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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2002
"Only truth can give true reputation; only reality can be of real profit. Unfounded things never reach old age." - Balthasar Gracian, 17th-century Spanish Jesuit We speak in baseball of immortality, of Ruthian clouts, of Mays' catches - even, if gruesomely now, of the mastery of Ted Williams, the Fenway deity whose corpse lies frozen in a cryonics lab, there to "live," perhaps, for a creepy eternity. Mostly, though, we speak of deeds, of acts that will live forever in the collective memory of the game.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | September 20, 2008
Jersey drenched, rain dripping off the bill of his cap, Hoyt Wilhelm kicked nervously at the mound. "Jeez," the Orioles pitcher muttered, weighing the gravity of the moment. "Oh, jeez." Wilhelm peered through the slop for the sign. As if it mattered. More than 18,000 fans at Memorial Stadium on Sept. 20, 1958, knew the knuckleball was coming. For 8 2/3 innings on a dreary Saturday afternoon in Baltimore, Wilhelm's butterfly pitch had fooled New York's American League champions. Now one batter, the Yankees' ornery Hank Bauer, stood between the Orioles and history.
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SPORTS
May 11, 2002
On deck The White Sox will be home for 22 of their next 28 games when they return to Chicago. He said it "I just look on it as I'm still doing the job, and I hope it doesn't distract from anything." Ernie Harwell, Tigers announcer, on the attention he's likely to receive as he completes his 55th and final season behind the microphone
SPORTS
September 30, 2002
Who's hot Juan Pierre of the Rockies led the majors with 47 stolen bases, and hit .422 (38-for-90) in September. Who's not The Blue Jays attracted 1,637,900 fans this season - their lowest attendance since 1982. Line of the dayChad Moeller, D'backs C AB R H RBI HR 4 3 4 6 2 He said it "Rather than goodbye, please allow me to say thank you. Thank you for letting me be a part of your family." Ernie Harwell, concluding his final broadcast after 55 seasons, 42 with the Tigers It's a fact Four teams (Tigers, Devil Rays, Brewers and Royals)
NEWS
June 24, 1991
THE MOST prominent person in the Detroit entourage next week as the Tigers arrive at Memorial Stadium will be no team member; rather, it's their famed broadcaster, Ernie Harwell. The front office has notified Harwell this is his final season. He is 73 years old; they want somebody younger. The ensuing rowdydow is a dandy.If fault could be found with Harwell's on-air performance, if he were fumbling player names or mangling sentences, then a pleasant retirement would be quick and proper. But Ernie's delivery, by all accounts, remains as smooth, balanced and knowledgeable as ever.
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | October 10, 1991
To the many goodbyes said Sunday at Memorial Stadium, add one: Baltimore Orioles radio announcer Ken Levine.Levine has resigned to be closer to his family and television writing work in California, Jeff Beauchamp, vice president and station manager of WBAL Radio, the Orioles' flagship, said last night.Levine, whose writing credits include "M*A*S*H" and "Cheers," just finished his rookie season as a major-league sportscaster. He was hired to replace Joe Angel, who left for the New York Yankees after 1990.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 30, 1991
DETROIT -- With seven games remaining, Jose Mesa is finished as a Baltimore Orioles starter for the 1991 season.Mesa went out with a flourish yesterday, surviving a shaky first inning to record his second win in the past 16 starts.Manager John Oates has selected Mike Mussina (on an extra day's rest), Dave Johnson and Bob Milacki to open the final three Memorial Stadium games against the Detroit Tigers next weekend."I'm going to get Jeff [Ballard] a start in New York, and the only way Mesa will pitch again is out of the bullpen in the last series," said Oates.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman | October 4, 1991
Lately, it is the No. 1 question asked of Baltimore Orioles employees, surpassing even, "Could you fix me up with a couple of tickets for Sunday?"It goes like this:"After the last out of the last game, then what?"People call the team's offices every day to ask this question. And every day the answer is the same. The Orioles are not talking. In most cases, they are not even hinting."It's going to be much more exciting for the fans if they don't know what's coming. What we have planned wouldn't have nearly the same impact if it were all scheduled out," said Rick Vaughn, Orioles public relations director and one of the chief architects of the final-weekend festivities.
