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NEWS
May 3, 1993
Ordinarily when 98 percent of eligible voters turn out for a referendum and 99.8 percent of them vote yes, the election was rigged. Not in last week's referendum in Eritrea. The question was whether 3.5 million Eritreans wanted independence from Ethiopia. Since they have fought in a bloody revolt for 30 years, the outcome was never in doubt. Equally remarkable, the new government in Ethiopia quietly accepts the decision.Yet independence simply marks the end of one struggle and the beginning of another.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | October 31, 2009
At first, the police only beat her. They had come to the two-room stone house where Abeba Hagos Enday lived with her four children to conscript her husband into the Eritrean army. When she told them - truthfully, she says - that she didn't know where he was, they gave her an ultimatum: Find him before we come back, or we will kill you. "I had to leave," Enday says through an interpreter. Enday, 39, is one of about four dozen Eritreans who have arrived in Baltimore since July, the first members of a group that resettlement officials expect to rival the current big three - Iraqis, Bhutanese and Burmese - in admissions during the next year.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is considering designating Eritrea as a state sponsor of terrorism, accusing it of running arms to Islamic insurgents in Somalia, the State Department's top official for Africa said yesterday. American officials say Eritrea, on the Red Sea, has been trying to destabilize the fragile government in the Somali capital, Mogadishu. That government came to power after Ethiopian troops, backed by the U.S., invaded Somalia and toppled an administration run by radical Islamic militias.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 11, 2007
ASMARA, Eritrea -- A rhythmic clamor of pounding hammers, buzzing grinders and clanging metal reverberates from the stone gateway of Eritrea's oldest open-air market. At first glance, the dusty bazaar behind downtown Asmara appears to be little more than a junkyard of rusted car parts, broken appliances and scraps of steel. But this isn't where old metal comes to die. It comes here to be reborn. Used artillery shells are recast as combs for beauty salons. Empty vegetable-oil tins morph into coffee pots.
NEWS
By RUSSELL WARREN HOWE | June 9, 1991
Washington. -- Pennsylvania-sized Eritrea, which calls itself Africa's last colony, is about to form a provisional government which will confirm its de facto independence from Ethiopia.Surprisingly little is known of the leadership of the victorious Eritrean People's Liberation Front. Its secretary general, Isaias Afwerki, who is expected to become either prime minister in a parliamentary system or executive president, is an elusive figure who has discouraged a personality cult.The front's literature mentions no other names and includes no pictures of any officials.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 2002
NAIROBI, Kenya - Ethiopia claimed victory yesterday in its border dispute with Eritrea after an independent tribunal at The Hague in the Netherlands handed down a ruling. But the ruling by the Permanent Court of Arbitration was not made public, and Eritrea branded Ethiopia's claims as lies. The two countries went to war in 1998 over the placement of the 620-mile border. The conflict, which went on for two years, left as many as 80,000 people dead. The five-member court delivered the ruling to the two governments yesterday morning, but officials agreed to delay public disclosure of the decision until tomorrow.
TOPIC
By Frank Smyth and Frank Smyth,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 2002
Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld this month became the highest-ranking American official to ever visit Africa's newest nation, the small state of Eritrea on the Red Sea across from Saudi Arabia and Yemen. At a time when Saudi Arabia is refusing to allow U.S. forces there for a possible invasion of Iraq, the United States is looking to expand its military presence across the Arabian Peninsula on the African Horn. "There are forces in the world that are urging, recommending, teaching fanaticism, extremism and terrorism, and those forces need to be overcome," Rumsfeld said in the Eritrean capital of Asmara in a joint news conference with the Eritrean leader, President Isaias Afwerki.
NEWS
December 10, 2000
PRESIDENT Abdelaziz Bouteflika of Algeria and Anthony Lake, former national security adviser to President Clinton, can take satisfaction. They jointly mediated a peace treaty ending the two-year disastrous war between Ethiopia and Eritrea. These two revolutionary East African regimes, allies against past tyranny in Ethiopia, can return to nation-building. Both showed promise before a border skirmish in 1998 turned into major conflict, leaving at least 50,000 dead and dispossessing one-third of Eritrea's 3 million people.
NEWS
June 3, 1991
The great capital of Addis Ababa is patrolled by soldiers who speak provincial Tigrinya and not the local tongue and Ethiopian national language, Amharic. That can lead to confusion and conflict. The Tigreans rebelled against the imperialism of the Amhara, whether under theocratic emperor or Marxist junta. Now the Amhara not unreasonably fear the shoe on the other foot.Ethiopian rulers had clout on the Red Sea coast until the 16th century, when the Turks invaded. At the end of the 19th century, Italy beat out Egypt and Ethiopia to set up the modern colony of Eritrea.
NEWS
By Semere Russom | April 27, 2000
IT HAS NOW been almost two years since Ethiopia's declaration of all-out war on Eritrea. Since then, Ethiopia has repeatedly attacked Eritrea all along the two states' common border, sending massive human waves of young Ethiopians to certain death. Now Ethiopia is faced with famine. For the past few years, the Ethiopian government bragged about "record harvests" to cover up the fact that the rains, and crops, had failed over large areas of the country. Ethiopia finally admitted this month that close to 10 million of its people are facing starvation.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is considering designating Eritrea as a state sponsor of terrorism, accusing it of running arms to Islamic insurgents in Somalia, the State Department's top official for Africa said yesterday. American officials say Eritrea, on the Red Sea, has been trying to destabilize the fragile government in the Somali capital, Mogadishu. That government came to power after Ethiopian troops, backed by the U.S., invaded Somalia and toppled an administration run by radical Islamic militias.
