case against leaders of a Woodbine church who forced the Estonians to clean apartments and a bookstore.Mikulski said in a statement, "I will continue to work with the Immigration and Naturalization Service to encourage them to do everything in their power to bring about a fair solution."Three church organizers were sentenced to jail terms in U.S. District Court this week after pleading guilty to charges they conspired to commit visa and immigration fraud.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | May 21, 2007
MOSCOW -- More than a half-dozen types of cheese disappeared from behind deli counters. Small bottles of chili powder, garlic seasoning and lemon pepper - indeed, every spice with the blue Santa Maria label - vanished from supermarket shelves. Old Tallinn liqueur, a sweet staple in a punchy cocktail called the hammer and sickle, suddenly was harder to come by. The word had come down from on high: Estonian products are no longer welcome in Russia. The row over the removal of a Soviet-era war monument and the remains of soldiers from a central square in the Estonian capital first prompted a diplomatic war of words, even looting and civil unrest.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | May 21, 2007
MOSCOW -- More than a half-dozen types of cheese disappeared from behind deli counters. Small bottles of chili powder, garlic seasoning and lemon pepper - indeed, every spice with the blue Santa Maria label - vanished from supermarket shelves. Old Tallinn liqueur, a sweet staple in a punchy cocktail called the hammer and sickle, suddenly was harder to come by. The word had come down from on high: Estonian products are no longer welcome in Russia. The row over the removal of a Soviet-era war monument and the remains of soldiers from a central square in the Estonian capital first prompted a diplomatic war of words, even looting and civil unrest.
NEWS
May 18, 2007
Concert -- World Artists Experiences will present a concert by the Estonian contemporary folk group V?gilased (The Mighties) at 7 p.m. today at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St., Annapolis. Free. www.worldartists.org.
NEWS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,Contributing writer | April 5, 1992
"This does not look like a prison. This looks like a hotel."Suchwas the view of Urmas Polluaas (pronounced Poe-loo-us) as he toured the Harford County Detention Center last weekend.It was the Estonian's first experience seeing an American jail.Polluaas, 25, was joined on the tour by fellow Estonian Aivar Rozko(pronounced Roez-koe), 30. Both are in the United States studying the U.S. penal system.The two are physical education teachers at a technical school in Estonia, but are studying to be correctional officers.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1999
Facing bleak lives in a struggling nation, three teen-age girls wandered into an auditorium in Estonia and quickly found themselves enchanted by an American pastor who preached devotion, discipline and love.Soon, they joined her church and eventually followed her to Howard County, where they were promised intense Bible studies and religious training. Instead, the teen-agers say they became indentured servants, cleaning apartments and businesses, laboring for a woman who offered hope but delivered betrayal.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2002
Westminster elected officials put their stamp of approval on a sister-city relationship with the Estonian city of Paide last night by signing on to a plan that would promote cross-cultural exchanges between business representatives, arts groups, students and municipal employees. At last night's Common Council meeting, Westminster Mayor Kevin E. Dayhoff and Paide Mayor Tonis Koiv endorsed an agreement that outlines several swaps between the two cities. The plans include sending manufacturing and high-tech executives from Westminster to Paide to review investment opportunities, and exchanging municipal employees to generate ways to solve each city's problems.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1999
After months of laboring at menial jobs for the pastor of a Woodbine church, a young Estonian immigrant says she faces another injustice: a forced return to her country and a family that doesn't want her back."
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
Dmitry Rozuk has traveled all over Europe and through parts of the Middle East, but the Estonian teen-ager knew America only through movies and news reports. He dreamed of coming here but lacked the means - until his mother e-mailed a Westminster government official. That correspondence led an anonymous Carroll County benefactor to put up money for the trip, and Dmitry and his family spent last week seeing sights in Central Maryland and beyond. In Washington, they met their country's ambassador to the United States.
NEWS
May 18, 2007
Concert -- World Artists Experiences will present a concert by the Estonian contemporary folk group V?gilased (The Mighties) at 7 p.m. today at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St., Annapolis. Free. www.worldartists.org.