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By MILTON KENT | October 7, 1997
For thousands of Baltimoreans who revered the great Orioles teams of the 1960s and 1970s, the names of Chuck Thompson and Bill O'Donnell are as indelibly etched in memory as Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Jim Palmer, Boog Powell or Davey Johnson.O'Donnell and Thompson were the radio and television voices of the team in those halcyon days, and, as most good announcers are, were trusted in many homes like a member of the family.Thompson was presented the Ford C. Frick Award by the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1993 and is leading a charge to get his partner of 16 years the same designation by championing his cause among the other seven members of the broadcasting committee.
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By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Evening Sun Staff | September 30, 1991
DETROIT -- In an emotional farewell, Ernie Harwell and his broadcast partner for the last 19 years, Paul Carey said goodbye to baseball fans here yesterday.Tonight's game will be the last from Tiger Stadium for baseball's longest running radio combo. In special pre-game ceremonies the two were cited by WJR, the station that provoked a listener revolt by announcing last winter it was pulling the plug on Harwell.Al Kaline, who left the Baltimore sandlots to carve a Hall of Fame career with the Tigers and now works as a TV analyst, gave a moving and eloquent testimonial to the retiring announcers.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2002
"Only truth can give true reputation; only reality can be of real profit. Unfounded things never reach old age." - Balthasar Gracian, 17th-century Spanish Jesuit We speak in baseball of immortality, of Ruthian clouts, of Mays' catches - even, if gruesomely now, of the mastery of Ted Williams, the Fenway deity whose corpse lies frozen in a cryonics lab, there to "live," perhaps, for a creepy eternity. Mostly, though, we speak of deeds, of acts that will live forever in the collective memory of the game.
SPORTS
By Mike Penner and Mike Penner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 2002
Late Orioles game: Late night's game between the Orioles and Twins in Minneapolis, which went into extra innings, ended too late to be included in this edition. A complete report can be found in later editions or on the Internet at http://www.sunspot.net. ANAHEIM, Calif. - Ernie Harwell did not know Chick Hearn. Never met him, never heard him. And, being Ernie Harwell, he almost apologizes for that shortcoming. "Of course I knew of his great reputation and the hold that he had on this region here," Harwell said Monday evening at Edison Field before pulling on the headset for the Detroit Tigers' latest defeat against the Anaheim Angels.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | July 18, 1999
Quality of voice, a profound knowledge of baseball -- worthy of Phi Beta Kappa recognition -- and the ability to transmit the subject matter with an attention-getting professional presence have carved a distinctive identity for Ernie Harwell. He has been an artist with words, painting vivid pictures; a moving montage, so to speak, from parks and stadiums across the landscape of America.It has been more than 50 years and still he goes on, uninterrupted, defying the aging process and creating a longevity that has informed and entertained generations of listeners.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | October 7, 1997
For thousands of Baltimoreans who revered the great Orioles teams of the 1960s and 1970s, the names of Chuck Thompson and Bill O'Donnell are as indelibly etched in memory as Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Jim Palmer, Boog Powell or Davey Johnson.O'Donnell and Thompson were the radio and television voices of the team in those halcyon days, and, as most good announcers are, were trusted in many homes like a member of the family.Thompson was presented the Ford C. Frick Award by the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1993 and is leading a charge to get his partner of 16 years the same designation by championing his cause among the other seven members of the broadcasting committee.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | January 17, 1992
Marv Albert has done a few NHL All-Star Games -- tomorrow (1 p.m.) will be his third for NBC, then there's TV syndication and radio. And, quite frankly, he thinks it's time for a change, which, of course, is not in the league's vocabulary."
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | October 10, 1991
To the many goodbyes said Sunday at Memorial Stadium, add one: Baltimore Orioles radio announcer Ken Levine.Levine has resigned to be closer to his family and television writing work in California, Jeff Beauchamp, vice president and station manager of WBAL Radio, the Orioles' flagship, said last night.Levine, whose writing credits include "M*A*S*H" and "Cheers," just finished his rookie season as a major-league sportscaster. He was hired to replace Joe Angel, who left for the New York Yankees after 1990.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | July 2, 1991
Last winter, rumors began circulating in broadcasting circles that Ernie Harwell would soon be dismissed by the Detroit Tigers and their flagship radio station, WJR."WBAL hadn't hired anybody yet for the Orioles," said Orioles broadcaster Jon Miller, "and it was my suggestion that we call up Ernie and hire him."The rumor proved premature -- Harwell was given one more year -- and Ken Levine received the Oriole job.But now Harwell, enshrined in the Hall of Fame in 1981, is on his farewell tour with the Tigers, the victim of a corporate decision that mandated change.
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