Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEsiason
IN THE NEWS

Esiason

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2007
NEW YORK -- Is Boomer Esiason, ex-quarterback and veteran NFL commentator, a fan of any football team? That's what his radio partner, Craig Carton, wants to know as they debate the psychology of New York Jets supporters. Sure, Esiason says. He loves one team truly and purely: his alma mater, the University of Maryland. More than 20 years after he last started a game for a team based in Maryland, Esiason maintains strong ties to the state. Though he grew up in New York, he was a Baltimore Colts fan weaned on the feats of Bert Jones.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
Just when you thought you couldn't possibly hate CBS Sports' coverage of the Baltimore Ravens more, along come Dan Marino and Boomer Esiason with their ignorant pre-game predictions Sunday. “I love the Bengals to come of age today,” Esiason said. “I think Baltimore's going to be the fifth seed,” Marino added. “Baltimore has not been a good road team all year.  And A.J. Green is coming back for Cincinnati. That means Pittsburgh's got to beat Cleveland, which I think will happen.  They will be the No. 2 seed, and Cincinnati gets in the playoffs today.”  Right, guys.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Paul Needell and Paul Needell,New York Daily News | January 19, 1994
NEW YORK -- The Boomer has finally lowered on the New York Jets.After declining to comment since former coach Bruce Coslet was fired by general manager Dick Steinberg 12 days ago, quarterback Boomer Esiason admitted yesterday that he kept his lips zipped because he was so unnerved by the firing of his "very dear friend" he feared saying something he might regret.But Esiason went on the offensive yesterday.He contended the "selfishness" of some Jets -- specifically wide receiver Rob Moore, tight end Johnny Mitchell and strong safety Brian Washington -- hurt Coslet in the eyes of management.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2011
Longtime Maryland supporters and one of the program's biggest former stars seem to be willing to give the Terps' new football coach, Randy Edsall, a chance. Yet many of them remained angry on Monday at the manner in which first-year athletic director Kevin Anderson got rid of former coach Ralph Friedgen, and some are disappointed that the Terps made what was considered a safe hire in the 52-year-old Edsall. They would have preferred to take a chance on resurrecting former Texas Tech coach Mike Leach's successful yet controversial career.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1996
One day after being benched for Sunday's game against the Washington Redskins, Arizona quarterback Boomer Esiason failed to practice yesterday and is requesting to be released."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | January 11, 1991
The AFC championship game in two weeks could hold a distinct, invigorating Maryland flavor. How would Boomer Esiason vs. Frank Reich tickle your Terrapin fancy?The prospect of a matchup of Maryland quarterbacks in the AFC title game remains alive, pending the outcome of this weekend's divisional playoff games and the status of Buffalo quarterback Jim Kelly's surgically repaired left knee.Esiason leads the Cincinnati Bengals against the Los Angeles Raiders Sunday at 4 p.m. Tomorrow, either Reich or Kelly will quarterback the Bills in their 12:30 p.m. showdown with the Miami Dolphins in Buffalo.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | November 25, 1992
The Cincinnati Bengals' youth movement finally claimed Boomer Esiason this week. Seven months after the Bengals drafted David Klingler as their quarterback of the future, they turned Esiason into a monument of the past.Coach David Shula expedited the Bengals' future when he announced that Klingler, the sixth pick in last April's draft, will start Sunday at home against the Pittsburgh Steelers. Shula made it clear that the job is Klingler's to keep."I've told Dave that he doesn't need to be looking over his shoulder," Shula said.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | September 20, 1991
HERNDON, Va. -- Eric Williams of the Washington Redskins says there is a lot to like about Cincinnati quarterback Boomer Esiason.There is his slingshot passing arm. There is his ability to dodge the pass rush and his ability to take a hit. There is his poise under pressure.But what Williams really respects about the former University of Maryland standout are his vocal chords. His booming, baritone vocal chords."He's so talented as a quarterback," Williams said yesterday. "He's like a general out on the field.
SPORTS
August 31, 1991
The Cincinnati Bengals plan to use a revised form of their no-huddle offense in tomorrow's season opener in Denver. The Bengals call it "The Tempo."It allows quarterback Boomer Esiason to call a play with a hand gesture or a single word."
