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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | March 22, 1994
Watching choreographer and performer Maureen Fleming is like watching a magician. She demands that we suspend our rational beliefs. Ms. Fleming and her solo work, "Eros," presented by Dance on the Edge at Towson State University during the weekend, astounded the audience with stunning imagery. It was part dance, part sculpture and part dream."Eros" consists of seven sections, loosely tied to the Greek myth of Eros and Psyche. Ms. Fleming's work is not narrative, but rather impressionistic and deeply rooted in the traditions of Japanese Butoh theater.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
NEAR is alive. The plucky little Maryland-built spacecraft that has been orbiting the asteroid Eros for the past year was supposed to have expired Monday on a kamikaze photography mission to the asteroid's surface. But against the odds, it has survived its impact with the surface. And it has called home. "Not only did the spacecraft survive, it's remained intact. We are still in communication with it," Jay Bergstrahl, NASA's acting director for solar system exploration, said yesterday.
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SPORTS
By MUPHEN WHITNEY | November 8, 1992
Eros is the god of love. Eros, the Belgian Warmblood stallion, certainly lives up to his name."Many of the people who call to breed their mares to him say that they fell in love with his picture," says Eros' part-owner Trina Bellak of Bethesda of the beguiling stallion with the expressive face.A former show-jumper, Eros is competing in dressage for Bellak and her partners Dee Dee and Peter Bierbrauer. The dark bay stallion stands at the Bierbrauer's Wind Crest Farm in Clarksburg.Eros is one of two stallions approved at the recent Belgian Warmblood Keuring (approval)
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2001
LAUREL - A tiny spacecraft from Maryland landed in the history books yesterday when it dropped gently onto the surface of a 21-mile-long asteroid orbiting 200 million miles from Earth. Snapping dozens of pictures as it descended, the unmanned Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft reached the asteroid Eros shortly after 3 p.m. EST. It marked the first time any spacecraft has landed on a small celestial body. NEAR's builders never designed it to land. It didn't even have landing gear.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
The Maryland-built NEAR spacecraft is circling the asteroid Eros at an altitude of as little as 12 miles - its closest approach since arriving at the ancient space rock in February. "This is the payoff time," said NEAR project scientist Andrew Cheng of the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab in Laurel. Thousands of photos sent back by NEAR have revealed the 21-mile-long asteroid to be a bleak and battered place, cratered by meteorites and strewn with jagged boulders the size of buildings.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
After orbiting the asteroid Eros for nearly a year, the Maryland-built NEAR spacecraft was to fire its thrusters today to begin a final series of low-altitude photographic passes over the bleak space rock, before ditching itself on the surface next month. If all goes well, NEAR will make five or six fly-bys over four days, the lowest, on Sunday, less than 9,000 feet above the surface. Scientists hope to get back detailed pictures that will answer their questions about poorly understood forces that seem to be eroding Eros' surface features.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
The Maryland-built NEAR spacecraft is back on track for a rendezvous with the asteroid Eros.But scientists at mission control in Laurel say it will arrive a year behind schedule and short of fuel after the unplanned shutdown of its main engine on Dec. 20.The fuel shortage may shorten the time available for scientists to study Eros.The engine failure has been blamed on a computer programming glitch, which scientists at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel say has been fixed with new computer instructions radioed to the spacecraft.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
NEAR is alive. The plucky little Maryland-built spacecraft that has been orbiting the asteroid Eros for the past year was supposed to have expired Monday on a kamikaze photography mission to the asteroid's surface. But against the odds, it has survived its impact with the surface. And it has called home. "Not only did the spacecraft survive, it's remained intact. We are still in communication with it," Jay Bergstrahl, NASA's acting director for solar system exploration, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1998
It's back.NASA's Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous spacecraft, built in Maryland and launched toward the Asteroid Belt almost two years ago, is zooming back toward a close encounter with Earth early tomorrow morning.The $108 million, 1,800-pound NEAR is returning for an energy boost and a course change toward its ultimate target, the asteroid Eros.It will also take snapshots and movies of Earth and calibrate its instruments as it soars within 333 miles of its home planet.Along the way, NEAR will be maneuvered to reflect flashes of sunlight onto more than a dozen U.S. cities, giving millions of Americans a chance to see an interplanetary spacecraft as it zips around the solar system.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The asteroid Eros is a 20-mile-long world with boulders the size of mansions, rocks layered like plywood and mysterious bright splotches on a terrain of mostly dull, moon-like grays and tans. And there are early signs that Eros may have once been part of a "lost planet." Pictures of Eros, snapped by the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous spacecraft during the first three days of orbital visit, have raised stacks of questions for scientists, who say that's just the way they like it. "Work is just starting, but it's already clear that Eros is much more exciting and geologically diverse than we had expected," said Andrew Cheng, NEAR project scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
WASHINGTON - When NASA's NEAR spacecraft ends its five-year mission on Feb. 12 by dropping onto the surface of the asteroid Eros, it will land at about the same speed as a World War II paratrooper, mission managers said yesterday. "We were just debating whether a linebacker for the Baltimore Ravens could catch this coming down," said Edward Weiler, associate NASA administrator for space science. But the verdict was "no." Although NEAR will land at just 7 mph, and weigh barely a pound once it's on the surface of the tiny asteroid, the spacecraft will still have a moving mass of 1,100 pounds as it comes in - enough energy to knock down even the toughest Raven.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
After orbiting the asteroid Eros for nearly a year, the Maryland-built NEAR spacecraft was to fire its thrusters today to begin a final series of low-altitude photographic passes over the bleak space rock, before ditching itself on the surface next month. If all goes well, NEAR will make five or six fly-bys over four days, the lowest, on Sunday, less than 9,000 feet above the surface. Scientists hope to get back detailed pictures that will answer their questions about poorly understood forces that seem to be eroding Eros' surface features.
