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By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Anne Arundel County officials say a section of Race Road in Hanover will be closed for eight to 12 weeks for emergency repair, beginning Thursday morning at 10 a.m.. The county's Department of Public works will close the road between Hanover Road and Park Circle Drive, according to a press release. The area is near the Baltimore Washington Parkway and Route 100 near the Howard/Anne Arundel county line. The repair work is needed to stabilize a slope along Race Road that has been weakened by erosion from the nearby Deep Run stream and recent heavy storms, officials said.
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FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
Ever wonder why your neighborhood streams and rivers look so muddy after a heavy rain? A recent survey of construction sites in the Baltimore area found less than a quarter of the exposed soil being worked had been properly protected from erosion. The survey, involving staff and volunteers from 22 different environmental and community groups, found widely varying but generally poor controls on mud pollution being used at building sites in Baltimore City and the five surrounding counties.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
When it rains, not only does storm water flow downstream, but so do the banks of small streams emptying into Red Hill Branch, bringing other pollutants with the eroding soil. In a move to stem environmental problems and add wildlife habitat, Howard County has begun four restoration projects for the waterway in Ellicott City. Officials say they expect the work, which includes overhauling a storm-water pond and stabilizing more than 5,000 feet of the banks of three streams, to be completed by May. Project manager Mark Richmond said the pond behind Salterforth Place will go from being a depression that is dry most of the time to a larger pond that always has water.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 13, 2014
A day after heavy rains dumped more than 10 inches in parts of northern Anne Arundel County, State Highway Administration crews were still addressing weather-related road problems on Wednesday, including a roadway section in Pasadena that had washed away. Highway officials said a section of Waterford Road between Catherine Avenue and Old Baltimore Annapolis Boulevard would be closed at least until Thursday evening as crews work to rebuild it. Officials said engineers who inspected a culvert in the area after the storm found that soil under bridge abutments had washed away, creating a washout area about 15 feet deep, 10 feet wide and 24 feet long.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
The county has halted construction on a West River development, which had been exempted from most environmental rules, until it complies with erosion control laws.The county Department of Inspections and Permits issued a stop-work order Tuesday afternoon after an inspector confirmed neighbors' complaints about mud flowing into the street near Shady Side.John Peacock, chief of the county's environmental inspection program, said either the Florida-based developer, BMCN Joint Ventures Inc., or a subcontractor began grading and installing roads without the necessary erosion controls.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 9, 2009
The fight over who will review developers' erosion- and sediment-control plans and who will pay for that work entered a new phase Tuesday with the Howard County Council's unanimous approval of new fees for the services. The council's action means the independently run Howard County Soil Conservation District that does the work now can charge developers fees to pay the two employees who review the plans. Previously, the district used $220,000 in county funds - eliminated from the budget July 1. But the vote doesn't mean the issue is resolved.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2005
GROVE POINT - Jim Twohy's waterfront home might soon tumble into the Chesapeake Bay from atop a 60-foot cliff. He wants to build a wall to save the house, but some meddlesome neighbors are standing in the way. The neighbors are puritan tiger beetles, a threatened species half an inch long. To protect the bugs, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to stop construction of a rock barrier that Twohy and his civic association say is necessary to prevent a half-dozen houses from toppling into the water.
NEWS
November 26, 1992
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is reviewing a developer's plans to use stone, sand and salt-marsh grasses to control erosion along Sillery Bay in the Magothy River.G. W. Stone has sought a federal permit to construct a 180-foot stone revetment along property in the 1400 block of Rainbow Drive, backfill with sand and plant the area with the aquatic grasses. The site, which has a 200-foot pier, is opposite the Hunters Harbor Community Beach.The public can send comments to the Corps of Engineers through Dec. 21.Information: 962-4552.
NEWS
By The Los Angeles Times | February 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Vetiver is a coarse, stubborn grass that grows 6 feet tall, and under warm tropical sunlight may send roots down 12 feet or more. Its strength may present it with a bright future.The National Research Council has concluded that the little-known, if far-flung, grass could be a powerful weapon against a major environmental threat -- soil erosion from the wind-swept plains of the United States to the African sub-Sahara threatened by the expanding desert.The study was released last week.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | September 5, 1991
The state Board of Public Works awarded Annapolis $275,000 yesterdayto combat erosion and nutrient pollution along the banks of five small creeks feeding the Severn River.The money will be used to plant beach grasses, willows and other vegetation that absorb nutrients, as well as to construct rock and gravel barriers designed to limit erosion, said John Goheen, a spokesman with the state Department of theEnvironment.Grates will be installed at the ends of storm water pipes to catch trash and other debris before it reaches the stream, he said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Three light rail stations in North Baltimore reopened Thursday after being closed last week for repairs to an area of eroded soil near the transit system's tracks. The reopening of the Mount Washington, Cold Spring and Woodberry stations came about two weeks earlier than city officials originally estimated, significantly diminishing the inconvenience of to riders. "They were working very hard trying to make sure that they could finish before the July Fourth weekend, but nobody could ensure that," said Paulette Austrich, a Maryland Transit Administration spokeswoman, of the initial longer timeline.
NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Anne Arundel County officials say a section of Race Road in Hanover will be closed for eight to 12 weeks for emergency repair, beginning Thursday morning at 10 a.m.. The county's Department of Public works will close the road between Hanover Road and Park Circle Drive, according to a press release. The area is near the Baltimore Washington Parkway and Route 100 near the Howard/Anne Arundel county line. The repair work is needed to stabilize a slope along Race Road that has been weakened by erosion from the nearby Deep Run stream and recent heavy storms, officials said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Three light rail stations in North Baltimore — Mount Washington, Cold Spring and Woodberry — will be closed for three weeks of emergency repairs starting Friday as crews work to shore up significant track-side soil erosion, the Maryland Transit Administration said Wednesday. Rail service through the stations will be halted, and buses will shuttle riders between the Falls Road and North Avenue stations through July 11, the agency said. The closures overlap with a 13-game homestand by the Orioles at Oriole Park at Camden Yards downtown and the Inner Harbor's annual Fourth of July celebration — two major drivers of transit use to and from the suburbs north of the city.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 1, 2014
After much criticism from conservative quarters, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has decided, at least for now, to withdraw plans for its proposed study of how media organizations gather and report news. The expressed goal of the survey was to determine if the "critical information needs" of the public are being met. In making the announcement, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler indicated the survey would be "revised" and that the government agency had "no intention" of regulating political speech of journalists or other broadcasters.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Crews have reopened the right lane of eastbound Pulaski Highway in White Marsh after a discovery of erosion caused an emergency closure, the State Highway Administration said Thursday. The work involved back filling an area beneath the road south of White Marsh Boulevard, near the bridge that carries the highway over White Marsh Run, the SHA said. Initial estimates were that the work, which began Wednesday and disrupted traffic, could take several days. The state granted a $50,000 contract to Hunt Valley-based Brawner Builders to complete the repair work.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
The Howard County Department of Public Works will tap a grant from the Chesapeake Bay Trust Fund to repair and restore a stream in Ellicott City that officials say has been badly degraded by erosion. Richard Powell, a project manager with the department's stormwater division, said the project involves a roughly 300-foot stretch of the stream running along and under Tuscany Road near Lombardi Drive before emptying into the Little Patuxent River. The project is scheduled to begin around Aug. 12. Powell said construction will not affect traffic, but a portion of the sidewalk will be closed.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 19, 1991
SOUTH CHESAPEAKE BEACH -- In the spring of 1987, the year after Nanette and Jonathan Sheldon moved into their new home on a cliff overlooking the Chesapeake Bay, a neighbor's house fell into the water.Six months ago, a piece of concrete from another neighboring house's foundation dropped into the bay. And now the foundation of the Sheldons' home is cracked, and their front deck is halfway over the cliff.When their neighbor, Mary Bethune, first settled in the small South Chesapeake Beach community of Randle Cliff, in 1955, her front yard, supported by the cliff, extended out over the bay by more than 30 feet, almost as far as a nearby pier.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | May 23, 2013
Editor: I, like most everyone in the People's Republic of Maryland, have grown weary of "O'Taxes," which essentially translates to our esteemed governor taxing every aspect of our lives. While he's probably hard at work trying to determine a new tax on the very air we breathe, and trying to find a back door into the White House, his last insult, the rainwater run-off tax is laughable at best. First and foremost, it will do absolutely nothing to cleanse the waters of Chesapeake Bay, which despite the billions already spent, is in worse shape now that it was when the first studies were done more than a century ago. Yep, that money went mostly for studies.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
Having been raised in Baltimore, and lived in larger cities, it was with trepidation that I moved to the Eastern Shore many years ago. I have learned to appreciate the values, the culture and the hard work of the farmers and watermen who live here. Logically speaking, your opinion makes sense ("Smith Island denial," May 17). Erosion on Smith Island is a problem and is here to stay. However, if these people who care so much for their island and their way of life prefer to live on the island, then let them.
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