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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 29, 1999
HAVANA -- On the field and in the stands, Americans and Cubans came together yesterday, interrupting 40 years of official enmity for one brief and shining moment of the game they both love, baseball.A stadium full of Cuban fans warmly welcomed the Baltimore Orioles, the first U.S. professional team to compete here since shortly after Fidel Castro took power in 1959 and diplomatic relations with Havana disintegrated.Clad in his familiar olive drab military garb, Castro himself marched stiffly across the field before the game to greet the Orioles in their dugout.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. -- When the Orioles made the unprecedented move to play the Cuban national team in Havana on March 28, 1999, the stated purpose was to improve relations between the countries through a sporting exhibition. There was no way of knowing that 14 years later a young Cuban fan in the stands that afternoon would be wearing an Orioles uniform and preparing to play at their spring training complex. Wednesday, 26-year-old outfielder and Cuban defector Henry Urrutia made his first public statements about receiving his work visa - after spending a total of 18 months in the Dominican Republic and Haiti - and finally joining the organization that gave him a $778,500 signing bonus last July.
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MOBILE
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 1999
HAVANA -- Today, one of the longest waits in a country of waiting finally ends -- American professional baseball returns in the form of the Baltimore Orioles. "It will be the best play of baseball in 40 years. It is something that we have dreamed of for 40 years," said Michel Enriques, 20, a college student and, like many here, a soul-deep fan of the sport that both unites and separates his country and the one 90 miles to the north. "To get a good seat, I will be there at 8 a.m. " At noon today at Estadio Latinoamericano, the Orioles will play a Cuban team in the first such matchup since before 1959, when Fidel Castro swept into power and the two countries' relationship quickly deteriorated into a stubborn cold war marked by invasion, nuclear threat and trade embargoes.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 29, 1999
HAVANA -- On the field and in the stands, Americans and Cubans came together yesterday, interrupting 40 years of official enmity for one brief and shining moment of the game they both love, baseball.A stadium full of Cuban fans warmly welcomed the Baltimore Orioles, the first U.S. professional team to compete here since shortly after Fidel Castro took power in 1959 and diplomatic relations with Havana disintegrated.Clad in his familiar olive drab military garb, Castro himself marched stiffly across the field before the game to greet the Orioles in their dugout.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1999
HAVANA -- Orioles owner Peter Angelos still appears confident that his team will take part in a humanitarian home-and-home exhibition series with a team of Cuban All-Stars this spring. But the baseball delegation that visited Havana over the long holiday weekend likely will return home today without a final agreement to stage the potentially historic sports exchange."We've been very pleased with the reception we've received here and we intend to make every effort to resolve the questions that remain in order to bring our mission to a successful result," Angelos said last night.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Joe Strauss and Peter Schmuck and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1999
HAVANA -- Everything appears to be in place for the Orioles' historic visit to Cuba. Major League Baseball officials arrived on Thursday. Orioles owner Peter Angelos and his entourage flew in yesterday afternoon.The only thing missing is the team, which is scheduled to arrive on a charter flight tonight after facing the New York Mets in an exhibition game at Port St. Lucie.The Orioles will be greeted by Cuban officials at Jose Marti International Airport and attend an official function later in the evening.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. -- When the Orioles made the unprecedented move to play the Cuban national team in Havana on March 28, 1999, the stated purpose was to improve relations between the countries through a sporting exhibition. There was no way of knowing that 14 years later a young Cuban fan in the stands that afternoon would be wearing an Orioles uniform and preparing to play at their spring training complex. Wednesday, 26-year-old outfielder and Cuban defector Henry Urrutia made his first public statements about receiving his work visa - after spending a total of 18 months in the Dominican Republic and Haiti - and finally joining the organization that gave him a $778,500 signing bonus last July.
NEWS
March 30, 1999
CONSIDERING it didn't look like it was going to happen as recently a month ago, the game between the Baltimore Orioles and Cuban All-Stars was everything Orioles' principal owner Peter Angelos could have imagined.Both teams and their fans -- watching at Estadio Latinoamericano or on television -- came away from an intensely competitive game with a lot of mutual respect. The Orioles grabbed an early lead, were stymied by Cuban pitching and eventually clawed out an extra-inning 3-2 win.The United States has long embraced baseball as quintessentially "American."
