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Eruv

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By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
An eruv is a ritual zone typically marked by wire or string that makes certain activities otherwise forbidden on the Sabbath possible for Orthodox Jews. There are numerous restrictions on activities on the Sabbath, which runs from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday, related to a prohibition on working on what's supposed to be a day of rest. For example, carrying keys, money or even babies - even pushing children in a stroller - is prohibited. But an eruv expands the private walls of the home, relaxing those restrictions.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
An eruv is a ritual zone typically marked by wire or string that makes certain activities otherwise forbidden on the Sabbath possible for Orthodox Jews. There are numerous restrictions on activities on the Sabbath, which runs from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday, related to a prohibition on working on what's supposed to be a day of rest. For example, carrying keys, money or even babies - even pushing children in a stroller - is prohibited. But an eruv expands the private walls of the home, relaxing those restrictions.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Isaac Hametz doesn't identify as an Orthodox Jew, and neither do many of the Jewish people living in downtown. But the 30-year-old was enlisted by the leader of Lloyd Street's B'nai Israel congregation for a singularly Orthodox quest: Determine how to create a downtown eruv, a ritual zone typically marked by wire or string that makes possible certain activities otherwise forbidden on the Sabbath. Rabbi Etan Mintz, who joined B'nai Israel in August 2012, said an eruv is critical to helping the 140-year-old congregation attract and retain families, and ultimately re-establish itself as the center of a thriving downtown Jewish community.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Isaac Hametz doesn't identify as an Orthodox Jew, and neither do many of the Jewish people living in downtown. But the 30-year-old was enlisted by the leader of Lloyd Street's B'nai Israel congregation for a singularly Orthodox quest: Determine how to create a downtown eruv, a ritual zone typically marked by wire or string that makes possible certain activities otherwise forbidden on the Sabbath. Rabbi Etan Mintz, who joined B'nai Israel in August 2012, said an eruv is critical to helping the 140-year-old congregation attract and retain families, and ultimately re-establish itself as the center of a thriving downtown Jewish community.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
Most city residents haven't noticed the thin lines added to telephone poles in North Baltimore, creating a nearly invisible perimeter around the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus and surrounding neighborhoods. But for the Orthodox Jews who live within those neighborhoods, the wires create a symbolic wall, or eruv, which allows them to carry loads on the Sabbath within its borders. "It is the type of thing that anyone who doesn't need it won't notice," said Rabbi Binyamin Marwick of the Orthodox Union.
NEWS
By ROBERT A. ERLANDSON and ROBERT A. ERLANDSON,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
The hot line telephone started ringing just after noon yesterday as concerned Orthodox Jews checked that the Baltimore County eruv is intact so they can enjoy a relaxed Sabbath.Shmuel Siegel, 18, who spent more than two hours checking the boundaries, assured callers that all was well.Since last spring, the eruv, a symbolic enclosure, has bounded a large area of northwestern Baltimore County. Created to help attract more Orthodox Jews to the county, the eruv establishes a "private domain" in which Sabbath restrictions against "work" from sundown Friday until sundown Saturday are relaxed -- very slightly.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
Because of Bert Miller, life has been far easier for thousands of Orthodox Jews in Northwest Baltimore for the last 13 years.It was Dr. Miller who in 1981 spearheaded the creation of the eruv, a special 16-square-mile area in which some of the strict religious rules governing Orthodox behavior on the Sabbath could be slightly relaxed. And it was Dr. Miller who labored strenuously through the years to maintain the boundaries of the eruv and to publish a directory of its residents.In light of that unquestioned record of service and effort, a grateful community never bothered to examine the internal operations of the eruv or to question Dr. Miller's decisions.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1995
An ancient, God-centered way of life is thriving in Baltimore beyond anyone's expectations. Or prayers.As old as Moses and as fresh as the kosher pizza sold on Reisterstown Road, Orthodox Judaism is booming here."
BUSINESS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | September 25, 1994
Upper Park Heights carries an unmistakable Jewish stamp: more than a dozen synagogues line Park Heights Avenue, and every Saturday hundreds of Orthodox Jewish walk to services.But at this time of year, the neighborhood's Jewish identity is magnified. On the Jewish New Year and on Yom Kippur, more people than usual attend synagogue. The streets around the synagogues are flooded with cars, and traffic jams form after services.And in the last two weeks, dozens of temporary buildings have sprung up around the neighborhood, each known as a Sukkah and used to celebrate the holiday of Sukkot, which began last week and concludes Tuesday.
NEWS
May 25, 1992
Today's 75th anniversary of the Talmudical Academy is a reminder of the significant role the Orthodox Jewish community plays in Baltimore. If anything, that role is getting more pronounced. Baltimore is said to have the largest percentage of Orthodox Jews of any American city and each year some 150 additional families move in, mostly from New York.Several reasons explain Baltimore's attraction for these religious families. Houses here are often relative bargains for large, young families.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
Most city residents haven't noticed the thin lines added to telephone poles in North Baltimore, creating a nearly invisible perimeter around the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus and surrounding neighborhoods. But for the Orthodox Jews who live within those neighborhoods, the wires create a symbolic wall, or eruv, which allows them to carry loads on the Sabbath within its borders. "It is the type of thing that anyone who doesn't need it won't notice," said Rabbi Binyamin Marwick of the Orthodox Union.
NEWS
By ROBERT A. ERLANDSON and ROBERT A. ERLANDSON,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
The hot line telephone started ringing just after noon yesterday as concerned Orthodox Jews checked that the Baltimore County eruv is intact so they can enjoy a relaxed Sabbath.Shmuel Siegel, 18, who spent more than two hours checking the boundaries, assured callers that all was well.Since last spring, the eruv, a symbolic enclosure, has bounded a large area of northwestern Baltimore County. Created to help attract more Orthodox Jews to the county, the eruv establishes a "private domain" in which Sabbath restrictions against "work" from sundown Friday until sundown Saturday are relaxed -- very slightly.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
Because of Bert Miller, life has been far easier for thousands of Orthodox Jews in Northwest Baltimore for the last 13 years.It was Dr. Miller who in 1981 spearheaded the creation of the eruv, a special 16-square-mile area in which some of the strict religious rules governing Orthodox behavior on the Sabbath could be slightly relaxed. And it was Dr. Miller who labored strenuously through the years to maintain the boundaries of the eruv and to publish a directory of its residents.In light of that unquestioned record of service and effort, a grateful community never bothered to examine the internal operations of the eruv or to question Dr. Miller's decisions.
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA | January 28, 1995
"Coming soon,'' the sign says, ''17 luxury homes starting at $279,000."And this is Baltimore City?The real-estate market elsewhere in the city may be flat, but Bruce Scherr foresees no difficulty selling the houses he is about build near Bonnie View Country Club. The reason: the upscale homes are within walking distance of a dynamic Orthodox synagogue.''Fruppie houses,'' quips a neighbor, playing with the words ''yuppie'' and frum (observant).Major demographic shifts are taking place in Baltimore's Jewish community.
NEWS
By James Bock | September 8, 1991
The schools are strapped, the budget is busted and the crime rate is murder. Who could consider Baltimore a land of milk and honey?Orthodox Jews could -- and do.Take Jerry and Elka Rottman and their three children. Today at sundown, the Rottmans usher in a new Jewish year -- and a new stage in their lives -- in Northwest Baltimore.When they dip their Rosh Hashana challah in honey to welcome the year 5752, it will be in the spacious three-bedroom home in Upper Park Heights they moved into 10 days ago. They gladly left behind an overpriced $1,350-a-month rental in Queens, N.Y.The Rottmans are by no means alone.
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