NEWS
December 14, 2000
In Washington EEOC: Contraceptives belong in health plans like other preventives It's against federal law for employers to exclude contraceptives from their health insurance plans when they cover other preventive treatments, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said yesterday. The decision directly affects only two women who complained to the commission, but it has implications for millions of others whose health insurance plans exclude birth control pills, diaphragms and other forms of prescription contraceptives.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2000
Scientists say the asteroid 433 Eros, now being orbited by a Maryland-built spacecraft, is not a loose pile of space rubble, but a solid, if fractured, piece of rock. And that bit of information might come in handy some day. "If we ever have to deflect an asteroid that's coming toward our Earth, we really need to know that, if we push it in the wrong way, it might split into two asteroids, both of which are still heading towards Earth," said Andrew F. Cheng, project scientist for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous mission.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
The Maryland-built NEAR spacecraft is circling the asteroid Eros at an altitude of as little as 12 miles - its closest approach since arriving at the ancient space rock in February. "This is the payoff time," said NEAR project scientist Andrew Cheng of the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab in Laurel. Thousands of photos sent back by NEAR have revealed the 21-mile-long asteroid to be a bleak and battered place, cratered by meteorites and strewn with jagged boulders the size of buildings.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The asteroid Eros is a 20-mile-long world with boulders the size of mansions, rocks layered like plywood and mysterious bright splotches on a terrain of mostly dull, moon-like grays and tans. And there are early signs that Eros may have once been part of a "lost planet." Pictures of Eros, snapped by the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous spacecraft during the first three days of orbital visit, have raised stacks of questions for scientists, who say that's just the way they like it. "Work is just starting, but it's already clear that Eros is much more exciting and geologically diverse than we had expected," said Andrew Cheng, NEAR project scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2000
Scientists say the asteroid 433 Eros, now being orbited by a Maryland-built spacecraft, is not a loose pile of space rubble, but a solid, if fractured, piece of rock. And that bit of information might come in handy some day. "If we ever have to deflect an asteroid that's coming toward our Earth, we really need to know that, if we push it in the wrong way, it might split into two asteroids, both of which are still heading towards Earth," said Andrew F. Cheng, project scientist for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous mission.
NEWS
By DIANE SCHARPER | February 14, 1992
"What then might Love be?'' Socrates asked Diotima, the wise woman.''Is it a mortal?'' No, she told him, Love is most assuredly not a mortal. Neither is it an immortal, she said. It is something in between. ''What is it then?'' he asked.Love, Cupid, Amor, Eros: Love has many names. Love is the subject of myths, fairy tales, stories and poems. Love is the focus of studies -- literary, scientific, philosophical, social. Love plays the vital part in our lives. Love makes the world go round. But what is this thing called love?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
In a Valentine's Day marriage of science and sentiment, a Maryland-built spacecraft slipped into orbit yesterday around an asteroid named for the Greek god of love. After a 57-second thruster firing at 10: 33 a.m., the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous spacecraft slowed its speed to that of a lover's stroll and slipped into a 280-mile-high orbit around the asteroid Eros, where it immediately began taking pictures. It is the first man-made object ever to orbit an asteroid, and its arrival at Eros on Valentine's Day was a calculated melding of science and public relations.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1999
With the failures of two costly Mars spacecraft still painfully fresh, NASA is gearing up to tackle two more chancy missions. And this time the glare of public scrutiny will shift from NASA's Mars teams in California to Maryland.At the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, scientists are waiting out more delays in a space shuttle mission to replace failed gyroscopes that have idled the Hubble orbiting observatory. "I think we're aware we need to do well. NASA needs a winner," said the institute's director, Steven V. W. Beckwith.
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