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 28, 1999
HAVANA -- Today, one of the longest waits in a country of waiting finally ends -- American professional baseball returns in the form of the Baltimore Orioles."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Joe Strauss and Peter Schmuck and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1999
HAVANA -- It may have looked like the Orioles' goodwill trip to Cuba went off without a hitch, but the game still was under a cloud of uncertainty as late as Saturday afternoon.Orioles consultant Scott Armstrong said yesterday that a dispute over the tickets allotted to the club for distribution to Cuban youth baseball players prompted a veiled threat that the Orioles would refuse to board the charter flight for Havana.The Orioles originally tried to negotiate an allotment of 5,000 tickets for distribution to the club's entourage and to youth groups in Cuba, but had reduced that demand to 500. The Cuban sports authorities eventually settled on 270 tickets, enough for all of the players who had taken part in the youth baseball exchange with underprivileged children from the Baltimore/Washington area.
MOBILE
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 1999
HAVANA -- Today, one of the longest waits in a country of waiting finally ends -- American professional baseball returns in the form of the Baltimore Orioles. "It will be the best play of baseball in 40 years. It is something that we have dreamed of for 40 years," said Michel Enriques, 20, a college student and, like many here, a soul-deep fan of the sport that both unites and separates his country and the one 90 miles to the north. "To get a good seat, I will be there at 8 a.m. " At noon today at Estadio Latinoamericano, the Orioles will play a Cuban team in the first such matchup since before 1959, when Fidel Castro swept into power and the two countries' relationship quickly deteriorated into a stubborn cold war marked by invasion, nuclear threat and trade embargoes.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Joe Strauss and Peter Schmuck and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1999
HAVANA -- Everything appears to be in place for the Orioles' historic visit to Cuba. Major League Baseball officials arrived on Thursday. Orioles owner Peter Angelos and his entourage flew in yesterday afternoon.The only thing missing is the team, which is scheduled to arrive on a charter flight tonight after facing the New York Mets in an exhibition game at Port St. Lucie.The Orioles will be greeted by Cuban officials at Jose Marti International Airport and attend an official function later in the evening.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1999
HAVANA -- Orioles owner Peter Angelos still appears confident that his team will take part in a humanitarian home-and-home exhibition series with a team of Cuban All-Stars this spring. But the baseball delegation that visited Havana over the long holiday weekend likely will return home today without a final agreement to stage the potentially historic sports exchange."We've been very pleased with the reception we've received here and we intend to make every effort to resolve the questions that remain in order to bring our mission to a successful result," Angelos said last night.
NEWS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1999
MIAMI -- Sometimes, Vivian Ruiz closes her eyes and suddenly is transported back to her childhood. She sees the streets where she grew up in Cuba, her old school, her friends. The images are so clear, as if days have passed instead of years."I remember everything," she said yesterday, pushing aside her plate while sitting at a corner table at Sergio's restaurant in Miami.Ruiz glanced across the room toward a television screen and was reminded again why she left.The Orioles' exhibition game against a Cuban all-star team wasn't drawing much interest from the sparse lunchtime crowd, but Ruiz's emotions were stirred as Fidel Castro was shown in the stands at Havana's Estadio Latinoamericano.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | April 7, 2005
THE NEW brickwork at Camden Yards looks terrific. The waist-high walls erected in front of the outfield box seats last month add a little more class to one of the most beautiful ballparks in America and leave you to wonder just who is responsible for this aesthetic triumph. When we find out, somebody ought to tie him up in the batting cage and let the corner infielders and outfielders hit fungoes at him. Apparently, no one consulted the baseball operations department to find out if it really was such a good idea to put up a brick wall where Melvin Mora or Larry Bigbie might have to crash the fence to make a big out. "I think we might have to put some padding on that," said Bigbie.
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