NEWS
By Jessie Parker and Jessie Parker,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2004
The newly elected mayor of Paide, Estonia, Westminster's sister-city, arrived in Carroll County last night for a week of diplomatic visits. Mayor Indrek Kivimae will tour Westminster recreational facilities and participate in Fourth of July events, but he is here primarily to attend a Maryland Municipal League workshop focusing on the success of the city-to-city partnership. Kivimae will join Thomas B. Beyard, Westminster's planning and public works director, on a panel discussing the value of sister cities.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
Dmitry Rozuk has traveled all over Europe and through parts of the Middle East, but the Estonian teen-ager knew America only through movies and news reports. He dreamed of coming here but lacked the means - until his mother e-mailed a Westminster government official. That correspondence led an anonymous Carroll County benefactor to put up money for the trip, and Dmitry and his family spent last week seeing sights in Central Maryland and beyond. In Washington, they met their country's ambassador to the United States.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2002
Westminster elected officials put their stamp of approval on a sister-city relationship with the Estonian city of Paide last night by signing on to a plan that would promote cross-cultural exchanges between business representatives, arts groups, students and municipal employees. At last night's Common Council meeting, Westminster Mayor Kevin E. Dayhoff and Paide Mayor Tonis Koiv endorsed an agreement that outlines several swaps between the two cities. The plans include sending manufacturing and high-tech executives from Westminster to Paide to review investment opportunities, and exchanging municipal employees to generate ways to solve each city's problems.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2002
A four-day visit by Westminster officials to Estonia last month has given the city its best bet to find a soul mate on the other side of the world: Paide, a sister municipality in a nation that has risen from the constraints of Soviet rule to become an emerging Baltic powerhouse. Westminster's mayor and Common Council received their first public debriefing of that trip last night from Thomas B. Beyard, the city's director of planning and public works, one of two city officials who made the trek.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2000
A sky tour of Baltimore turned into a day at the races for a group of Estonian officials, including the Baltic country's ambassador to the United States, after the helicopter they were riding in made a precautionary landing on the infield at Pimlico Race Course because of mechanical problems. The Maryland Army National Guard helicopter landed on the northern end of the infield at 1:45 p.m., about 20 minutes before post time for the afternoon's first race. None of the 10 Estonians or the three crew members were hurt, said Capt.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
Joyce E. Perdue seemed to be conducting a sermon in federal court last month, holding her hands outstretched toward spectators, crying and pleading for forgiveness.The emotional appeal didn't surprise those who know "Pastor Joyce." They said she often uses preaching -- its rhythms and tears -- to garner sympathy and capture attention.Since the inception of the Word of Faith World Outreach church in Columbia in the late 1970s, Perdue has been its dynamic pastor, leading her flock down a path that ended in a federal courtroom.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | October 19, 1994
While Maryland National Guard units have had high-profile assignments in the Persian Gulf war, Liberia, Bosnia, Haiti and Somalia, a small group of its members have been quietly -- almost secretly -- working to help rebuild the tiny Baltic nation of Estonia."
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2000
A sky tour of Baltimore turned into a day at the races for a group of Estonian officials, including the Baltic country's ambassador to the United States, after the helicopter they were riding in made a precautionary landing on the infield at Pimlico Race Course because of mechanical problems. The Maryland Army National Guard helicopter landed on the northern end of the infield at 1:45 p.m., about 20 minutes before post time for the afternoon's first race. None of the 10 Estonians or the three crew members were hurt, said Capt.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 30, 1999
U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski has pledged to aid three young Estonian immigrants after they helped federal authorities build a case against leaders of a Woodbine church who forced the Estonians to clean apartments and a bookstore.Mikulski said in a statement, "I will continue to work with the Immigration and Naturalization Service to encourage them to do everything in their power to bring about a fair solution."Three church organizers were sentenced to jail terms in U.S. District Court this week after pleading guilty to charges they conspired to commit visa and immigration fraud.
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