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NEWS
December 27, 1994
Every non-English speaking child in Howard County cannot have his own personal translator. Yet there is far more that the school system can do than is being accomplished.Currently, Howard language teachers are assigned only part-time to schools in the system's English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program. Students sometimes receive as little as four hours a week of specialized language instruction. The strain on ESOL teachers, however, can't compare with the burden born by students who need such services and the families who want to help but are often stymied by language barriers themselves.
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NEWS
Staff Reports | June 23, 2014
The Baltimore Orioles have announced that Catherine Thorson of Annapolis is one of three teachers competing to represent the Orioles in the "Target Presents People All-Star Teachers" campaign, designed to honor teachers who make an impact on students and communities. Thorson is one of 90 finalists nationwide chosen by Major League Baseball, Target and People magazine for the contest. She's competing for online votes with two other teachers to represent the Orioles at the MLB All-Star Game.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
SALISBURY - Janet Baunhofer never knows quite what to expect from her pupils when it comes to language or literacy. Some might read well, yet not understand a word she says. Others might read right to left, or know the English alphabet phonetically, a series of sounds that have no meaning. A 10-year veteran who teaches ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) at two Worcester County elementary schools, Baunhofer spent the better part of the past two weeks with about 50 colleagues at Salisbury State University focusing on ways to better serve the burgeoning immigrant population in Delmarva schools.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
German Garduno led the commencement procession, and his first steps were a bit out of sync. Who could blame him? The last time the 32-year-old Columbia resident from Mexico attended a graduation of any kind was when he completed ninth grade at age 15. Tuesday night, Garduno joined a half-dozen other adults who received high school diplomas via Project Literacy, a Howard County Library educational initiative. Each took steps into uncharted territory that many adults take for granted — including no more worries about being denied a chance at jobs that require at least a high school diploma.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 4, 2002
When Columbia resident Karina Prizont Cowan was looking for a new job, the former Enron employee searched the Howard County Chamber of Commerce Web site and a listing caught her eye. The Board of Education was hiring staff members for its new Office of International Student Services (OISS). As a native of Argentina and a one-time exchange student to the United States, Cowan knew she could relate to families struggling to integrate into American public schools. International liaison On Oct. 28, the OISS opened with Cowan as its English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)
NEWS
February 19, 2003
ESOL office to hold education seminar for parents Tuesday The ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) Outreach Office, in cooperation with Howard County schools, will sponsor an Education Seminar for International Parents from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday at Hollifield Station Elementary School, Ellicott City. Topics to be discussed will include understanding report cards, reading levels and assessments, and elementary school ESOL programs. Information: Judy Do, 410-313-2546; Karina Cowan, 410-313-7102; Ming Sun, 410- 313-7142; and Samia Raja, 410- 313-2813.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2003
Cultural diversity is more than just a popular educational theme in Howard County - it is a reality. More than 1,500 county students receive ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) services. These children come from 81 countries and speak 73 languages. Many of them have parents who speak little English and are unfamiliar with how an American school system operates. "There are lots of things blocking them from helping their children," said Young-chan Han, ESOL family outreach liaison.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1995
Jun Lee isn't afraid to raise his hand in class this summer or to converse with the teacher, despite his limited proficiency in English.That's because the Korea-born youth and the other 15 students in a four-week class that ends today share a goal: All are foreign-born or have lived most of their lives abroad and need to improve their English skills.The summer course, offered by the county schools, has been helping them do that by giving them more instruction than they typically get during the school year.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun | September 27, 1991
Carolina Loyola and Yasumasa Deguchi sit on tiny blue chairs, mimicking the motions their tutor makes as she sings and points alternately to her head, shoulders, knees and toes.The 4-year-old prekindergarten students follow Gabrielle Lawrence's movements, but their faces reveal that they understand little of what she says. Carolina is from Colombia, Yasumasa from Japan. It is their first week at Wellwood $l Elementary School in the Pikesville area of Baltimore County.For these students, English is a second language.
NEWS
April 4, 1994
During the immigration explosion of the 1980s, more than million natives of other nations came to America, according to the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. That was as many as in the previous 20 years and about 13 percent of all immigrants to the United States from 1820 to 1990.Maryland wasn't immune to this boom. Some 150,000 foreigners made new homes here through the '80s. Most of them, reflecting the trend elsewhere in the country, were Latin Americans and Asians who settled in metropolitan areas.
NEWS
October 14, 2007
FIRN will hold a "Feast for Literacy" from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. tomorrow at Jesse Wong's Hong Kong Restaurant, 10215 Wincopin Circle, Columbia. The event will feature an Asian buffet, including appetizers, entrees, desserts, wine, beer, sodas and tea. The cost is $50. Those who attend can drop in at any time for the buffet. Proceeds will help support FIRN's Club LEAP, a program providing English training to children with limited skills in the language. Club LEAP (Learning English After-school Program)
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | September 14, 2007
"What have we been working on over the past few days?" teacher John Arnold asked the students in his Centennial High School ESOL class. "What kinds of words have we been learning?" There was a long pause as the three students - Gwan Young Moon, 15, Caylie Zhang, 14, and Steve Seo, 15 - groped for the answers. Finally, Seo, a native of Korea, spoke. "Nouns, verbs and adjectives," he said, speaking slowly. For the first time, Seo and about 25 other students who are not native English speakers can learn the language at Centennial, their neighborhood high school.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special To the Sun | July 8, 2007
A Glen Burnie High School teacher will spend six weeks in Morocco this fall, learning how students who speak French and Arabic soak up the nuances of yet another language -- English. Erin Sullivan, 32, was awarded an all-expenses-paid trip last month as part of the Fulbright Teacher and Administrator Exchange program operated by the U.S. State Department. She said she applied because she wanted to learn where her students in the school's rapidly expanding English for Speakers of Other Languages program get their drive and discipline.
NEWS
August 29, 2004
College offering ESOL courses throughout county Carroll Community College is offering free ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) classes for foreign-born adults who want to improve their English reading, writing and speaking skills. This fall, the college's ESOL program is expanding to meet the growing needs of students around the county with classes at locations in Westminster, Manchester and Sykesville. Classes are offered mornings and evenings, and child care is available at some sites.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2004
Starting this fall, Anne Arundel County students who previously took classes for non-native English speakers at their local high schools will attend one of three "international academies" - an effort by the school system to offer what it views as more efficient, specialized instruction. Students will travel from bus stops in their communities to Annapolis, Glen Burnie or Old Mill high schools and work on their English skills with full-time teachers based at those schools. "The move allows us to bring the students to the service," said schools Superintendent Eric J. Smith.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 2004
For many Arab families in Howard County, adjusting to the school system's culture isn't always easy. For example, Arab families are accustomed to a more formalized school system in their native countries, where parents are not directly involved in the classroom. But in Howard, as in many American school systems, parents can be seen often in the classroom, volunteering for reading programs and other events. To close that cultural gap, the outreach office of the county's English for Speakers of Other Languages program sponsored the first Arabic Family Night to help school officials and Arab families learn from one another.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2003
Cultural diversity is more than just a popular educational theme in Howard County - it is a reality. More than 1,500 county students receive ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) services. These children come from 81 countries and speak 73 languages. Many of them have parents who speak little English and are unfamiliar with how an American school system operates. "There are lots of things blocking them from helping their children," said Young-chan Han, ESOL family outreach liaison.
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