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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
A Baltimore funeral home  is among those featured in an ESPN campaign from Academy-Award-winning director Errol Morris that launched today. The project, which includes 15-, 30- and 60-second trailers as well as a short documentary, looks at sports-themed funerals and fans who want to take their love of the games to the grave with them. The project is called "It's Not Crazy, It's Sports. " Morris visits the Kaczorowski Funeral Home in Dundalk where viewers get a look at an Orioles casket and hear about a Ravens-themed funeral.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
A Baltimore funeral home  is among those featured in an ESPN campaign from Academy-Award-winning director Errol Morris that launched today. The project, which includes 15-, 30- and 60-second trailers as well as a short documentary, looks at sports-themed funerals and fans who want to take their love of the games to the grave with them. The project is called "It's Not Crazy, It's Sports. " Morris visits the Kaczorowski Funeral Home in Dundalk where viewers get a look at an Orioles casket and hear about a Ravens-themed funeral.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 28, 1997
Happily, "Fast, Cheap & Out of Control" does not live up to its title. Luxuriously filmed with an unerring eye for the telling detail and juxtaposition, this fifth documentary by Errol Morris is a masterwork of the director's gift for portraiture.As he did in such classics as "Vernon, Florida," "Gates of Heaven" and "The Thin Blue Line," Morris illuminates the lives of his subjects with a bemused affection that veers toward worship as their obsessions come into focus.Morris' most structurally complex work to date, "Fast, Cheap & Out of Control" is at once a tender exploration of human nature and a celebration of Americana at its most gaudy and eccentric.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 27, 2004
As insightful a political document as is likely to emerge this year, election or no, The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons From the Life of Robert S. McNamara offers a primer in all sorts of areas, from the hubris of power to the danger of war in a nuclear age to something as seemingly mundane as being man enough to admit when you were wrong. Beyond being an invaluable tool for budding political scientists, it's an eye-opening piece of history and would be a classic Horatio Alger success story, had Alger concentrated on careers in public service.
NEWS
By ROBERT BURRUSS | December 29, 1993
Kensington. -- The movies of Frederick Wiseman mostly have short titles, such as ''Hospital,'' ''High School,'' ''Central Park,'' ''Titicut Follies'' and ''Meat.''I don't like Mr. Wiseman's movies. The ones I've seen are in black and white, and they have no narration or background music; they require active attention which removes them from the entertainment documentary genre, which includes most nature movies and work of Errol Morris (''Thin Blue Line,'' ''Brief History of Time''). Mostly, though, Mr. Wiseman's movies are depressing -- wherein I suppose lies their merit in the relative morality of us liberals.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 27, 2004
As insightful a political document as is likely to emerge this year, election or no, The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons From the Life of Robert S. McNamara offers a primer in all sorts of areas, from the hubris of power to the danger of war in a nuclear age to something as seemingly mundane as being man enough to admit when you were wrong. Beyond being an invaluable tool for budding political scientists, it's an eye-opening piece of history and would be a classic Horatio Alger success story, had Alger concentrated on careers in public service.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 8, 1992
For centuries, deep thinkers have wrestled with the chicken-egg thing, as in, which came first? But "A Brief History of Time" asks a more interesting question: do men become what they study or do they study what they become?That's the pertinent issue regarding the "star" of "A Brief History of Time" (opening today at the Charles Theatre), the brilliant Cambridge theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, author of the best seller of the same name and current holder of a chair in physics once held by Sir Isaac Newton.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 8, 1992
Errol Morris would never be accused of taking the easy way out.After all, he once did a movie about a pet cemetery. Then he did a movie about a trashy drifter on death row in Texas who claimed he was innocent.And Morris proved he was innocent. And got him out. It was the now justly famous "Thin Blue Line."L And for his next trick . . . a movie on theoretical physics!The result, "A Brief History of Time," opening today at the Charles Theatre, is a chronicle of the life and ideas of Cambridge physicist Stephen Hawking, the world's leading expert on black holes and at the same time, a victim of a disabling disease that has kept him locked in a wheelchair, his limbs all but useless, his larynx removed, for most of his adult life.
