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BUSINESS
By James M. Woodard and James M. Woodard,Copley News Service | October 14, 1990
There is a new high-tech glint in the eye of your friendly neighborhood real estate broker, as he focuses on expanded services and revenues.Using the latest computer-generated capabilities, many brokers can now not only find a home for a prospective buyer, they can also line up the best possible financing package.Using a computerized loan-origination system, a broker can quickly compare the interest rates and other terms from a number of lenders. From this up-to-the-minute information, the loan that is most favorable to the homebuyer (borrower)
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Daniel W. Hubers, a retired real estate broker who was also a competitive sailor, died Saturday at Franklin Square Medical Center of heart failure. The lifelong Middle River resident was 96. The son of Anton Hubers, an optometrist, and Anna Hubers, a homemaker, Daniel Weber Hubers was born and raised on Weber Avenue in Essex. He was a 1936 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and attended what is now Loyola University Maryland, where he was a pre-med student. Mr. Hubers graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law but never took the Maryland bar examination.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | June 14, 1991
After two years of declining real estate sales, Ocean City appears to be poised to ride a comeback wave that could make 1991 a refreshing respite from dry seasons past.That was one of the conclusions of a recent report by the real estate consulting firm of Lippman Frizzel & Mitchell. The firm, which has offices in Baltimore and Silver Spring, has been tracking the Ocean City housing market for nearly 20 years. The report characterizes 1990 as the second consecutive year of declining sales, but predicts 1991 may reverse the trend.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Garnette Lynch Brant, a retired real estate saleswoman who also had a Waverly consignment shop, died of congestive heart failure Nov. 19 at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 93 and lived in Lutherville. Born Mary Garnette Lynch in Yadkin County, N.C., she was raised in Winston-Salem. She was the daughter of Sallie Wishon Ledbetter, an R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. employee, and Luther Lynch, a carpenter. She graduated from Bowman Gray High School in 1937 and became a bookkeeper. In 1940, she left Winston-Salem and moved to Washington, D.C., to work in Army intelligence.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Walter F. Roche Jr. and David Nitkin and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2001
A majority of Baltimore County Council members would open the process for choosing real estate brokers following a report of no-bid deals involving an agent with ties to the county executive's special assistant. The county should advertise for brokers when it looks for office space, several council members said, rather than rely on an unpublicized, no-bid list that contains the names of the few agents who knew to call and get on it. "Maybe a change would be to put notification in the paper," said Councilman John A. Olszewski Sr., a Dundalk Democrat.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1996
Carroll County wooed commercial real estate brokers from the Baltimore area yesterday with a train ride, 18 holes of golf at a swank new country club and a surprise kicker: "free land."Stunning vistas of rolling hills, babbling streams and lush cornfields were enhanced by a cloudless sky as 10 sales representatives and county officials traveled by train from River Downs, an exclusive golf course development near Finksburg, to Union Bridge, home of Maryland Midland Railway.The pastoral landscape was a mere distraction.
BUSINESS
By Audrey Haar and Audrey Haar,Staff Writer | April 12, 1992
Each spring, "For Sale" signs pop up alongside the daffodils and tulips. This year, the spring selling season is even more important, because the industry has been in a long slump. This story, the first of three parts, looks at real estate brokers. In the next two Sundays, we'll look at people who are selling and buying homes.The era of the Sunday real estate agent is gone. A barrage of government regulations, combined with the demands of homebuyers, is making it tougher for real estate agents and builders without business savvy and legal skills to stay in the business.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | November 10, 1994
The Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors yesterday denied charges of racial discrimination and antitrust law violations leveled by a group of black real estate brokers and agents.Responding to a lawsuit filed Friday, board President David W. Baird countered that the trade association offers membership to all licensed real estate brokers and agents in the state and actively encourages minorities to join.In a suit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Real Estate Brokers of Baltimore Inc. accused the board of monopolizing real estate sales and discriminating against black real estate brokers, agents and sellers by limiting access to electronic home-sales listings.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2005
The Real Estate Brokers of Baltimore Inc., a minority trade association of real estate professionals, will present student scholarships and awards for community service, business achievement and promoting democracy in housing at its annual awards and scholarship banquet April 8. The trade group, which represents predominantly minority real estate agents and brokers who call themselves Realtists, is a chapter of the National Association of Real Estate Brokers,...
