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Espionage

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NEWS
August 31, 2004
THE DENIALS are loud and resounding. The American Israel Public Affairs Committee called allegations that the American Jewish lobby received secret information about U.S. policy on Iran from a Pentagon analyst, and passed it onto Israel, "baseless and false." The government of Israel was just as emphatic about the charge: "false and outrageous." The reported FBI investigation touched a nerve. It raised the specter of divided loyalties, Israel spying on its chief ally and benefactor, mudslinging at a pro-Israel president on the eve of his renomination.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Spies, sex, drugs and a beaming Ronald Reagan. Those are the elements for one of the most arresting scenes you'll see this year on television. It will air Wednesday night on "The Americans," one of the most talked-about series this spring on cable TV. The scene features a female Russian spy on a mission, a male congressional aide on cocaine, and Elizabeth Jennings (Keri Russell), the Soviet sleeper agent at the center of the FX series, breaking into a congressman's office safe late at night while the other two go at it under a portrait of the Great Communicator.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane | August 27, 1995
"The French Secret Services: A History of French Intelligence from the Dreyfus Affair to the Gulf War," by Douglas Porch. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 623 pages. $32.50 Imagine rival American intelligence services headed up by Oliver North, Gordon Liddy and Sylvester Stallone and a culture of political scheming in which the drolleries of the Iran-Contra affair or Nixon's Plumbers would have been nothing special. Add a legacy of torture, assassination and massive domestic surveillance, take away congressional oversight, and you have an idea of espionage French-style.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
A military judge ruled Tuesday that Army Pfc. Bradley E. Manning violated the Espionage Act when he gave a trove of classified material to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks to publish online. But Army Col. Denise Lind found the onetime Marylander not guilty of aiding the enemy - the most serious charge brought by the government, which carries a possible life sentence. Manning, 25, could still be sentenced to decades in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of war logs, diplomatic cables and battlefield video footage in the largest security breach in U.S. history.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- With the CIA and FBI determined to learn whether Aldrich H. Ames had confederates inside the intelligence agency, the accused man is showing his first willingness to cooperate with investigators -- but only if they recommend leniency for his wife, the Los Angeles Times learned yesterday.But Mr. Ames has virtually no chance of negotiating leniency for himself, considering the damage investigators believe the 31-year CIA veteran caused to U.S. intelligence interests and his possible complicity in the deaths of U.S. intelligence operatives in Russia.
NEWS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,Chicago Tribune | August 27, 2006
Paul Salopek, a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune, was charged with espionage and two other criminal counts in a Sudanese court yesterday, three weeks after he was detained by pro-government forces in the province of Darfur. Salopek, 44, who was on a freelance assignment for National Geographic magazine, was arrested with two Chadian citizens, his interpreter and driver. If convicted, they could be imprisoned for years. Chicago Tribune editor Ann Marie Lipinski called Salopek "one of the most accomplished and admired journalists of our time.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Federal authorities have arrested a career employee of the CIA on charges that he passed highly classified information to Russia for several years, law enforcement officials said yesterday.Officials said the CIA employee was arrested Saturday in Virginia after what they called one of the most important and tightly controlled espionage investigations during the Clinton administration.The officials said the nature of the information that had been passed on was not yet clear, but they suspected the employee had access to an array of security information about the former Eastern bloc.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Laura Barnhardt and Tim Craig and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
Baltimore County police are investigating whether an Anne Arundel County police officer, charged with assaulting his wife, might have been planning to go into business as a hit man. The officer, Stephen M. Brown, is charged only with three counts of second-degree assault based on a complaint from his wife. But his bail was revoked this week after police found papers in Brown's house indicating that someone had an interest in corporate espionage and killings for hire. Brown, an 11-year police veteran who was a detective in Anne Arundel County's Western District, is being held at the Baltimore County Detention Center.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 10, 1997
Commercial spy satellites are about to let anyone with a credit card peer down from the heavens into the compounds of dictators or the back yards of neighbors with high fences.The first satellite is scheduled to fly into orbit in April or May, another in December and perhaps a dozen during the next decade. The launchings will end a monopoly that advanced nations held for nearly four decades on orbital espionage.Rivaling military spy craft in the sharpness of their photos, the new American-made satellites are designed to see objects as small as a yard or so in diameter -- cars and hot tubs, for example.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- One side accuses the other of hyping allegations of Chinese espionage to the point of absurdity. The other fires back that its accusers are ignoring the facts out of sympathy for the Chinese Communist Party.If it was just another partisan cat fight, it would go virtually unnoticed. But when conservative gadfly and 1996 Republican vice presidential candidate Jack Kemp squares off with GOP Rep. Christopher Cox, the chairman of the House committee on Chinese espionage, the battle gets a little more interesting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 5, 2012
“Civilization 5: Gods and Kings” Firaxis PC/Mac Rating: 3 out of 4 “Don't talk about money, politics or religion.” It's an adage as old as Emily Post herself, and one that “Civilization 5” had no problem breaking two thirds of for the last couple of years. With “Gods and Kings,” the new expansion pack for the game, “Civ 5” crushes the final taboo of polite society and uses it as a formidable layer to an already stellar game.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
Legislation drafted by Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin to update the 1917 Espionage Act has angered public disclosure advocates who say the proposal would make it harder for federal employees to expose government fraud and abuse. The bill would clarify a murky area of law to ensure that anyone who publicly leaks classified material could be prosecuted criminally, which is not necessarily the case today. The proposal also would make it illegal for government employees to violate nondisclosure agreements.