FEATURES
By Robert W. Butler and Robert W. Butler,Kansas City Star | January 9, 1995
In the world of mystery fiction, Lawrence Block is a member of the nobility -- the creator of private eye Matt Scudder and a Grand Master of the Mystery Writers of America.But when it comes to seeing his literary creations come to life on the silver screen, Mr. Block is 0 for 2.Hollywood has twice made movies about Mr. Block's characters. In 1985 his Matt Scudder was played by Jeff Bridges in "8 Million Ways to Die." It was a bust.Not only was the setting changed from Scudder's mean streets of Manhattan to the palm-lined boulevards of Los Angeles, but also perhaps the motivating feature of Scudder's character (and fascination for readers)
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 19, 1992
Hollywood, as we all know, is a thumping engine of social change, always a step or two out in front of events, shaping our society as often as it reflects us. No other medium of communication has quite the power of the movies, and no art form is nearly so popular; the combination is wondrous and terrible to behold.So when Hollywood sniffs out a trend, the rest of us pay attention. What new theme have the elites discovered?Dogs. They are going to make many movies about dogs.I know what you're thinking: This means hounds.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 1, 2001
We are living in the golden age of television documentaries, and our lives are enriched immeasurably by the compelling stories that some of the best nonfiction filmmakers who ever lived are telling nightly on the small screen. I know in these post-postmodern times that golden ages are supposed to have existed only way back when, and that there is an audience of readers all too ready to embrace the proposition that television is mindless and/or evil - the boob tube and/or a plug-in drug responsible for addicting us to a culture of the silly and stupid.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 28, 1997
Happily, "Fast, Cheap & Out of Control" does not live up to its title. Luxuriously filmed with an unerring eye for the telling detail and juxtaposition, this fifth documentary by Errol Morris is a masterwork of the director's gift for portraiture.As he did in such classics as "Vernon, Florida," "Gates of Heaven" and "The Thin Blue Line," Morris illuminates the lives of his subjects with a bemused affection that veers toward worship as their obsessions come into focus.Morris' most structurally complex work to date, "Fast, Cheap & Out of Control" is at once a tender exploration of human nature and a celebration of Americana at its most gaudy and eccentric.
FEATURES
By Robert W. Butler and Robert W. Butler,Kansas City Star | January 9, 1995
In the world of mystery fiction, Lawrence Block is a member of the nobility -- the creator of private eye Matt Scudder and a Grand Master of the Mystery Writers of America.But when it comes to seeing his literary creations come to life on the silver screen, Mr. Block is 0 for 2.Hollywood has twice made movies about Mr. Block's characters. In 1985 his Matt Scudder was played by Jeff Bridges in "8 Million Ways to Die." It was a bust.Not only was the setting changed from Scudder's mean streets of Manhattan to the palm-lined boulevards of Los Angeles, but also perhaps the motivating feature of Scudder's character (and fascination for readers)
NEWS
By ROBERT BURRUSS | December 29, 1993
Kensington. -- The movies of Frederick Wiseman mostly have short titles, such as ''Hospital,'' ''High School,'' ''Central Park,'' ''Titicut Follies'' and ''Meat.''I don't like Mr. Wiseman's movies. The ones I've seen are in black and white, and they have no narration or background music; they require active attention which removes them from the entertainment documentary genre, which includes most nature movies and work of Errol Morris (''Thin Blue Line,'' ''Brief History of Time''). Mostly, though, Mr. Wiseman's movies are depressing -- wherein I suppose lies their merit in the relative morality of us liberals.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 19, 1992
Hollywood, as we all know, is a thumping engine of social change, always a step or two out in front of events, shaping our society as often as it reflects us. No other medium of communication has quite the power of the movies, and no art form is nearly so popular; the combination is wondrous and terrible to behold.So when Hollywood sniffs out a trend, the rest of us pay attention. What new theme have the elites discovered?Dogs. They are going to make many movies about dogs.I know what you're thinking: This means hounds.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 8, 1992
Errol Morris would never be accused of taking the easy way out.After all, he once did a movie about a pet cemetery. Then he did a movie about a trashy drifter on death row in Texas who claimed he was innocent.And Morris proved he was innocent. And got him out. It was the now justly famous "Thin Blue Line."L And for his next trick . . . a movie on theoretical physics!The result, "A Brief History of Time," opening today at the Charles Theatre, is a chronicle of the life and ideas of Cambridge physicist Stephen Hawking, the world's leading expert on black holes and at the same time, a victim of a disabling disease that has kept him locked in a wheelchair, his limbs all but useless, his larynx removed, for most of his adult life.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 1, 2001
We are living in the golden age of television documentaries, and our lives are enriched immeasurably by the compelling stories that some of the best nonfiction filmmakers who ever lived are telling nightly on the small screen. I know in these post-postmodern times that golden ages are supposed to have existed only way back when, and that there is an audience of readers all too ready to embrace the proposition that television is mindless and/or evil - the boob tube and/or a plug-in drug responsible for addicting us to a culture of the silly and stupid.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2000
'Divine Trash' "Divine Trash," Steven Yeager's award-winning documentary about the early career of Baltimore-based director John Waters, finally opens for a theatrical run at the historic Senator Theatre. Unrated. `High Fidelity' "High Fidelity" is a romantic comedy starring John Cusack as an impassioned record store owner whose obsession with music gets in the way of his relationship. Based on Nick Hornby's book and co-starring Iben Hjejle, Lisa Bonet and Joan Cusack. R. `Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter Jr.' "Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter Jr."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 8, 1992
For centuries, deep thinkers have wrestled with the chicken-egg thing, as in, which came first? But "A Brief History of Time" asks a more interesting question: do men become what they study or do they study what they become?That's the pertinent issue regarding the "star" of "A Brief History of Time" (opening today at the Charles Theatre), the brilliant Cambridge theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, author of the best seller of the same name and current holder of a chair in physics once held by Sir Isaac Newton.
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