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BUSINESS
By TRIF ALATZAS | April 20, 2003
A recent study by the Maryland Real Estate Commission shows the agency's Web site is the most popular among those posted by the state's 23 licensing units. Commission staff members said the site receives about 7,500 hits monthly. Real estate professionals use it to learn about new laws affecting the industry as well as required fees and licensing requirements. Real estate agents and brokers also can apply and renew their licenses at the site - a record 88 percent of them are renewing their licenses via the Internet.
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BUSINESS
By JUNE ARNEY and JUNE ARNEY,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
The Maryland Real Estate Commission sees light at the end of the tunnel. It just needs to make it to July. That's when the regulatory agency expects an infusion of funding that will allow it to add what it considers sufficient staff - a luxury it hasn't had as the real estate market fueled record home sales and added thousands of agents and brokers to the industry it regulates Even as the real estate market boomed, budget cuts left the commission with...
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BUSINESS
By Trif Alatzas | May 25, 2003
Michael A. Cassell is set to become the chairman of the Maryland Real Estate Commission next month. He was elected unanimously by board members at their meeting last week. Cassell, a real estate broker and appraiser, has been in the industry for 31 years. He owns Creative Real Estate Services and Express Appraisal Services in Baltimore, and had been vice chairman of the commission. Cassell will fill the post held for the past two years by Rockville lawyer Steven VanGrack, who was elected vice chairman of the board last week.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - While President Bush touted his policies to the nation's Realtors this month, his administration was pressuring the industry over the fees home sellers pay brokers in a red-hot housing market. With the median price of a single-family American home now $188,800, a change of a single percentage point in the fee that a seller pays a broker can shift thousands of dollars from one to the other. Discount real estate brokers have sprung up, many of them on the Internet, offering to represent sellers for less than the fee of 5 percent or more that traditional brokers usually charge.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2000
Charles G. Chambers, former executive director of the Maryland Real Estate Commission, died Friday of cancer at Manor Care Hospice in York, Pa. He was 82. The former Campus Hills resident had lived in Stewartstown, Pa., since 1980. He was executive director of the state commission that oversees the licensing of real estate brokers and salesmen in Maryland from 1972 until his retirement in 1989. He was responsible for the day-to-day operations of the commission, which enforces the principles of realty law and the ethics code governing the Maryland real estate industry.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | August 26, 2001
Steven Van Grack seems to have a knack for getting people to see his point of view. In a meeting last year with the secretary of the state's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, Van Grack argued that it was ridiculous for commissioners of the Maryland Real Estate Commission - who are unpaid volunteers - to have to fight for downtown parking spaces when they convene their monthy meeting. He made his point. Problem solved. Tomorrow, Van Grack, who became chairman of the commission in July, has a return meeting where he wants to convince the secretary that the commission's budget should be increased to reflect in some part the amount of home sales in Maryland, about $12.5 billion last year, according to commission figures.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. appointed three new members to the Maryland Real Estate Commission this month in a move that replaced the panel's chairman and put the governor's stamp on a board that regulates almost 40,000 brokers and agents. The revamped commission will continue to focus on making the board self-sufficient during a time of record growth in home sales, the new chairman of the nine-member panel said Thursday. "The special funding [to make the board self-sufficient] is the most important issue the commission has addressed," said Steven VanGrack, the chairman.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2004
Vote delay sought for proposal on on real estate ads Maryland's Joint Committee on Administrative, Executive and Legislative Review has asked the state Real Estate Commission to delay voting on a proposed regulation that would clarify an existing law on real estate advertising. The proposal would require the name of a realty brokerage to be the same size as the name of the associate broker or salesperson in an advertisement. It would also set size requirements for the use of team or group names.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2003
A reader wants to know what disciplinary actions salespeople in a subdivision under construction can face if they offer misleading information to customers. Dear reader: Licensed real estate salespeople must adhere to the statutes and regulations governing their professional conduct. A licensed real estate salesperson may be subject to disciplinary action by the Real Estate Commission for making false or misleading statements, particularly if they deliberately mislead you, rather than by making a good-faith error.