NEWS
By Mary Pat Flaherty, The Washington Post | September 7, 2011
Stewart D. Nozette of Chevy Chase was a gifted scientist privy to America's top secrets. On Wednesday, he admitted trying to sell those secrets to a foreign government. With his guilty plea to attempted espionage, the astrophysicist was rebranded a would-be traitor. Nozette, 54, stood in an orange prison jumpsuit in the District of Columbia's federal court as he conceded that he had accepted $11,000 in cash in 2009 in exchange for passing classified materials about U.S. satellite defense systems to a person Nozette believed was an Israeli intelligence officer.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
Years of government pursuit came to an end Friday when former NSA employee Thomas Drake pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor count of "exceeding the authorized use of a computer" — a quiet conclusion to an aggressive espionage case. Drake, who warned government investigators about wasteful National Security Agency programs, was indicted last year for passing information to a Baltimore Sun reporter in 2006 and 2007. He could have received up to 35 years in federal prison under a combination of criminal charges, including violation of the Espionage Act, yet he was never charged with leaking classified information.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
Former National Security Agency employee Thomas Drake accepted a plea deal Thursday that cleared him of espionage charges stemming from an alleged leak of classified information to a Baltimore Sun reporter who wrote about waste and mismanagement at the intelligence-gathering operation at Fort Meade. Drake, who was scheduled for trial in federal court in Baltimore on Monday, instead is to plead guilty today to a misdemeanor charge that he exceeded the authorized use of a computer. The government dropped 10 more serious felony charges that could have sent him to prison for as long as 35 years, and he is now expected to serve no prison time.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
A criminal charge filed against former NSA employee Thomas Drake, claiming that he kept a particular classified document, will stand even though the text was stamped "unclassified," a federal court judge ruled late Monday. Drake's lawyers, both federal public defenders, argued last week that the charge should be dismissed because the document, a meeting schedule posted on the agency's private intranet, was widely distributed and clearly marked as not-confidential. But in a three-page opinion, U.S. District Court Judge Richard D. Bennett disagreed, calling the request "premature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
F ew subjects can as reliably command readership as do books on espionage. Each year hundreds appear, both fiction and nonfiction, tapping a limitless fascination with the black art. Readers seem as avid to find the dagger under the cloak as the spies themselves, often having lived for years under cover, are eager to reveal what they have done, or as historians and journalists are determined to uncover their stories. The effectiveness of espionage is the subject of endless debate. For instance, it can be argued that during the Cold War, while the United States was well-informed by its intelligence community on Soviet force levels and nuclear capability, U.S. intelligence failed miserably to predict the humiliation of the Bay of Pigs invasion and, later, the fall of the Soviet Union, and, with a budget of about $30 billion, it could not put together numerous clues that might have provided forewarning of Sept.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 28, 2007
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Iran's judiciary acquitted a moderate former government official of espionage charges yesterday, prompting vehement criticism by supporters of hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and escalating the infighting within Iran's leadership. Authorities had charged Hossein Mousavian, Iran's former nuclear negotiator and confidant of pragmatist cleric Ayatollah Hashemi Rafsanjani, with divulging state secrets to foreign countries this year. But the judiciary announced that the Revolutionary Court was clearing him of a pair of espionage charges, while convicting him of a far lesser charge of propagating against the system, a security charge often handed to journalists.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
A federal judge said Thursday that he would allow Baltimore Sun articles about program and management problems at the National Security Agency to be admitted as evidence in the June trial of Thomas Drake, a former NSA employee accused of retaining classified documents to give to a reporter. But the judge stopped short of allowing the reporter, identified in court papers as former Sun journalist Siobhan Gorman, to be called to the witness stand. District Judge Richard D. Bennett said that path could end in a "deep, dark hole," and that he's not inclined to jail reporters for refusing to reveal sources.
TRAVEL
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | May 18, 2008
THE NATIONAL MALL AND ITS MONuments. The cherry blossoms. The National Archives. The Georgetown waterfront. The museums at Smithsonian Institution. The monotony. Washington, D.C., is a great weekend getaway town, but after a few visits, many of its traditional attractions ultimately fall under the heading of "been there, done that." Fortunately, the city has a plethora of new attractions dedicated to such institutions as journalism, law enforcement and science. That's why as soon as the Washington weather turned warm, I opted for a weekend there with my 11-year-old daughter Nyaniso in tow, discovering the city's new offerings while adhering to a $500 budget.
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