SPORTS
October 24, 1991
Boomer Esiason doesn't expect to be able to quarterback the Cincinnati Bengals when they play the Houston Oilers on Sunday, and if he's right, his string of consecutive starts would end at 37.Esiason suffered a slight separation of his left shoulder in Monday night's loss to the Buffalo Bills.'I'd like to think I'd be back in a few days but, realistically, no. . . . If it was anything else, I'd be in there," Esiason said."If it was my other shoulder, I'd definitely be playing this week. But because it's my throwing arm, I have to be really careful.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2007
NEW YORK -- Is Boomer Esiason, ex-quarterback and veteran NFL commentator, a fan of any football team? That's what his radio partner, Craig Carton, wants to know as they debate the psychology of New York Jets supporters. Sure, Esiason says. He loves one team truly and purely: his alma mater, the University of Maryland. More than 20 years after he last started a game for a team based in Maryland, Esiason maintains strong ties to the state. Though he grew up in New York, he was a Baltimore Colts fan weaned on the feats of Bert Jones.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2001
Back in 1984, Stan Gelbaugh considered himself just another talented University of Maryland quarterback trying to help the Terrapins win, while hoping to survive long enough to throw a football for a living in the NFL. Gelbaugh would go on to draw a paycheck for 11 seasons, primarily as a backup in Buffalo and Seattle. And by the time he retired in 1996, Gelbaugh knew he had blossomed at an unlikely time, during an era that smiled unusually on the quarterbacks who paraded through College Park.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Christian Ewell and Don Markus and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
COLLEGE PARK - Georgia Tech offensive coordinator Ralph Friedgen has been offered the head football coaching job at Maryland, sources close to the Terrapins program and to Friedgen said last night. It is not known whether Friedgen will accept the offer. Sources close to Friedgen indicated he was trying to make sure the commitment he received from Maryland was enough to quickly turn around the moribund program. It wasn't so much the financial package he was offered, the sources said, but the money being put into the program to make it competitive with the rest of the Atlantic Coast Conference.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | March 9, 2000
Just five weeks after they worked the Super Bowl for the network, ABC yesterday dismissed former Maryland quarterback Boomer Esiason as its "Monday Night Football" analyst, as well as longtime producer Ken Wolfe and director Craig Janoff. The network announced that it will bring back one of the founding fathers of "MNF," Don Ohlmeyer, who produced the show during its halcyon days when Frank Gifford, Don Meredith and Howard Cosell worked the booth. " `Monday Night Football' is a part of the fabric of my being," said Ohlmeyer, who headed the entertainment division of NBC for most of the 1990s.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | January 31, 2000
If the first half of yesterday's Super Bowl was a collection of near-misses for the St. Louis offense, the ABC telecast of the game, from pre-game to conclusion, was equally imperfect. The network turned in a professional effort, certainly no worse than Fox's performance last year, and the second half was stellar. But you just felt that the broadcast should have been better. Start in the Georgia Dome announce booth, where play-by-play man Al Michaels and analyst Boomer Esiason tripped over each other throughout the evening.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1999
COLLEGE PARK -- Time stood still yesterday at the University of Maryland as a blond, brash left-handed quarterback named Boomer Esiason returned to campus to speak to 4,000 graduates at the winter commencement ceremonies at Cole Field House.Except for a few creases in his his face, Esiason, 38, looked and acted a lot like the cocky 18-year-old youngster from East Islip, N.Y., who came to Maryland in 1979 and immediately clashed with coach Jerry Claiborne, who's now in the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | September 21, 1999
Though he spent three hours in the "Monday Night Football" booth last night, ABC analyst Boomer Esiason's most astute observations yesterday came during his appearance on Don Imus' morning radio show.Esiason, on the phone from Dallas, the site of last night's game, chuckled at the thought of the overwrought Sunday NFL pre-game shows, and wondered aloud, "What's going on?"Esiason spoke specifically of Terry Bradshaw's tear-filled chat with Green Bay's Brett Favre and his wife, Deanna, over the quarterback's problems with drinking and prescription drugs.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLLINO | November 27, 1994
Boomer Esiason was an 8-year-old fan growing up on Long Island when Joe Namath guaranteed victory for the New York Jets in Super Bowl III over the Baltimore Colts and then pulled it off.Esiason never dreamed that one day he would become good friends with Namath and follow in his footsteps as the Jets' quarterback."
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | September 21, 1999
Though he spent three hours in the "Monday Night Football" booth last night, ABC analyst Boomer Esiason's most astute observations yesterday came during his appearance on Don Imus' morning radio show.Esiason, on the phone from Dallas, the site of last night's game, chuckled at the thought of the overwrought Sunday NFL pre-game shows, and wondered aloud, "What's going on?"Esiason spoke specifically of Terry Bradshaw's tear-filled chat with Green Bay's Brett Favre and his wife, Deanna, over the quarterback's problems with drinking and prescription drugs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.