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Esophageal Cancer

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By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | April 6, 2009
The back of the T-shirt everyone was wearing Sunday said it all: "Heartburn can cause cancer." The Mordecai family didn't know that when John "Monte" Mordecai was diagnosed two years ago with esophageal cancer. He died less than a year later at age 63. In his honor - and ultimately in his memory - his daughter Mara, now 13, wanted to spread the word about this deadly disease, one that claims nearly all who are diagnosed with it, in the hope that no one else would have to lose their father to something that could have been caught sooner if only he had known to be on the lookout.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
A son of Hollywood royalty will be in Baltimore this week, lending his support in the fight against the disease that killed his father 55 years ago. Stephen Bogart, the son of acting legends Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, will be in town Oct. 24 to film a promotional spot for the Esophageal Cancer Action Network (ECAN), a three-year-old Baltimore-based non-profit promoting early detection and treatment of the disease. Humphrey Bogart, star of “Casablanca” and an Oscar-winner for “The African Queen,” died of esophageal cancer in 1957, when his son was just 8. Stephen Bogart, 63, will be taping a movie trailer and public service announcement at the MPT studios in Owings Mills.
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NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | January 19, 2009
Please help me. I am 35 years old and have been addicted to Argo Corn Starch for the past four years. How can I stop eating it? It makes my mouth dry and my limbs cramp. I have mood swings and have gained weight. But just knowing I shouldn't eat starch is not enough. Please see a doctor and ask to be tested for iron or zinc deficiency. Pica, compulsively eating a substance that is not food, is frequently associated with such a mineral deficiency and often goes away when the deficiency is corrected.
NEWS
December 31, 2011
It saddens me to see how much trouble St. Joseph Medical Center has been in recently ("Midei case leaves future unclear for St. Joseph Medical Center," Dec. 29). Some of it surely was due to mismanagement. But as a patient, I would like to share what St. Joseph's means to the patients and their families. When you are really in trouble physically - in my case, Stage III esophageal cancer - you want the top doctors and a caring staff that feels like family. I have seen a close friend battle Stage IV lung cancer, and she is still here thanks to the excellent care she received from doctors at the facility.
NEWS
September 16, 1995
C. Richard TaylorHarvard professorC. Richard Taylor, 56, a professor of biology at Harvard University who studied why prehistoric kangaroos survived the advent of man and why certain antelopes almost never drink, died on Sunday in Concord, Mass., where he lived.Tom Helmore, 91, a debonair Broadway and film actor in the 1940s and '50s, died Tuesday in Longboat Key, Fla. On stage and in films, he specialized in comedies, playing opposite Ginger Rogers, among others.Wilson Desir, 57, a Haitian consul general in New York who was exiled from his homeland for two decades, died Wednesday of complications from diabetes in New York.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
A son of Hollywood royalty will be in Baltimore this week, lending his support in the fight against the disease that killed his father 55 years ago. Stephen Bogart, the son of acting legends Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, will be in town Oct. 24 to film a promotional spot for the Esophageal Cancer Action Network (ECAN), a three-year-old Baltimore-based non-profit promoting early detection and treatment of the disease. Humphrey Bogart, star of “Casablanca” and an Oscar-winner for “The African Queen,” died of esophageal cancer in 1957, when his son was just 8. Stephen Bogart, 63, will be taping a movie trailer and public service announcement at the MPT studios in Owings Mills.
NEWS
June 1, 2009
Study: Heat effective in treating throat condition Zapping away abnormal, precancerous cells in the throat may lower the risk of later developing esophageal cancer, the first major study to test this technique finds. In a study of 127 people suffering from a heartburn-related problem known as Barrett's esophagus, only about 1 percent who had a procedure that uses heat to burn off precancerous spots went on to develop cancer over the next year. That's compared with more than 9 percent of those who got a fake treatment in which no cells were destroyed.
NEWS
June 6, 2003
Paul E. Connolly, a former gasoline station dealers representative and community activist, died Saturday at Lynchburg General Hospital in Virginia of esophageal cancer and other ailments. He was 69. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Connolly graduated from Loyola High School in 1951, then Loyola College. As a member of a family of activists, he was involved with the Community Council of Govans working to integrate neighborhoods. He also co-owned with his mother a neighborhood shop that sold religious articles.
NEWS
August 15, 2007
Madeline M. Potter, who worked in the classified advertising department of The Baltimore Sun for nearly three decades and then had a part-time second career in her retirement, died Saturday of esophageal cancer at her daughter's Parkton home. She was 82. Madeline Margaret O'Brien was born in Boston and moved to Pennington Avenue in Curtis Bay with her family in 1937. After graduating from Southern High School in 1942, she went to work in the automobile insurance department of U.S. Fidelity & Guaranty Co. in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
December 31, 2011
It saddens me to see how much trouble St. Joseph Medical Center has been in recently ("Midei case leaves future unclear for St. Joseph Medical Center," Dec. 29). Some of it surely was due to mismanagement. But as a patient, I would like to share what St. Joseph's means to the patients and their families. When you are really in trouble physically - in my case, Stage III esophageal cancer - you want the top doctors and a caring staff that feels like family. I have seen a close friend battle Stage IV lung cancer, and she is still here thanks to the excellent care she received from doctors at the facility.
