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NEWS
January 19, 2005
Francis G. Bartlett Jr., 79, real estate Francis Gilpin Bartlett Jr., who owned an Easton real estate business, died of a stroke Jan. 12 at his home there. He was 79. Born in Baltimore and raised in Easton, he was the grandson of the Rt. Rev. John Gardner Murray, Episcopal bishop of Maryland from 1903 to 1929. Mr. Bartlett was a 1943 graduate of St. Paul's School and served in the Army's medical corps in the latter part of World War II. He then joined his father's Bartlett Realty Co. in Easton and later owned it until retiring in 2000.
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EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
Karen Coffey, an award winning real estate business coach and top producing agent, was recently named CEO of Keller Williams American Premier Realty. In 2011, Coffey was recognized as the number one team leader/CEO in the Greater Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware region of Keller Williams Realty. She is also a certified 6-Figure Business Coach and Real Estate Teams systems trainer, teaching agents how to create and maintain effective teams. She started a real estate team and sold $6 million of real estate in her first six months.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
William H. C. Wilson, founder and former president and owner of the venerable Roland Park real estate business W. H. C. Wilson & Co., which for generations has sold homes in Baltimore's more affluent neighborhoods, died Monday of kidney failure at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 78 and lived in Roland Park. Mr. Wilson, a quiet and modest man who favored conservative suits, sport coats and bow ties, was a highly regarded member of the Baltimore real estate community for more than four decades.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2012
Mary Bell Grempler, a colorful real estate saleswoman whose pioneering firm grew to become the No. 1 independently owned real estate business in the state, died Monday of emphysema at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Stevenson resident was 81. "Mary Bell was very independent and highly spirited. She was a true character among women and men and quite a lady," said Helen Delich Bentley, former congresswoman and federal maritime commissioner. "She was a person who never hesitated to let you know exactly what she thought," said Mrs. Bentley, a longtime friend.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
Robert Franklin Miller, a con artist who has posed as a chiropractor, a lawyer and a world karate champion, was convicted this week in connection with another fraudulent scheme. He pleaded guilty Tuesday in Baltimore County Circuit Court to four counts of felony theft -- charges that stem from a phony real estate business he operated from the summer of 2001 through the spring of 2002. Miller is scheduled to be sentenced March 16 and under terms of the plea agreement could receive up to 12 years in prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 18, 1996
"Glengarry Glen Ross" sounds like lyric poetry, but in David Mamet's play of that name, it refers to a questionable parcel of land being sold by an even more questionable parcel of real estate swindlers.Under Suzanne Pratt's direction, Theatre Hopkins will produce this 1983 play about the underbelly of the real estate business for five weekends beginning tomorrow.Theatre Hopkins performs in the Merrick Barn on the Homewood campus of Johns Hopkins University. Show times are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2: 15 p.m. Sundays, with one Sunday evening performance at 7: 30 p.m. on May 12, the final night of the run. Tickets are $10 and $12. Call (410)
NEWS
January 15, 2006
Roadside signs serve a purpose Much has been written and said about signs (including my signs). Throughout Anne Arundel County, there are numerous roadside signs indicating open houses, school events, yard sales, community activities, sales by owners, builders' activities, rentals, new homes, food or fund drives, directional purposes, garage sales, business activities, bake sales, sports events, political campaigns, arts and crafts events, church events,...
EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
Karen Coffey, an award winning real estate business coach and top producing agent, was recently named CEO of Keller Williams American Premier Realty. In 2011, Coffey was recognized as the number one team leader/CEO in the Greater Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware region of Keller Williams Realty. She is also a certified 6-Figure Business Coach and Real Estate Teams systems trainer, teaching agents how to create and maintain effective teams. She started a real estate team and sold $6 million of real estate in her first six months.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2000
Theodore Egorin was once a successful Baltimore delicatessen owner and real estate broker. But lately he appeared less able to cope with the idleness and health problems that had come with old age. "He was 81 and had more energy than me," said his 53-year-old son, Sammy Egorin. "He had nothing to do. He would go to the country club and play bridge all day." When Egorin last talked to his father and mother, Naomi, on Wednesday afternoon, everything seemed normal. The next day, he called to offer to shovel snow from their Pikesville townhouse.
BUSINESS
By James M. Woodard and James M. Woodard,Copley News Service | March 1, 1992
Josie Ralstin has been a real estate saleswoman since 1979. (( She is now a member of her brokerage firm's Multi-Million Dollar Club and has been netting annual sales commissions from $75,000 to $100,000 for several years.Ms. Ralstin is one of an increasing number of women who are becoming leaders in real estate sales. And they are rising in the ranks of high officeholders in major real estate organizations."I really love the real estate business," she said. "It brings you into a working relationship with all kinds of people."
