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NEWS
August 22, 1996
A picture in the editions of Sunday, Aug. 11, erroneously identified Taylor's Meats as Nunnally Bros. Meats.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/22/96
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
North Carroll Middle School was flooded with phone calls Tuesday after an erroneous news report that a student had shot and killed herself inside the Hampstead school. A 13-year-old girl at North Carroll Middle had committed suicide off school grounds, and school officials said teachers and counselors were talking to students about the loss of a fellow student during morning classes. Dana Falls, director of student services for Carroll County Public Schools, said that shortly after noon, the school received a flood of calls from parents worried about the reports of violence.
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NEWS
September 14, 1994
The In the Nation column yesterday erroneously reported tha former naval officer Paula Coughlin had reached a settlement with the Navy over alleged sexual abuse at a Tailhook convention. She reached a settlement with the Tailhook Association, as the article reported. The Associated Press erroneously added the Navy as part of her lawsuit.The Sun regrets the errors.FTC
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Some future city workers will receive a 401(k)-style retirement plan rather than traditional pensions under a sweeping plan approved Monday by the City Council. The legislation - the result of a deal struck by Baltimore unions and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake - was stalled in a council committee for nearly a year until the mayor and union leader Glenard S. Middleton reached what both sides called a compromise. Rawlings-Blake initially called for all new municipal workers to be placed in a 401(k)
NEWS
December 30, 1998
A photo caption on the Dec. 26 editorial page erroneously suggested that Paul J. Marks is the architect studying residential possibilities for the Woman's Industrial Exchange.The Sun regrets the error.Pub date: 12/30/98
NEWS
August 8, 1996
In yesterday's editions, an Associated Press article erroneously referred to the victim in a fatal personal watercraft accident as a woman. Roxanne Marie Bedell was 13.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 8/08/96
NEWS
May 5, 1996
Angel Wallenda: The Associated Press reported erroneously Friday that Angel and Steven Wallenda performed as members of the Flying Wallendas. Steven Wallenda formed his own high-wire act and the couple were never members of the troupe once headed by his uncle and family patriarch, Karl Wallenda.Also, the Associated Press erroneously reported that Steven Wallenda and his 9-year-old son are Karl Wallenda's last direct descendants. One daughter and four grandchildren of Karl Wallenda still perform in separate acts.
NEWS
April 6, 1994
An Associated Press article carried in Monday's editions erroneously reported that the federal government spent an average of $4,599 for every American last year.The figure for fiscal 1993 actually was $4,814 per American. The $4,599 figure was the per capita amount spent in fiscal 1992.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
July 7, 1995
Because of incorrect information supplied by the Associated Press, an article in yesterday's editions erroneously reported the new postage rate for mail to foreign countries other than Canada and Mexico. The rate, which takes effect Sunday, is 60 cents for the first half-ounce and 40 cents for each additional half-ounce.* The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
June 14, 1997
An article yesterday on Annapolis mayoral candidate Carl O. Snowden's accounting of money raised through an annual dinner incorrectly reported the years covered by financial statements released Thursday. The years were 1994 through 1997. Also, a "Jr." was erroneously added to the name of the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson.The Sun regrets the errors.nTC Pub Date: 6/14/97
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
The Maryland General Assembly approved legislation Thursday that will provide new protections for motorists from erroneous tickets and other speed camera abuses, sending the bill to the governor for his expected signature. The compromise measure - two years in the making - requires jurisdictions to employ ombudsmen to void erroneous tickets before a trial and bans the so-called bounty system in which contractors are rewarded financially for issuing more tickets, though it does not apply to current contracts.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
The Senate voted unanimously Wednesday to approve legislation to tighten the rules under which local governments can use cameras to enforce speed laws, adding new protections for drivers against wrongly issued tickets. Similar legislation has passed the House. One of the chambers must pass the other's bill before it would go to Gov. Martin O'Malley for signature. The law would bar localities from signing new contracts with vendors under which the companies get a "bounty" for each ticket issued.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Baltimore's speed cameras likely charged motorists for thousands more erroneous tickets than previously disclosed, according to data from a secret audit conducted for the city last year and obtained by The Baltimore Sun. Consultant URS Corp. evaluated the camera system as run by Xerox State and Local Solutions in 2012 and found an error rate of more than 10 percent — 40 times higher than city officials have claimed. The city got those findings last April but never disclosed the high error rate, refusing calls by members of the City Council to release the audit.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
The Orioles continue their search for a new closer to replace Jim Johnson, but manager Buck Showalter said the club has yet to focus on a certain player. Earlier in the day, several media reports said that the Orioles were close to signing former Oakland Athletics closer Grant Balfour, but multiple industry sources have said that no offer has been made to Balfour. Showalter confirmed that Tuesday morning. “We talk about players,” Showalter said. “We talk about everybody, the same ones you all are talking about.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
Two Baltimore City Councilmen are formally calling on the state of Maryland to cover the costs of erroneous historic property tax credits that have cut revenue to the city over the past several years. Councilmen Bill Henry, who represents north Baltimore, and James Kraft, who represents southeast Baltimore, plan to introduce a resolution Monday that will call on the state to "find an appropriate mechanism whereby the city of Baltimore can be compensated for lost property tax revenue, so as not to negatively impact blameless homeowners and not unduly burden the city's finances because of flawed calculations used by the state.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Baltimore can't legally recoup more than $1.5 million in erroneous tax breaks given in recent years for renovations to historic commercial properties, finance director Harry E. Black said Wednesday. "Although those errors were identified, the city doesn't have the ability, legally, to go back and rebill those individuals," Black said. "They've already paid what they were billed. " Black's comments represent a departure from past efforts to collect undeserved tax credits. Officials had maintained they could issue revised tax bills going back seven years if they learned that a property tax bill was inaccurate — including for other tax credits that go primarily to homeowners.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Baltimore Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway Sr. reacted with disbelief upon hearing that an illegitimate tax break was inexplicably on the property tax bill for a rental home he owns in Northwest Baltimore — again. "No, it's not," he insisted recently to a reporter. Yet there it was, in black and white: City records showed Conaway wrongly received a $396 homestead credit on the house for the current tax year, which started last July. Conaway thought he'd resolved this issue for good.
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