NEWS
June 1, 2009
Study: Heat effective in treating throat condition Zapping away abnormal, precancerous cells in the throat may lower the risk of later developing esophageal cancer, the first major study to test this technique finds. In a study of 127 people suffering from a heartburn-related problem known as Barrett's esophagus, only about 1 percent who had a procedure that uses heat to burn off precancerous spots went on to develop cancer over the next year. That's compared with more than 9 percent of those who got a fake treatment in which no cells were destroyed.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | April 6, 2009
The back of the T-shirt everyone was wearing Sunday said it all: "Heartburn can cause cancer." The Mordecai family didn't know that when John "Monte" Mordecai was diagnosed two years ago with esophageal cancer. He died less than a year later at age 63. In his honor - and ultimately in his memory - his daughter Mara, now 13, wanted to spread the word about this deadly disease, one that claims nearly all who are diagnosed with it, in the hope that no one else would have to lose their father to something that could have been caught sooner if only he had known to be on the lookout.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | January 19, 2009
Please help me. I am 35 years old and have been addicted to Argo Corn Starch for the past four years. How can I stop eating it? It makes my mouth dry and my limbs cramp. I have mood swings and have gained weight. But just knowing I shouldn't eat starch is not enough. Please see a doctor and ask to be tested for iron or zinc deficiency. Pica, compulsively eating a substance that is not food, is frequently associated with such a mineral deficiency and often goes away when the deficiency is corrected.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | September 2, 2008
Maria Gonzalez Buell, a native of Puerto Rico who taught Spanish in Baltimore County schools for two decades, died of esophageal cancer Aug. 26 at her home in the county's Hawthorne neighborhood. She was 88. Born Maria Gonzalez Carasquillo in Cayey, Puerto Rico, she was the fifth of 10 children. She moved to Baltimore in 1945 and went to work for the Veterans Administration. In 1951, she married Ellsworth Buell. She later earned a degree in education at what was then the Maryland State Teachers College at Towson.
NEWS
August 15, 2007
Madeline M. Potter, who worked in the classified advertising department of The Baltimore Sun for nearly three decades and then had a part-time second career in her retirement, died Saturday of esophageal cancer at her daughter's Parkton home. She was 82. Madeline Margaret O'Brien was born in Boston and moved to Pennington Avenue in Curtis Bay with her family in 1937. After graduating from Southern High School in 1942, she went to work in the automobile insurance department of U.S. Fidelity & Guaranty Co. in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By SHARI ROAN and SHARI ROAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 14, 2006
Heartburn, that almost quintessential American medical malady, appears to be driving the nation's fastest-increasing type of cancer. And the antacids used to ease the symptoms could, in some cases, do more harm than good. The cancer, a type of esophageal disease called adenocarcinoma, is relatively rare. However, incidence has jumped sixfold in the past 30 years. No one knows exactly why esophageal cancer is on the rise, but experts say heartburn is the natural suspect. About 60 million Americans have occasional symptoms of heartburn -- a burning feeling in the chest, regurgitation and nausea.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | September 2, 2008
Maria Gonzalez Buell, a native of Puerto Rico who taught Spanish in Baltimore County schools for two decades, died of esophageal cancer Aug. 26 at her home in the county's Hawthorne neighborhood. She was 88. Born Maria Gonzalez Carasquillo in Cayey, Puerto Rico, she was the fifth of 10 children. She moved to Baltimore in 1945 and went to work for the Veterans Administration. In 1951, she married Ellsworth Buell. She later earned a degree in education at what was then the Maryland State Teachers College at Towson.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2005
When local writer Jonathon Scott Fuqua lost a close friend to esophageal cancer in 2001, he dealt with his pain by penning a young-adult novel about a boy grappling with his father's imminent death from throat cancer. The book, The Willoughby Spit Wonder, was published in 2004 to rave reviews - only months before Fuqua found out that he, too, suffered from a throat ailment that was a precursor to the cancer that claimed his friend's life. As The Willoughby Spit Wonder hit bookstores, Fuqua was diagnosed with Barrett's Esophagus, a rare but preventable throat disease that can progress to cancer.
NEWS
By Ronald Kotulak and Ronald Kotulak,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 20, 2005
Researchers across the country are looking at whether cholesterol-lowering drugs taken by more than 25 million Americans might have an unexpected benefit: protection against a wide variety of cancers. Although the results from a growing number of preliminary studies on statins are lifting hopes for a broad-spectrum drug to prevent cancer, researchers warn against over-optimism, saying more research is needed. It's much too early for people to ask doctors for statins as a safeguard against cancer, they warn.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2005
When local writer Jonathon Scott Fuqua lost a close friend to esophageal cancer in 2001, he dealt with his pain by penning a young-adult novel about a boy grappling with his father's imminent death from throat cancer. The book, The Willoughby Spit Wonder, was published in 2004 to rave reviews - only months before Fuqua found out that he, too, suffered from a throat ailment that was a precursor to the cancer that claimed his friend's life. As The Willoughby Spit Wonder hit bookstores, Fuqua was diagnosed with Barrett's Esophagus, a rare but preventable throat disease that can progress to cancer.
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