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BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | January 30, 1992
Real estate industry leaders say President Bush's proposal to give first-time homebuyers a $5,000 tax credit could have a powerful effect on the economy by accelerating home sales and providing work for thousands of unemployed people seeking jobs in home construction and related fields."
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BUSINESS
By By Jamie Smith Hopkins | The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2010
The real estate industry is up in arms about an Anne Arundel County decision to collect taxes on certain types of home sales based not on what the buyers paid, but on what the sellers owed on their mortgages as the deal was struck. What's at issue are short sales, which are homes that change hands for less - sometimes far less - than the balance due on the loans. The county policy may be unique in the country, according to the American Land Title Association, which represents companies involved with home sale settlements.
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BUSINESS
By James M. Woodard and James M. Woodard,Copley News Service uvB | October 27, 1991
The Sunday open house may be coming to the Soviet Union.Forty-four Soviet real estate managers recently visited the United States for a three-week study of real estate theory and practice. The tour was part of a broader educational program aimed at developing a Soviet real estate industry."Russia is beginning to take its first steps toward market-driven real estate development," said John M. Stone, president of the Commercial Investment Real Estate Institute, the host for the study group.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | July 3, 2009
Daniel M. Cunningham, a real estate salesman who formerly worked in the fashion industry, died of cancer June 25 at the Veterans Administration Hospice Center at Loch Raven. The Homeland resident was 65. Mr. Cunningham was born in Baltimore and raised in Guilford. He was a 1961 Loyola High School graduate who studied at Loyola College and the University of Baltimore. He worked at the old Eutaw Savings Bank until he joined Stewart's department store as a men's and women's apparel buyer in 1968.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1995
Technological advances are shrinking the demand for commercial real estate, a trend that will alter city skylines, darken offices and forever change the landscape of the $3.3 trillion industry.Before long, a growing number of industry analysts and academics predict, the technological revolution will affect every sector of the real estate industry, from downtown skyscrapers to distribution centers to manufacturing plants and strip shopping centers.The trend will profoundly change the way future properties are developed, designed, leased, financed and analyzed for investment, the experts believe.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2001
Baltimore County Circuit Court Clerk Suzanne K. Mensh agreed yesterday to extend the hours at the county land records office after cutbacks last month sparked an outcry from real estate abstractors and lawyers. The abstractors, who research property deeds, joined others in the real estate industry in complaining that the hours had been reduced during one of their busiest times. Interest rates near record lows have spurred property sales and mortgage refinancings. Mensh reduced the hours of the land records office after employees in her office reported that personal items had been stolen and computers tampered with after they left for the day. The clerk's office, which handles civil and criminal records, and marriage licenses, is on the second floor of the circuit courthouse, along with land records.
BUSINESS
By Scott Waldman and Scott Waldman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2005
Maryland's real estate industry continued to get more competitive as the number of people holding real estate licenses grew 14 percent in the past fiscal year, according to the Maryland Real Estate Commission. A total of 44,418 people held active licenses in the fiscal year that ended June 30, up from 38,857 a year earlier. "It's one of the largest industries in the state," said Steven VanGrack, commission chairman. At the current rate, he said, the number could hit 50,000 in the next year or two. Nationwide, the number of real estate agents has grown to more than a million, a 10 percent increase from last year, said Walter Molony, a spokesman for the National Association of Realtors.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2000
Catherine Dorsey of Baltimore has been named regional vice president of the National Association of Real Estate Brokers Inc., the oldest minority trade association in America. Dorsey was nominated at this year's annual convention in Las Vegas. She will oversee the NAREB activities of the Maryland, Virginia and Washington chapters, which have a combined membership of about 350. Members of NAREB are referred to as "Realtists." NAREB, founded in 1947, advocates fairness in housing and is active in civic and legislative affairs.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | May 26, 1993
Surfside Sally's site gets a quieter tenantFells Point, hang on: There's a new tenant for the space vacated by Surfside Sally's, the Brown's Wharf bar whose customers were considered rowdy and crazed even by Fells Point standards. And the landlord, Constellation Real Estate Inc., said this time will be different.Lista's Restaurant will open in June, serving New Mexican food out of a 14,500-square-foot space on the waterfront, Constellation spokesman Larry Lichtenauer said. The entertainment, far from the late-night dancing of Surfside Sally's, will include roaming guitar players and art exhibits keyed to Mexican holidays.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | March 14, 2009
Real estate agent Vito Simone resigned yesterday as president of the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors to focus on resolving a personal bankruptcy case in which he and his wife list $3.9 million in debt. "There have been many circumstances in these economic times of great uncertainty that have affected so many in profound ways, including me and my family," Simone said in his resignation letter. "Recent events require me to step aside and focus on the needs of my family." David McIlvaine Sr., a broker with Keller Williams Select Realty in Ellicott City and president-elect of the Realtors board, automatically becomes president, said Joseph T. "Jody" Landers III, GBBR executive vice president.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | March 14, 2009
Real estate agent Vito Simone resigned yesterday as president of the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors to focus on resolving a personal bankruptcy case in which he and his wife list $3.9 million in debt. "There have been many circumstances in these economic times of great uncertainty that have affected so many in profound ways, including me and my family," Simone said in his resignation letter. "Recent events require me to step aside and focus on the needs of my family." David McIlvaine Sr., a broker with Keller Williams Select Realty in Ellicott City and president-elect of the Realtors board, automatically becomes president, said Joseph T. "Jody" Landers III, GBBR executive vice president.
