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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Wrapping it up in a single sentence, Alexander McCall Smith writes in The Right Attitude to Rain , his third novel about journal editor and philosopher Isabel Dalhousie: "What had been dull and unintelligible had now become dull and intelligible, which was little achievement, but enough for the day. "
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
When she returns to Baltimore, Zoey Washington walks the streets with relative anonymity. She'll pop into local boutiques unnoticed. This isn't the reception you would expect for a woman who founded a nationally recognized styling collective, LittleBird, focused on the teen and tween demographic, and who has held editing positions with some of the world's best-known glossies. Washington, a 31-year-old graduate of Garrison Forest School and Columbia University, prefers it that way. But Washington's resume reads like a who's who of fashion elite: She's held positions at Marie Claire, Vogue and Essence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
Midweek Madness says "Happy Thanksgiving, pilgrims. " (That's '50s/'60s actress Barbara Nichols, in case you were wondering.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
With more than 20 years of experience, R&B singer Joe has had a front-row seat to watch the genre evolve.  And in 2014, the 41-year-old singer born Joseph Thomas believes R&B needs to remember romance - and being in love with more than only yourself - still matters. To him, the influence of rap's street bravado has chilled a genre that has long identified with warmth. “I just want it to be a little bit more about love and more about respect, and to talk about things that's going on right now, as opposed to bigging yourself up and making yourself look real smooth and fly,” Joe said on the phone earlier this week from New Jersey.
NEWS
By H. B. Johnson Jr | December 5, 1994
CONGRATULATIONS are certainly in order for Essence magazine. Its December cover story, normally devoted to such earth-shaking subjects as "10 hot holiday looks," deals with a deadly serious subject: AIDS.At first glance, it's hard to juxta pose the picture with the words. For the woman on the cover, with the cafe au lait skin wrapped in a hot little red evening dress, appears to be your standard cover girl. But the words tell you that she's "young, educated, drug-free, and dying of AIDS." Wisely, there are no other words; anything else would have distracted from the seriousness of the subject.
NEWS
By Sandy Coleman and Sandy Coleman,BOSTON GLOBE | November 3, 1996
It has been a long time since I've picked up a magazine and hated to put it down. But November's Essence is just that good. It's the 15th annual men's edition. Once each year, the women's magazine turns over its pages to honor and hear from African-American men.This year, the mix of male voices features a diverse group of young and old contributors. Blues singer B. B. King offers an excerpt from his new autobiography. Other writers include the late James Baldwin, self-taught clothing designer Karl Kani, and Cheo Hodari Coker, a Los Angeles Times reporter who writes with humor about his conflict over being a skinny man in a world where buff seems better.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
The novel "Crime and Punishment" is a gripping, modern psychodrama, a masterpiece of tension and suspense. A police detective seeks to solve a brutal double homicide without a shred of evidence — and sets himself the task of touching the conscience and saving the soul of the tormented young killer. It's a riveting story that probes the nature of good and evil and the sometimes blurry distinctions between enemies and allies. Why, then, in the stage adaptation currently running at Center Stage , does there seem to be so little at stake?
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 22, 1997
WHEN DID ''cool'' come to mean ''fitting in''?Christmas being one of the holiest days on the Christian calendar, my youngest boys plan to rise early that morning, steal downstairs in the coolness of pre-dawn, kneel reverently before the tree and pray that when they open their eyes, they'll see Old Navy shirts and Air Jordan athletic shoes. These are priority items on their annual gimme lists.I used to think it was just all-American greed. Actually, I still do. But I've also come to realize that what motivates my boys is more complicated than avarice.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2005
City Council President Sheila Dixon is one tough woman, whether working out at the gym or playing hardball politics at City Hall. So, uh, Madam President Tough-As-Nails, what's the deal then with the honey-brown highlights, the sexy camisoles and the ... (gasp!) false eyelashes?! The truth is, folks, Dixon's steely, "don't-mess-with-me, don't-mess-with Baltimore" exterior belies a softer, feminine side not often seen at council hearings or Board of Estimates meetings. You might not have picked up on it, but the trained eyes at Essence magazine did, and - with the help of a makeup artist, a hairstylist and a fashion expert - gave Dixon a makeover.
