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Ernie Pyle

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By ROGER SIMON | September 10, 1995
I could not help but think when watching President Clinton the other day at the Punchbowl, the vast military cemetery in Hawaii, of a man who was not there.The last time I was there, I looked for him. I saw instead only a broken red flower.And, in my mind's eye, an aging vet standing above the grave for a silent moment and dropping the flower with an embarrassed shrug.People do not flock to the Punchbowl, called that because it is a scooped-out and extinct volcano.But the tourists do come, and some people do remember.
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FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
Six days after the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a still grieving nation learned that beloved war correspondent Ernie Pyle had been killed early on the morning of April 18, 1945. Sixty years after his death, Pyle is still recalled as one of the great chroniclers of World War II. His stories from the front lines conveyed what war was really like, presenting it through the eyes and emotions of GIs for whom all its grimness and horror was a daily reality. "As a practitioner of the craft of journalism, Pyle was perhaps without peer.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | August 26, 1991
Fort Meade has closed one of two child development centers on base because it did not meet Defense Department requirements, but officialssay the disruption will not leave additional children without care.A base spokesman said there are still 500 children on a waiting list for child care -- the same number as before the facility closed --but some will be housed in a temporary facility that could be in place by next year.The old building, at 13th and Chamberlin streets, had been used as a child-care center for 25 years.
NEWS
By Edward Colimore and Edward Colimore,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 15, 2001
KEARNY, N.J. - The initials P.W.A. The same three kept turning up at the end of newspaper articles published 140 years ago and piqued the interest of New Jersey historian William Styple as he was researching a book last summer. Styple was looking through papers from the Civil War for letters written by common soldiers but was drawn instead to a mystery reporter who had written so eloquently of battles and leaders. He studied the papers for clues to P.W.A.'s identity and soon became acquainted with a fascinating man who may be viewed by history as the Ernie Pyle of the South: Peter Wellington Alexander.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1999
A construction worker digging at a new building site at Fort Meade ruptured a 6-inch gas line and set fire to a construction vehicle yesterday, post officials said.With flames 15 feet high, the blaze continued for more than four hours from the line that runs along Mapes Road between Chisolm Avenue and Ernie Pyle Street, according to a post spokesman.Although no one was injured in the accident, the fire caused $185,000 in damage to the machine the worker was operating, which the company, CER Contract Co. of Baltimore, called a street cutter.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
Six days after the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a still grieving nation learned that beloved war correspondent Ernie Pyle had been killed early on the morning of April 18, 1945. Sixty years after his death, Pyle is still recalled as one of the great chroniclers of World War II. His stories from the front lines conveyed what war was really like, presenting it through the eyes and emotions of GIs for whom all its grimness and horror was a daily reality. "As a practitioner of the craft of journalism, Pyle was perhaps without peer.
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | January 4, 1991
Washington--HOW MANY situps could Ernie Pyle do? Could Hal Boyle run two miles in 18 minutes, or in any time at all?Would Mark Watson, Larry Allen, Ira Wolfert, Homer Bigart, Keyes Beech, Maggie Higgins, Pat Morin, Don Whitehead, Mal Browne, Dave Halberstam, Pete Arnett or Bill Tuohy have dropped to the deck and done 40 quick pushups at the request of an Army public-relations officer?Almost 50 years ago, Ernie Pyle and Hal Boyle were two of the best-known Americans anywhere when they covered GIs fighting World War II. They and the others won the Pulitzer Prize for reporting this country's last three wars.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2000
Charles Read Madary Sr., a decorated Army officer who briefed war correspondents on some of history's momentous events, working side by side with Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ernie Pyle and Ernest Hemingway, died Wednesday of a heart attack at his Eastern Shore farm. He was 91. As a press officer for Eisenhower's European command during World War II, Mr. Madary was a liaison between the military and the press for historic moments such as D-Day, the liberation of the concentration camp at Bergen-Belsen, the German surrender at Rheims and the Nuremberg war crimes trial.
NEWS
By Edward Colimore and Edward Colimore,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 15, 2001
KEARNY, N.J. - The initials P.W.A. The same three kept turning up at the end of newspaper articles published 140 years ago and piqued the interest of New Jersey historian William Styple as he was researching a book last summer. Styple was looking through papers from the Civil War for letters written by common soldiers but was drawn instead to a mystery reporter who had written so eloquently of battles and leaders. He studied the papers for clues to P.W.A.'s identity and soon became acquainted with a fascinating man who may be viewed by history as the Ernie Pyle of the South: Peter Wellington Alexander.