BUSINESS
By JUNE ARNEY and JUNE ARNEY,SUN REPORTER | April 11, 2006
Home sales in the Baltimore region dipped in March, the sixth straight month of decline over the previous year, and the buildup of inventory escalated as the market headed into the crucial spring selling season. Pricing, however, remained strong, posting double-digit gains over a year earlier. The 3,170 homes sold in Baltimore and five surrounding counties was a 13 percent decline from March 2005, according to figures released by Metropolitan Regional Information Systems Inc., a Rockville company that tracks homes sold through the multiple-listing service, reported yesterday.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 29, 2006
There were literally hundreds of facts tossed about, but perhaps the most essential was emblazoned on a campaign-sized blue-and-white badge pinned to Oliver Henderson's lapel: "I'm a Realtor and I Vote." While Henderson says, "I think that elected officials recognize that real estate is important," the general election is eight months away and growth is certain to be a central issue, so his badge and statistics were unsubtle reminders to candidates not to make his industry their whipping boy. Henderson, president-elect of the Howard County Association of Realtors, released a report Monday whose primary purposes were to examine market conditions this year and to document the economic importance of the industry.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 2005
There are no cows more sacred in the tax code than the deductions for mortgage interest and property taxes. Together, they add up to at least a $75 billion annual subsidy for housing and homeowners. President Bush, in establishing his advisory panel on tax reform, specifically asked the group to preserve support for homeownership. So it was quite a shock that the panel, in its final report, concluded that it had no choice but to significantly trim the home mortgage deduction and eliminate state and local tax deductions if it wanted to find a way to simplify the income tax. By combining that move with a variety of other measures, the panel was also able to bury the alternative minimum tax, a complex tax originally intended to prevent the wealthy from escaping taxes that is now starting to hit millions of otherwise ordinary upper-middle-class families who have a typical range of itemized deductions and personal exemptions.
BUSINESS
By MARY UMBERGER and MARY UMBERGER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 6, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO -- America's historic real estate boom is cresting, and the rate at which home prices appreciate should begin to slow significantly next year, according to the chief economic forecaster for the National Association of Realtors. It was the closest statement yet to an admission by the real estate industry that the bull market for housing may have run its course. "It's the peak of the boom," David Lereah said at the Chicago-based trade group's annual meeting here, which concluded last week.
NEWS
July 6, 2005
BANKING & FINANCE The Columbia Bank appointed Heather M. Schimkaitis as assistant controller and Sean P. Heffernan as vice president, commercial banking for the Howard County financial institution. Schimkaitis will assist in corporate finance, accounting and Securities and Exchange Commission report functions. Heffernan will develop and maintain relationships with small andmidsize companies in the Baltimore-Washington corridor. HEALTH CARE Greater Baltimore Medical Center named Mary Whittaker director of quality assurance and performance improvement for the Towson medical facility.
NEWS
September 17, 1990
William H. Masson Inc., America's oldest customs house, recently promoted Glen Burnie resident Joan Brown to the position of traffic manager for the firm.Brown, whose two daughters live in Glen Burnie with their families, has been associated with Masson for 14 years, during which time she utilized her skills to ensure the smooth and expedient movement of clients' cargo through the Port of Baltimore.Her new responsibilities will include the total management of Masson's department, and increased roles in sales and revenue areas.
BUSINESS
By James Gallo | March 21, 2004
A proposal to make the Maryland Real Estate Commission self-sufficient by increasing licensing fees is not likely to be approved by the General Assembly this year, members of the commission said last week. The nine-member panel had pushed legislation to create a fund to set fees for the state's 40,000 real estate agents and brokers. The commission, now funded through the state's general fund, has become overwhelmed with more people entering the real estate industry, officials said. Steven VanGrack, chairman of the commission, said agents and brokers are willing to pay more for their two-year licenses if the funds are directed toward regulating the real estate industry.
BUSINESS
By Scott Waldman and Scott Waldman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2005
Maryland's real estate industry continued to get more competitive as the number of people holding real estate licenses grew 14 percent in the past fiscal year, according to the Maryland Real Estate Commission. A total of 44,418 people held active licenses in the fiscal year that ended June 30, up from 38,857 a year earlier. "It's one of the largest industries in the state," said Steven VanGrack, commission chairman. At the current rate, he said, the number could hit 50,000 in the next year or two. Nationwide, the number of real estate agents has grown to more than a million, a 10 percent increase from last year, said Walter Molony, a spokesman for the National Association of Realtors.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2004
Coldwell Banker names Taylor vice president Brigit Taylor has been named vice president of administration and real estate support services for the Mid-Atlantic region of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. Taylor's responsibilities include developing programs for company administrative operations and overseeing community outreach programs. A former professional international skier, Taylor is a 10-year veteran of the real estate industry. She recently moved back to Baltimore from Vail Valley, Colo.
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