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NEWS
December 6, 1997
Officials of a New Jersey health care company said yesterday that state Sen Larry Young's consulting firm has been paid a total of $46,300 since September 1996, not the $84,000 estimate published by The Sun yesterday.Mafalda Arena, a spokeswoman for Merit Behavioral Care Corp, said yesterday that company records showed Young's firm, the LY Group, has been paid $26,300 during the current year at a monthly fee of $7,000. Last year, she said, records show he was paid $20,000 for four months work at the $5,000 per month rate.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A Middle River man who accused a Baltimore police officer of assault and battery will receive nearly $50,000 in a settlement approved Wednesday by the city's spending panel. Charles Faulkner accused Officer Daniel Hersl of battering his face with a police radio and his fists during an arrest Sept. 1, 2010, in the 1900 block of Wolfe St., according to court records and a settlement memo. The Board of Estimates approved the settlement without discussion, although City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young voted to reject the agreement.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Maryland's economy would take a $15 million hit each day of a federal government shut down -- and the state would lose $5 million a day in revenue -- according to a memo drafted by Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration. Because of the high concentration of federal workers in Maryland, state budget officials project a two-week furlough period would amount to $51 million in lost income and sales tax revenue. Those estimates generally assume federal workers would not be paid retroactively as they have been after past shutdowns.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Constellation will be moved from its location in Baltimore's Inner Harbor for four months this winter to undergo more than $2 million in repairs - including $750,000 to fix rotting in its hull. The city Board of Estimates, which oversees spending in Baltimore, voted to approve the $750,000 expenditure for the ship, which has been docked in the harbor for almost 60 years. Money for the repairs comes from general obligation bonds approved by city voters in 2012. The ship will be dry-docked at the U.S. Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay from Oct. 20 to Feb. 20 for the repairs, said Christopher Rowsom, director of Historic Ships in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2002
Convinced that an estimate of a continued sharp decline in Baltimore's population is off-base, city officials are planning a formal challenge to the U.S. Census Bureau figures released this week. Census officials - acknowledging "some degree of uncertainty" in the first post-census 2000 estimates for more than 3,000 jurisdictions nationwide - say they would welcome added data from the city and would issue a corrected estimate if the information warrants it. "To let that estimate go unchallenged does damage to the progress we've been making," Mayor Martin O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | January 31, 1991
The state AIDS Administration now estimates that between 16,000 to 30,000 Marylanders were infected with the AIDS-causing human immunodeficiency virus at the end of 1990.The new estimate is far lower than the previous one of 70,000.AIDS Administration officials agreed yesterday that the revised estimate represents a "significant decrease" in numbers, but urged the public not to be lulled into thinking the magnitude of the state's AIDS problem has diminished."No, we don't need to do less, we need to do more," said Dr. Kathleen F. Edwards, the AIDS Administration director.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | January 31, 1991
The state health department has dramatically reduced its estimate of how many Marylanders are infected with the AIDS virus -- suggesting that the true number is one-quarter to one-half previous estimates.Cautioning that the lower estimates should not lull people into complacency, top health officials said yesterday they believe that between 16,000 and 28,000 people across Maryland were infected at the close of 1990.That compares with a previous estimate of 60,000, a projection that officials said was based, in part, on an outmoded formula and the belief that infected individuals were transmitting the virus at an unrealistically fast rate.
