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February 22, 2013
Hong Kong residents experienced the effects of an earthquake nearby. Meanwhile, the Internet is coldly ignoring Baltimore's lack of an NBA team today, heartlessly blabbing on about the league's just-passed trade deadline. Welcome to your online trends report for Friday, Feb. 22. An earthquake in southern China created an unusual stir in Hong Kong, which usually does not noticeably feel the effect of such tremors. The 4.8-magnitude quake struck about 110 miles north of the city. Relatively nearby, India and Australia were battling out a cricket test, gaining substantial worldwide Twitter attention.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
As Russia's actions in Ukraine rattle its neighbors, the Maryland National Guard is affirming its decades-long partnership with Estonia. Maryland has helped to train Estonian troops since shortly after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Now it's preparing to send A-10 pilots and liaison officers to Saber Strike, an annual U.S.-led security exercise that focuses on Estonia and its Baltic neighbors Latvia and Lithuania. The commander of the Maryland Guard traveled to Estonia last week for meetings with Northern European defense ministers and U.S. military leaders.
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NEWS
By KATHY LALLY | June 27, 1993
Moscow. -- Just 52 years ago, Lennart Meri was a frightened 12-year-old boy deported with his family to Central Russia for the crime of being Estonian.Today, Mr. Meri is the eloquent and elegant president of an independent Estonia. He represents his country completely, having suffered as it did dispossession, humiliation and subjugation while never quite losing the deep (although hidden) desire for independence.Even today the same powerful forces are at work in Estonia, shaping the debate over who has the right to claim citizenship in a country that is striving to restore its past.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | April 8, 2014
Situated in the extreme northeastern corner of the small Baltic Sea nation of Estonia, on the western bank of a river that serves as an international border with Russia, the town of Narva is on its nation's Route 1, and it is relatively small. Bel Air, on U.S. Route 1 and a relatively small town, has little in common with Narva. Leaders of the two communities, however, signed a sister city agreement last week via an Internet video connection. As a practical matter, having a sister city is a largely meaningless gesture.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2004
When Westminster chose Paide as its sister city two years ago, there were probably not many residents who knew where it was or anything else about the small town in the Eastern European country of Estonia. But after several cross-cultural exchanges and business tours between the countries, residents from both municipalities are learning about each other. Since September 2002, Westminster has organized a series of international exchanges that includes children's choir concerts, visits by city officials and tours with local business owners.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 15, 1991
The United States has opened makeshift embassies in Tallinn, Estonia, and Vilnius, Lithuania, and is offering limited consular services for visiting Americans.In Estonia, Americans in need of emergency services can contact the U.S. Embassy, at the Hotel Palace, by calling 444-761. In Lithuania, Americans can reach the U.S. Embassy, at the Hotel Draugyste, by calling 662-711.Lithuanian visas are $25 and can be obtained before leaving the United States or at the border. Estonia, meanwhile, has begun requiring entry visas for U.S. citizens 18 and older.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | June 20, 1995
Joyce Perdue was 3 years old when she stood up before a missionary convention and told the world she would go anywhere for God.Forty-eight years later, she has kept her word. The former Hanover resident and her husband, Donald, sold everything they had three years ago and moved to Estonia, where they have started a Bible school, a business and an adoption service."We saw the hunger in the hearts of the people for the Bible," the Rev. Joyce Perdue, 51, said as she sat in her parents' home in Severn, back for a two-month visit.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 26, 1992
TALLINN, Estonia -- Five months after declaring independence, the people of this Baltic state are teetering on the brink of economic collapse and political crisis.Fuel oil has almost run out -- many homes have no hot water, and heat has been cut back to a cool 60 degrees Fahrenheit. City officials have begun drawing up plans to evacuate most of Tallinn to the countryside, where people can warm themselves with wood fires.The country has eaten its last crust of white bread, and black bread is rationed at two slices a day per person.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | October 10, 1990
The Rev. Joyce Perdue didn't know what to expect from her trip last month to the Soviet republic of Estonia.She knew glasnost had taken hold, but she didn't know how strongly. She was worried that her street-corner preaching would be given a cool reception and that authorities would put up obstacles blocking her message.But what she and her husband found was a land of contradictions. The food was, for the most part, poor and, in many cases, rotten. The water was undrinkable and living accommodations deplorable.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Sun Staff | March 5, 1991
The minister's stories sound like tales from the Cold War - church members pleading for Bibles and being forced to register to attend church, KGB agents at the door, abysmal poverty.The Rev. Joyce Perdue, 46, returned last month from her second trip to the Soviet republic of Estonia, and it wasn't paradise in any earthly sense.But throughout he travels, the Hanover minister found a spiritual vineyard ready to harvest."They clap as I preach; they don't want you to stop preaching," she says.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2013
Hong Kong residents experienced the effects of an earthquake nearby. Meanwhile, the Internet is coldly ignoring Baltimore's lack of an NBA team today, heartlessly blabbing on about the league's just-passed trade deadline. Welcome to your online trends report for Friday, Feb. 22. An earthquake in southern China created an unusual stir in Hong Kong, which usually does not noticeably feel the effect of such tremors. The 4.8-magnitude quake struck about 110 miles north of the city. Relatively nearby, India and Australia were battling out a cricket test, gaining substantial worldwide Twitter attention.