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
Selling a ski resort near Deep Creek Lake is one of several options that its owners are considering to resolve financial difficulties related to another business. Karen Myers, one of the three partners of Wisp Resort in Garrett County, said in a brief interview Thursday that the partners were having trouble negotiating the repayment of a $28.5 million loan with BB&T Corp. The loan was tied to the construction of an 18-hole golf course and a community near Deep Creek Lake, which is experiencing lackluster sales of home sites, Myers said.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
The money-losing operations of the Maryland Jockey Club significantly contributed to corporate owner MI Developments' $47.3 million fourth-quarter net loss from its overall racing business. Part of that loss is $23.7 million from the company's equity investments, which is primarily the operations of Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course , the company announced late Thursday. The Ontario-based MI Developments owns 51 percent of the two tracks, while Pennsylvania casino operator Penn National Gaming owns the remaining equity.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
Joseph M. Bolewicki Jr., an appliance dealer who was recalled as the "last of the old-school Highlandtown retail giants," died July 21 of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 84 and lived in Northeast Baltimore. "He ran a great neighborhood business," said Patrick Michael McCusker, owner of Nacho Mama's restaurant in Canton. "His store brought me back in time. When you bought an appliance from him, you also bought a piece of his character. " Born in Baltimore, he grew up in Canton and attended St. Brigid's Parochial School and was a 1944 Loyola High School graduate.
BUSINESS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | March 16, 2008
With home prices sliding, interest rates falling and worried sellers looking to deal, this may be a good time to become a homeowner. But is it a good time to become a real estate agent? During the boom, young people -- and those looking for a midlife career change -- were drawn to real estate. Money magazine listed "real estate agent" among the Top 20 jobs for the "young and restless." As the market slows and competition increases, young agents are feeling the pinch, perhaps more than others.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | November 1, 2007
Sinclair Broadcast Group, unable to expand its roster of television stations, disclosed yesterday that it has spent $35.1 million to acquire and invest in commercial real estate in Maryland and elsewhere. David D. Smith, chief executive of the Hunt Valley broadcaster, told analysts yesterday that the real estate deals fit the company's strategy of finding high-return opportunities outside television. The company has seen returns as high as 20 percent on some of its ventures, he said. But the move puzzled some analysts, who questioned whether shareholders of a broadcasting company want their management investing in real estate.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
Cephas Richardson wanted to refinance a house along Lorraine Avenue in Charles Village. But instead of calling a bank, he called a number he saw on one of the "We Buy Houses" signs in the neighborhood. Richardson was told he could get a $100,000 refinance. All he had to do was show up at a building on Mulberry Street with $5,000 in cash. "I never went," said the vice bishop of Greater Jerusalem Church in Waverly. Richardson eventually got a $65,000 loan from a reputable lender and didn't let his house slip through his fingers.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 2005
NEW YORK - Some people in the real estate business never know, when they get up in the morning, whether the uncontrollable urge to buy an apartment will strike during the course of the workday. "Sometimes when I walk into a place for business, the hair on the back of my neck stands up," said Diane M. Ramirez, the president of Halstead Property. "I can see the finished product, the pearl, and I feel the creative juice of knowing what it could be if I just got my hands on it." Dolly Lenz, a broker who is executive vice president and managing director of Prudential Douglas Elliman Real Estate, often has the same reaction to properties she is scouting.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
The money-losing operations of the Maryland Jockey Club significantly contributed to corporate owner MI Developments' $47.3 million fourth-quarter net loss from its overall racing business. Part of that loss is $23.7 million from the company's equity investments, which is primarily the operations of Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course , the company announced late Thursday. The Ontario-based MI Developments owns 51 percent of the two tracks, while Pennsylvania casino operator Penn National Gaming owns the remaining equity.
NEWS
January 15, 2006
Will of the majority is disregarded In response to Larry Helminiak's letter in The Sun for Carroll County on Jan 8, I have a few comments. No matter how much he and the handful of other Option 1 supporters try to spin it, Option 2 was the popular choice. He mentions that only 50 people showed up at one or more of the public meetings. Another report I read earlier stated that about 70 people repeatedly attended the meetings, and were the same "activists" (i.e., Option 2 supporters) that one might expect would show up. What I haven't heard about is the groundswell of support for Option 1 at the meetings.
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