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By Los Angeles Daily News | January 6, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- As profits from commissions continue to decline, a wave of small- to medium-sized real estate firms are opting to merge or sell out.The consolidation was expected by experts, who say the boom years in 1987 and 1988 caused many companies to over-expand in order to compete. When the market began retrenching, some of those firms did not have enough capital to last out a slow market."It is really the professionalizing of an industry that had it too easy for too long," said Sanford Goodkin, executive director of the KPMG Peat Marwick/ Goodkin Real Estate Consulting Group.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Is Ocean City the most dangerous place to live in Maryland? Even more dangerous than Baltimore? The surprising answer is yes, at least according to analysis by Movoto , a California-based real estate brokerage firm known for its data-based research of various trends and market conditions across the nation. The company this week released its list of the safest places to live in Maryland. Movoto said its report looked at places with populations of at least 5,000 and then ranked them based on FBI crime statistics in 2012.
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BUSINESS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | March 21, 1993
In the past 15 years, John and Marylou Bintz have packed up their belongings and relocated eight times."We've never stayed anywhere long enough to plant roots," Mrs. Bintz said. The family's latest move was from Connecticut to Carroll County, where they bought a home in September with the help of Jim and Joan Brown, husband-and-wife Realtors for Grempler Realty."They were extremely helpful," Mrs. Bintz said. "They gave us a detailed tour of the area and showed us where everything was. It was like having someone in your family meet you when you got here.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
A Howard County couple is suing one of the largest residential real estate brokerages in the state and a Columbia title company for more than $11 million, alleging that the firms had financial ties that violated federal law. The case is a proposed class action that could involve thousands of plaintiffs, all home buyers who bought a home with the Creig Northrop Team of Long & Foster Real Estate since 2000 and used a settlement firm called Lakeview Title...
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1998
Stick around for three-quarters of a century and you're bound to make a few friends along the way. At 75, Colliers Pinkard has compiled a sizable and impressive list.The Baltimore commercial real estate firm's clients and cronies -- a list that includes BT Alex. Brown Inc., IBM Corp. and Rite Aid Corp. -- also have brought success, and have helped catapult Pinkard to its position as the city's top real estate services firm.But it's more than friendships that keeps Pinkard's star rising, company officials contend.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
Carrolltown Center's bricks and mortar may be located in Eldersburg, but its marketing effort now spans cyberspace.Thanks to a new Internet World Wide Web site, Black Rock Associates Inc. is providing leasing and tenant information electronically to prospective customers and others about Carrolltown, a mall that the Sparks real estate firm bought for $10 million in January 1993."
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
For the first time since Walter D. Pinkard Jr. took over the family real estate firm in 1982, he is officially sharing top management duties. Pinkard chose David M. Gillece, an executive vice president, to be president of Collier Pinkard effective today. Pinkard, 52, will remain chief executive officer and chairman and will continue to give direction to the firm, which has had a hand in many of the region's largest and most prestigious companies' moves. He will take on Gillece as a partner in running the 250-person firm, which operates three local offices and two in North Carolina.