BUSINESS
By Trif Alatzas | October 19, 2003
The Maryland Real Estate Commission has formed a committee to study whether salespeople for new homebuilders should be licensed by the state. The move sparked criticism from the homebuilding industry, which said builders are regulated by the attorney general's consumer protection division. The Real Estate Commission voted last week to investigate the issue, saying it has received complaints from consumers about their protections when buying a new home. New homebuilders are regulated by the state, but the people who sell the homes do not have to be licensed real estate agents.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | April 24, 2005
THE JUSTICE Department has two blunt warnings for the American home real estate establishment: Do not block efforts to save consumers money through rebates of real estate commissions. Do not stand in the way of discount "fee-for-service" firms that will list sellers' properties for a fixed-dollar amount, but not perform all the traditional brokerage services such as holding open houses or advising on buyers' offers. Ignore that advice, according to department, and you will find yourself in big trouble.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | April 17, 2005
The General Assembly session, which ended last week, created a special fund to cover the costs of the state's Real Estate Commission and help handle the growing numbers of real estate licenses and consumer complaints. Fees collected from real estate brokers and agents - ranging from $45 to $95 every two years - will go into the newly created fund, rather than the state general fund, and help the commission in investigating a growing backlog of cases. From 2001 to 2005, real estate licenses rose 63 percent and consumer complaints increased by 50 percent.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2004
Vote delay sought for proposal on on real estate ads Maryland's Joint Committee on Administrative, Executive and Legislative Review has asked the state Real Estate Commission to delay voting on a proposed regulation that would clarify an existing law on real estate advertising. The proposal would require the name of a realty brokerage to be the same size as the name of the associate broker or salesperson in an advertisement. It would also set size requirements for the use of team or group names.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth Harney | July 25, 2004
WHAT DO American home sellers and buyers really pay to real estate agents in commissions? Although every market and region in the country has its typically quoted set of norms - often 6 percent to 7 percent - most consumers never learn what commission rates get paid in their areas. Commission rates are the most sensitive subject in the real estate industry. Brokers or agents from competing firms can be charged with antitrust law violations for even whispering about rate structures among themselves.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. appointed three new members to the Maryland Real Estate Commission this month in a move that replaced the panel's chairman and put the governor's stamp on a board that regulates almost 40,000 brokers and agents. The revamped commission will continue to focus on making the board self-sufficient during a time of record growth in home sales, the new chairman of the nine-member panel said Thursday. "The special funding [to make the board self-sufficient] is the most important issue the commission has addressed," said Steven VanGrack, the chairman.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
Licensing fees for the state's nearly 40,000 real estate agents and brokers likely would increase for the first time in more than a decade under a House bill designed to let the Maryland Real Estate Commission become self-sufficient during a time of rapid growth in the home-selling business. The bill would allow the commission to set fees based on the costs of existing and expanded services. Currently, new and renewal license fees, in effect since 1989, are $95 for a real estate broker, $65 for an associate real estate broker and $45 for a real estate salesperson.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | January 22, 1993
Repeated fax transmissions by an Ellicott City real estate broker have cost him a $2,000 fine and a suspended real estate license under the state's 1989 "junk fax" law.The case against Donald W. Scott, of the Summa Agency in the 4000 block of Chatham Road, came after the Maryland Real Estate Commission received 12 complaints about his practices."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 12, 2000
U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson set a May 15 trial date yesterday for Del. Tony E. Fulton, a West Baltimore Democrat, and Annapolis lobbyist Gerard E. Evans on charges of defrauding clients of Evans' paint and asbestos company. The federal mail and wire fraud charges stem from an alleged scheme in which Fulton talked about proposing legislation that could have cost Evans' clients millions of dollars. By threatening to introduce the bills, Fulton helped Evans drive up his lobbying fees, prosecutors charge.
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