TOPIC
By Frank Smyth and Frank Smyth,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 2002
Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld this month became the highest-ranking American official to ever visit Africa's newest nation, the small state of Eritrea on the Red Sea across from Saudi Arabia and Yemen. At a time when Saudi Arabia is refusing to allow U.S. forces there for a possible invasion of Iraq, the United States is looking to expand its military presence across the Arabian Peninsula on the African Horn. "There are forces in the world that are urging, recommending, teaching fanaticism, extremism and terrorism, and those forces need to be overcome," Rumsfeld said in the Eritrean capital of Asmara in a joint news conference with the Eritrean leader, President Isaias Afwerki.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 2002
NAIROBI, Kenya - Ethiopia claimed victory yesterday in its border dispute with Eritrea after an independent tribunal at The Hague in the Netherlands handed down a ruling. But the ruling by the Permanent Court of Arbitration was not made public, and Eritrea branded Ethiopia's claims as lies. The two countries went to war in 1998 over the placement of the 620-mile border. The conflict, which went on for two years, left as many as 80,000 people dead. The five-member court delivered the ruling to the two governments yesterday morning, but officials agreed to delay public disclosure of the decision until tomorrow.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 22, 2001
ZALAMBESSA, Ethiopia - The bodies of dead soldiers still litter the sun-baked battlefields. Land mines claim the lives of children and farmers. And Ethiopians and Eritreans remain divided over everything from land to cows to their choice of soft drink. But for all the healing yet to be done along the Ethiopian-Eritrean border - a disputed 650-mile line that sparked a bitter two-year war - United Nations forces are optimistic that they can do something that has eluded them on the African continent: make peace and keep it. Seven months ago, 4,200 U.N. peacekeepers fanned out along the border to enforce the cease-fire that ended the war, which killed as many as 100,000 people.
NEWS
By Kurt Shillinger and Kurt Shillinger,BOSTON GLOBE | March 31, 2001
MASSAWA, Eritrea - Imagine a farm where water is never in short supply and each crop leaves the soil more fertile. Now imagine that farm offering a solution to the most vexing environmental issues of our times: global warming, declining water tables, loss of arable land, collapsing fisheries, and shrinking biodiversity. Finally, imagine that farm making money - real wealth, not just enough to pay the bills. After more than 30 years of research, Carl Hodges, an atmospheric physicist from the University of Arizona, no longer imagines such a farm.
NEWS
December 10, 2000
PRESIDENT Abdelaziz Bouteflika of Algeria and Anthony Lake, former national security adviser to President Clinton, can take satisfaction. They jointly mediated a peace treaty ending the two-year disastrous war between Ethiopia and Eritrea. These two revolutionary East African regimes, allies against past tyranny in Ethiopia, can return to nation-building. Both showed promise before a border skirmish in 1998 turned into major conflict, leaving at least 50,000 dead and dispossessing one-third of Eritrea's 3 million people.
NEWS
By S. M. Khalid | November 4, 1990
For most of the 200 people attending the two-day International Conference on Eritrea at the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore hotel this weekend, the mountainous territory that borders the Red Sea in East Africa is not an academic pursuit. It is home.Many of them are survivors of Africa's longest armed struggle, which began 28 years ago this month when the Ethiopian government of Emperor Haile Selassie ended a federation with the former Italian colony and forcibly annexed the culturally and historically distinct territory as its northern province.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1996
ATLANTA -- Rwanda. A 4-year-old girl, wearing a blue dress, races through the streets on a wooden leg.Eritrea. Kids look at a poster of their heroes, dead soldiers from a 30-year conflict. Cyclists race by, and the kids give joyous chase."What kind of heroes do you want for our kids?" said Johann Olav Koss, Norway's greatest speed skater, recounting the images that transformed him from an Olympic hero to a champion of children.Koss, Norway's Michael Jordan, won three gold medals at the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer.
NEWS
April 28, 2000
ALL POSSIBLE AID should be rushed to alleviate starvation in Ethiopia, where some 8 million lives, one-eighth of the population, are in peril. The United States and nongovernment agencies should not stint or place conditions. Most of the food needed has been pledged. Relatively little has been delivered. The famine that shows skeletons protruding through skin of people barely alive came inexorably, with advance notice. Three years of drought prepared it. Diversion of food reserves to neighboring countries exacerbated it. Economic reconstruction, for nonagricultural means with which to buy food, would take decades.
NEWS
By Semere Russom | April 27, 2000
IT HAS NOW been almost two years since Ethiopia's declaration of all-out war on Eritrea. Since then, Ethiopia has repeatedly attacked Eritrea all along the two states' common border, sending massive human waves of young Ethiopians to certain death. Now Ethiopia is faced with famine. For the past few years, the Ethiopian government bragged about "record harvests" to cover up the fact that the rains, and crops, had failed over large areas of the country. Ethiopia finally admitted this month that close to 10 million of its people are facing starvation.
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