SPORTS
August 9, 2010
U.S. sprinter Justin Gatlin clocked 10.17 seconds Sunday in Tallinn, Estonia, to win his second consecutive 100-meter final since coming back from a four-year doping ban. Gatlin, the 2004 Olympic champion, was running at the Ergo World challenge meet as he works toward the 2012 London Olympics. Before Tuesday, when he also ran in Estonia, he had not raced competitively since June 2006 after being banned because of a positive test for testosterone. Gatlin, 28, regained his eligibility in July but was expected to have difficulty finding races because of a Euro Meetings recommendation not to invite athletes who bring disrepute to the sport.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | June 5, 2009
Defense attorney Warren Brown has some advice for the prosecutor who just saw the juiciest charges against Sheila Dixon thrown out of court: Don't sweat the big stuff. A week ago, Circuit Court Judge Dennis Sweeney tossed out charges alleging Dixon took lavish gifts and travel from a developer who got millions in tax breaks from the city. Dixon still stands accused of stealing about $3,500 in gift cards meant for the poor. But that's small potatoes when you consider the original indictment had developer Ron Lipscomb dropping nearly that much on a weekend with Dixon at New York's Trump International.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 11, 2008
I'd like to think it was the sangria talking. But the plain truth is, when Anna said she doesn't find this country to be especially free, it was Anna talking. Granted, her complaint is hardly new. People often grouse about the lack of freedom in the land of the free. But you see, Anna - a friend's fiancee - is from Estonia, a former republic of the old Soviet Union. As in the Evil Empire, world's leading exporter of communism. So when Anna says she feels less free in the United States, where she now lives, than in the once-totalitarian regime where she was born, well ... it gets your attention.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | May 12, 2007
NARVA, Estonia -- In this quiet Estonian city on a wide river separating the small Baltic nation from its mammoth Russian neighbor, the official state language, in practical terms, is also a foreign one. One hardly seems to need Estonian in Narva, where the majority of residents are ethnic Russians and where ordering a taxi, getting medicine at the pharmacy, even instruction in school, are done in Russian. The use of Estonian is so limited here that many have a similarly limited ability to speak it. That, the Estonian government says, is the problem.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | April 28, 2007
MOSCOW -- An Estonian monument depicting a Soviet soldier that for months has stoked tensions between Russia and its Baltic neighbor was dismantled early yesterday after violent protests in the Estonian capital, and Moscow threatened to sever diplomatic ties over what it called "blasphemy" and a "mockery of the dead." One person died in clashes in central Tallinn that included fires, looting, bottle-throwing and other vandalism. Media accounts quoted the Estonian government as saying that the victim, who was not identified, had been stabbed.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
TALLINN, Estonia -- Proud as can be, Estonians are savoring their new crisp money, their very own kroons in place of rubles -- but there sure aren't many of them.On the first day of summer, Estonia took the plunge and issued what is supposed to be real money, backed by real wealth -- the first of the former Soviet republics to do so.The only problem is, there isn't much real wealth here. Residents were allowed to exchange their rubles up to a limit of 150 kroons -- worth $12.50. That's how much most people had to live on until the next payday, in mid-July.
NEWS
By RUSSELL WARREN HOWE | September 8, 1991
Smugly self-satisfied over the explosion of formerly communist countries into their ethnic particles, the West seems to be ignoring the negative global impact of Soviet and Yugoslav micronationalism.There has been modest concern at the number of World Bank basket cases with names like Slovenia and Uzbekistan which may soon be competing for the dollars of a currently recessionary, industrial world. Mostly, however, the only real anxiety has been that the legendary Cossacks of Kazakstan would somehow procure from Moscow the telemetric encryption codes of nuclear missiles on its soil and discover the desire to celebrate independence by firing them over the North Pole at the United States -- a prospect described by Rand and Brookings analysts at a recent congressional hearing as "barely plausible."
TRAVEL
By BEVERLY BEYETTE and BEVERLY BEYETTE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
VILNIUS, LITHUANIA -- The turrets, the ancient city gates and the cobblestoned streets -- these are the fairy-tale images of Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania, known collectively as the Baltic States. Since gaining independence in 1991, these northeastern European neighbors, occupied by the Germans during World War II and later forcibly annexed to the Soviet Union, have been bidding to become big-time travel destinations. The capitals -- Tallinn (Estonia), Riga (Latvia) and Vilnius (Lithuania)
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