NEWS
By Jia-Rui Chong and Thomas H. Maugh II and Jia-Rui Chong and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2007
The United Nations has radically lowered years of estimates of the number of people worldwide infected by the AIDS virus, revealing that the AIDS pandemic is waning for the first time since HIV was discovered 26 years ago. The revised figures yesterday, which were the result of more sophisticated sampling techniques, indicate that the number of new infections peaked in 1998 and that the number of deaths peaked in 2005. The new analysis shows that the total number of people living with HIV has been gradually increasing - but at a slower rate than in the past.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance and Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
Government analysts downgraded the annual death toll from obesity yesterday in a study that is certain to bewilder a public already obsessed with dieting and nutrition. In fact, they inexplicably found that people who weigh a few pounds more than the ideal are less likely to die than those who weigh a few pounds less. Taken together, the findings will undoubtedly leave scientists and consumers arguing over obesity's true role in mortality - though no one argues that being overweight is good for you. The latest report by scientists with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that obesity kills about 112,000 people a year, only a third of the number estimated just four months ago. But Dr. Kathleen Flegal, who led the study reported in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, said the lower death estimate should not make consumers complacent about their expanding waistlines.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1996
With all contracts awarded, South Shore Elementary School will cost nearly $6.2 million, some $465,000 over the estimate of $5.7 million.However, the school system will have to pay only the $5.7 million it originally budgeted for the project, said Rodell E. Phaire Sr., director of facilities planning and construction.The reason is a new system that used a construction management firm to develop the cost estimate. Baltimore-based Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. guaranteed it would bring the project in on time and at the estimate it developed.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
The days surrounding the Fourth of July holiday are perennially among the busiest of the summer when it comes to travel on Maryland roadways and across its skies - and this year will be no exception. About 858,400 Marylanders are expected to travel between Wednesday and Sunday next week, a 1.6 percent increase over last year and more than any other Independence Day travel period in the past five years, according to estimates to be released today by driver advocacy group AAA Mid-Atlantic.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
City officials agreed Wednesday to pay $50,000 to the family of a City College student whose teacher struck her in the face with a chair, breaking the girl's nose. The payment settles a $150,000 suit filed by a Baltimore man named Harry Singleton in 2013 on behalf of his daughter, who was a ninth-grader at the school in April of 2010 when she suffered the injury. The teacher was struggling the get the class' attention as he was returning report cards, city officials said. He began to bang a chair on the floor to get the class to pay attention, but it rebounded and struck a female student in the nose, the city said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
City officials promised to cover the financial costs to the Charles Village residents displaced by the collapse of East 26th Street, and that tab now sits just shy of $100,000, city officials said Thursday. It will continue to grow, as well, even though the residents are back in their homes. The costs — mostly for hotel rooms for the residents of the 19 homes that were evacuated — are in addition to the city's $18.5 million estimate for the street's reconstruction, said Caron Brace, a spokeswoman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, whose office released the figures.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 29, 2014
The fish kill affecting Baltimore Harbor and the Patapsco River appears to be over, according to a spokesman for the Maryland Department of the Environment . But state biologists are still unclear why an estimated 7,000 fish turned belly up so early in the year. Biologists went back out on Tuesday to check from the mouth of the river up to Fells Point and Fort McHenry, said Jay Apperson, MDE's deputy communications director.  While biologists revised upwards their original estimate that maybe 1,000 fish had died Monday, they did not see any newly dead or dying fish, he said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Maryland will receive federal disaster funding to help pay for snow-clearing efforts from a February storm that left a foot and a half of accumulation across parts of the region in a single day, the Federal Emergency Management Agency announced Thursday. No cost estimate from the storm has been released by the state, so it isn't clear how much funding Maryland could get. The funding, distributed through the state, will assist eligible local governments and nonprofits "on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work in Baltimore, Carroll and Howard counties," according to FEMA.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
A federal appeals court has upheld a ruling that Baltimore County discriminated against older employees when it required them to contribute more to their pensions than younger employees. Since 2007, the county has battled a lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of two retired corrections officers who said the pension system violated the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act. Monday's ruling by the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals affirms a 2012 lower-court decision and could result in millions of dollars in damages.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 2, 2007
WASHINGTON -- More people in the United States are infected each year with the AIDS virus than previously thought, according to federal health officials, in a finding that could roil the debate over how much money should be spent on prevention efforts. While the new numbers are sobering, no one is yet sure whether more people have actually been infected in recent years or the figures are simply a better estimate than the old ones. Two more years of data are needed to answer that question.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and Bill Atkinson and June Arney and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
Acknowledging that its method of calculating the economic impact of the Baltimore Convention Center overstated that impact, the state has adjusted its formula to provide a range of estimates. Now, instead of offering a single estimate, the Maryland Department of Budget and Management is reporting that the convention center's economic impact was between $227 million and $565 million in the 2002 fiscal year. For years, the state has boasted of huge economic benefits generated by the convention center.
NEWS
March 8, 2014
A house fire in Carroll County on Friday resulted in an estimated $225,000 in damage and displaced the homeowner, according to the Maryland State Fire Marshal's Office. The fire occurred was reported at about 4:45 p.m. Friday in the 3500 block of East Lawndale Road in the Reisterstown area. It took about 45 minutes to control the blaze, the fire marshal's office said. The preliminary cause was listed as accidental; combustible items near a heating source. The owner was displaced and was being assisted by relatives, fire officials said.
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