FEATURES
April 18, 1996
Today in history: April 18In 1775, Paul Revere began his famous ride from Charlestown to Lexington, Mass., warning American colonists that the British were coming.In 1906, a devastating earthquake struck San Francisco, followed by raging fires.In 1945, famed American war correspondent Ernie Pyle, 44, was killed by Japanese gunfire on a Pacific island off Okinawa.In 1956, actress Grace Kelly married Prince Rainier of Monaco in a civil ceremony.In 1983, 62 people, including 17 Americans, were killed at the U.S. Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, by a suicide bomber.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2000
Charles Read Madary Sr., a decorated Army officer who briefed war correspondents on some of history's momentous events, working side by side with Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ernie Pyle and Ernest Hemingway, died Wednesday of a heart attack at his Eastern Shore farm. He was 91. As a press officer for Eisenhower's European command during World War II, Mr. Madary was a liaison between the military and the press for historic moments such as D-Day, the liberation of the concentration camp at Bergen-Belsen, the German surrender at Rheims and the Nuremberg war crimes trial.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1999
A construction worker digging at a new building site at Fort Meade ruptured a 6-inch gas line and set fire to a construction vehicle yesterday, post officials said.With flames 15 feet high, the blaze continued for more than four hours from the line that runs along Mapes Road between Chisolm Avenue and Ernie Pyle Street, according to a post spokesman.Although no one was injured in the accident, the fire caused $185,000 in damage to the machine the worker was operating, which the company, CER Contract Co. of Baltimore, called a street cutter.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 10, 1995
I could not help but think when watching President Clinton the other day at the Punchbowl, the vast military cemetery in Hawaii, of a man who was not there.The last time I was there, I looked for him. I saw instead only a broken red flower.And, in my mind's eye, an aging vet standing above the grave for a silent moment and dropping the flower with an embarrassed shrug.People do not flock to the Punchbowl, called that because it is a scooped-out and extinct volcano.But the tourists do come, and some people do remember.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | August 26, 1991
Fort Meade has closed one of two child development centers on base because it did not meet Defense Department requirements, but officialssay the disruption will not leave additional children without care.A base spokesman said there are still 500 children on a waiting list for child care -- the same number as before the facility closed --but some will be housed in a temporary facility that could be in place by next year.The old building, at 13th and Chamberlin streets, had been used as a child-care center for 25 years.
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | January 4, 1991
Washington--HOW MANY situps could Ernie Pyle do? Could Hal Boyle run two miles in 18 minutes, or in any time at all?Would Mark Watson, Larry Allen, Ira Wolfert, Homer Bigart, Keyes Beech, Maggie Higgins, Pat Morin, Don Whitehead, Mal Browne, Dave Halberstam, Pete Arnett or Bill Tuohy have dropped to the deck and done 40 quick pushups at the request of an Army public-relations officer?Almost 50 years ago, Ernie Pyle and Hal Boyle were two of the best-known Americans anywhere when they covered GIs fighting World War II. They and the others won the Pulitzer Prize for reporting this country's last three wars.
FEATURES
January 22, 1998
Don DeLillo, author of the epic-length novel "Underworld," will have a second chance to compete against "Cold Mountain" author Charles Frazier, who snatched the National Book Award out from under him.Both are now nominated in the fiction category for the National Book Critics Circle Award, along with Philip Roth ("American Pastoral") and two non-U.S. writers, Andrei Makine ("Dreams of My Russian Summers") and Penelope Fitzgerald ("The Blue Flower").The general nonfiction nominees were Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest Disaster," James L. Kugel's "The Bible As It Was," Anne Fadiman's "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down," Steven Pinker's "How the Mind Works" and Pauline Maier's "American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence."
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | May 14, 1995
50 Years Ago* State officials announced that microfilm copies of Maryland historic records that were shipped to Western Maryland in 1942-43 for safekeeping in case of possible bombing attacks are being returned to Annapolis. -- The Sun, June 2, 1945.* Yesterday, the Navy Department broke a silence to report that the submarine Barb, commanded by Commander Eugene Bennett Fluckey, of Annapolis, holder of the Congressional Medal of Honor, was responsible on three separate patrols for sinking so many Japanese ships that even the Navy Department cannot total the enemy losses.
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