NEWS
By Jonathon Fuqua | September 30, 2001
WHEN THE twin towers fell and a cloud of dust rose in mournful tatters over the streets and buildings of lower Manhattan, we found it nearly unfathomable that, right before our eyes, so many had died. It was a heart-wrenching moment that was further amplified by new and unfamiliar fears. We wondered what was next. What public building in which American city would burn? What community would get sucked of life? How many of our people would die? And we continue to wonder these things. For the first time in many of our lives, the future is murky.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
Midweek Madness says "Happy Thanksgiving, pilgrims. " (That's '50s/'60s actress Barbara Nichols, in case you were wondering.)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
I suspect puckish intent in the incomparable Kory Stamper's post at harm-less drudg-ery  on the prescriptivist-descriptivist divide. Though I have commended "A Compromise: How To Be A Reasonable Prescriptivist" to you previously, I would like to admire a couple of the finer points.  Though the overall intent and tone are as irenic as anyone could wish, I noticed a few sly touches guaranteed to rattle the peeververein. A terminal preposition was the least. There was also a "the hoi polloi.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Wrapping it up in a single sentence, Alexander McCall Smith writes in The Right Attitude to Rain , his third novel about journal editor and philosopher Isabel Dalhousie: "What had been dull and unintelligible had now become dull and intelligible, which was little achievement, but enough for the day. "
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | January 20, 2013
The episode starts with a visit from Native American Ken Hotate, which sets up some great jokes about the Pawnee relationship with the local tribe, which Leslie describes as "murder-y. " Hotate is fun, poking the white people's political correctness and urge not to offend. In advance of their impending nuptials, Ben and Leslie are having their bachelor and bachelorette parties on the same night. Ann is planning Leslie's party with dancing, karaoke, booze, and "anything that can be penis-shaped, will be penis-shaped.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
What's the best way to fill an open space with smiles for a summer night? Fit in a big, bright movie screen, and hundreds are sure to follow. Every summer, in every corner of Baltimore, the light of the silvery moon turns outdoor silver screens into magnets for fun-seekers. Even a movie presentation expert as exacting as restoration whiz Robert A. Harris ("Lawrence of Arabia") has taken a turn at open-air presentation. "We did it with 'Napoleon.' We sat 5,000 people outside the Colosseum.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
The exploration and discovery of new and exotic sensory realms inspires chef John Shields' zest for cooking. The owner of Gertrude's Restaurant at the Baltimore Museum of Art uses travel to foreign shores to nourish that quest. Often called "The Culinary Ambassador of the Chesapeake Bay," Shields hosts the PBS television series "Coastal Cooking With John Shields" and has written three popular cookbooks on bay cuisine. To say Shields is busy is an understatement, so when he has time to get away, simplicity is key. He finds that and more, in his ancestral home of Ireland.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune zHC ALB | December 26, 1991
Earlier this fall, we wrote about a new catalog targeted at African-American women that will debut early in 1993; to be called "E Style," the catalog venture is being developed by Ebony magazine and Spiegel Inc.We've since learned that a catalog with the same target audience already exists. Essence By Mail catalog was launched seven years ago by Essence Communications, Inc., publisher of Essence magazine, and Hanover Direct, Inc., a mail-order retailer.Essence Catalog Director Michele Mullings, says, "We feature African-American women who model garments with the black figure (fit)
FEATURES
By Kim Traverso | October 4, 1991
When Harriette Cole attended Western High, she knew what she wanted to do -- be a writer or involved in fashion. She managed to do both.Twelve years later, the former model and now fashion editor of Essence was back at her alma mater last Friday sharing her life and experiences with the students.She found the experience humbling and gratifying. "It was nice to be appreciated and have a place to share my successes," says Ms. Cole, 30.She told the all-girl student body about growing up in Forest Park, where her parents still live, and her high-profile job at the leading lifestyle magazine for black women.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
The novel "Crime and Punishment" is a gripping, modern psychodrama, a masterpiece of tension and suspense. A police detective seeks to solve a brutal double homicide without a shred of evidence — and sets himself the task of touching the conscience and saving the soul of the tormented young killer. It's a riveting story that probes the nature of good and evil and the sometimes blurry distinctions between enemies and allies. Why, then, in the stage adaptation currently running at Center Stage , does there seem to be so little at stake?
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
It almost seems as if Jeff Holland can stand in the gallery of his museum for hours, just gazing at the pictures on its rugged walls. It isn't that he has nothing better to do. As executive director of the Annapolis Maritime Museum in Eastport, he's responsible for finding funds, planning events, installing materials and in general keeping the museum about life in and around the Chesapeake moving "full steam ahead," as he puts it in the museum's latest...
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