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2003
Area real estate brokers will begin marketing city-owned residential properties for a fee under an agreement approved by the city Board of Estimates yesterday. Mayor Martin O'Malley praised the agreement with the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors as a better way to sell vacant city homes than relying on the slow-moving city bureaucracy. "We need to get more of these properties back on the tax roll," O'Malley said of the thousands of vacant houses owned by the city. "We're bad landlords, and we're bad real estate brokers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Richard E. Hook III, a retired sales executive and real estate broker, died Sunday of heart failure at his summer residence in Sherwood Forest. He was 95. Richard Edwin Hook III was born in Baltimore and raised on North Calvert Street. He was a 1936 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in 1940 from the Johns Hopkins University. He enlisted in the Army in 1941 and later went to officer candidate school, where he was commissioned a second lieutenant in 1943. Mr. Hook, who rose to captain, commanded a company of the 447th Battalion in New York and later in Seattle.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Herbert A. Davis, a Baltimore real estate broker and decorated World War II veteran, died Monday of progressive supranuclear palsy at Keswick Multi-Care Center. He was 87. "Herb was always very enthusiastic and just a great guy," said Dorothy F. "Patsy" Ross, who works in real estate sales for Chase Fitzgerald & Co. "He was enthusiastic, positive and was always thinking on the bright side, and he really knew the business," said Mrs. Ross. "He was a great salesman. " Judy L. Bushong, a real estate agent, worked with Mr. Davis for 28 years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Adam D. Cockey Jr., a leader in the Baltimore-area real estate industry who had headed a Roland Park brokerage, died Oct. 30 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson of complications from a fall he suffered last month while on vacation in Phoenix, Ariz. He was 71 and had homes in Cockeysviile and St. Michaels. Born in Timonium, he was a member of the family that lent its name to Cockeysville. He attended Lutherville Elementary School. He was a 1959 graduate of Towson High School, where he was class president.
NEWS
December 23, 2011
The lawsuit brought by several Baltimore are homeowners against the largest residential real estate team in the state is the direct result of the Maryland Real Estate Commission ignoring the rules governing brokers and the required course work needed to become a broker ("Lawsuit alleges fraud in real estate deals," Dec. 20). Recently, the commission allowed sales people, like Creig Northrop, to form teams without having the required training a broker must have. There is a reason brokers must have training, prior to managing salespeople.
BUSINESS
By James M. Woodard and James M. Woodard,Copley News Service | January 24, 1993
Mortgage lenders and brokers now face a new set of disclosure regulations designed to protect borrowers, but some industry leaders say it will have a boomerang, negative effect.The new regulations require mortgage brokers and lenders to issue a "good-faith estimate" of all costs in a proposed loan within three working days of receiving an application. The disclosure information includes all fees paid to mortgage brokers."It's another layer of paperwork that does not benefit borrowers, and costs mortgage brokers and lenders additional time and money," said Jim Thompson, president of a regional chapter of the National Association of Mortgage Brokers.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2002
NRT, Long & Foster among largest U.S. real estate brokers Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage's parent company NRT Inc., and Long & Foster Real Estate Inc. are among the country's largest real estate brokers, according to the 2002 Real Trends 500 report. NRT, based in Parsippany, N.J., ranked first, with 397,049 transaction sides and 759 offices nationally. Long & Foster, based in Fairfax, Va., was No. 4 with 83,747 sides and 165 offices. A company gets one transaction side for being the listing or selling broker.
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