BUSINESS
By James M. Woodard and James M. Woodard,Copley News Service | May 19, 1991
Large real estate brokerage firms are growing larger. And many smaller firms are phasing out.The trend is sparked by the increasing importance of computers in today's real estate operations. An effective computer system is expensive, and it's drawing a line in the operational sand for brokers.The trend was revealed in a recent survey conducted by the National Association of Realtors. Information was collected and analyzed from 1,800 firms nationwide.While only 3 percent of all real estate firms had a sales force of more than 50 agents, those giant firms account for more than half (53 percent)
NEWS
December 13, 1990
Joseph P. Daiger Jr., 66, a real estate broker and semiretired partner in a real estate firm, died Tuesday after a heart attack while driving his car at Dulaney Valley Road and Jarrettsville Pike.A mass of Christian burial is to be offered at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Immaculate Conception Roman Catholic Church in Towson.Mr. Daiger, who lived on Dulaney Valley Court in Towson, had been semiretired for about a year from the firm of Daiger and Lynch, with which he was associated for about 15 years.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kerch and Steve Kerch,Chicago Tribune | December 9, 1990
CHICAGO -- The real estate company of the future is not going to be operated like an open cockpit biplane where seat-of-the-pants aerial ability will enable the pilot to fly high.Instead, real estate firms in 2000 are going to be run a lot more like a computerized jumbo jet where only sophisticated coordination will ensure proper takeoff.The outline of the 21st century real estate company has been emerging in the last few years as companies scramble to compete in an era of lower demand for office space and a tightening supply of development capital.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
The New York real estate firm that purchased Harborplace in November paid close to $100 million for the iconic Inner Harbor shopping center, according to Baltimore land records. Ashkenazy Acquisition Corp., through an affiliate company called AAC HP Realty LLC, spent $98.5 million to buy the two shopping pavilions from General Growth Properties, records show. AAC borrowed $76 million from UBS Real Estate Securities Inc. to finance the transaction, records show. Although news of the sale of Harborplace did not become public until last fall, Ashkenazy and General Growth, according to land records, entered into a sale agreement in March.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
The Baltimore waterfront's iconic Harborplace is being sold to a New York real estate investment firm that has a reputation for purchasing distinctive retail centers, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Tuesday. Ashkenazy Acquisition Corp., which is collecting unique commercial landmarks like Faneuil Hall Marketplace in Boston, Union Station in Washington and Rivercenter in San Antonio, purchased the Inner Harbor mall from General Growth Properties, Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Corporate Office Properties Trust, a real estate investment and development firm based in Columbia, is offering 7.5 million new common stock shares for $24.75 apiece, the company announced Thursday. An additional 1.1 million shares have been offered to the underwriters, who must exercise their purchase option within 30 days, COPT said in a statement. The firm expects to raise at least $178.2 million on the stock sale, the statement said. If the underwriters purchase all of the shares available to them, the earnings could go as high as $204.9 million, COPT said.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
Baltimore-based Yerman Witman Gaines & Conklin Realty said Friday that it has been acquired by a Pennsylvania residential real estate company for an undisclosed amount. The merger brings together Prudential Homesale Services Group's 950 real estate agents in 21 Pennsylvania locations with YWGC's 190 agents in five offices. The new company will be called Prudential Homesale YWGC Realty and will have dual headquarters in Lancaster and Baltimore. Prudential Homesale saw the acquisition as a way to break into the Maryland market, while YWGC expects "significantly more exposure" for its listings, company officials said in statements.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 11, 2011
Mary Suzanne Beck Keech, a corporate managing director of Studley Inc., a Washington commercial real estate firm, who was also an active alumna of Garrison Forest School, died of cancer Monday at Georgetown University Hospital. The former Catonsville resident had celebrated her 46th birthday last month. The daughter of Rea Keech, a former Buick automobile dealer, and Mary Keech, a Talbots Cross Keys sales associate, Mary Suzanne Beck Keech was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Ethel S. Braun, president of the Baltimore real estate brokerage E.G. Rock Inc. for 55 years, died Jan. 6 of heart failure at her Glen Arm home. She was 98. Ethel Segerman was born in Baltimore and raised on Mount Royal Terrace. After graduating from the old Mount St. Agnes High School in 1930, she moved to California, where she lived for two years in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara. She returned in 1932 to Baltimore, and six years later married Wilson J.C. Braun Sr., who worked for the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River.
BUSINESS
By J. Linn Allen and J. Linn Allen,Chicago Tribune | February 18, 1992
CHICAGO -- Coldwell Banker, one of the nation's three largest residential real estate firms, took a major step yesterday toward forcing home sellers to disclose defects that could affect the value of their property.The company became the first major nationwide firm to require sellers to fill out a written disclosure form for all listings obtained by its company-owned offices across the country. Disclosure forms will also be required for homes purchased by buyers working through those Coldwell Banker offices.
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