Advertisement
HomeCollectionsErin Brockovich
IN THE NEWS

Erin Brockovich

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2002
While the country was watching Julia Roberts portray class action lawsuit heroine Erin Brockovich in a 2000 movie of the same name, the real Erin Brockovich was up to her nostrils in mold. Brockovich had moved into a million-dollar California home - 20 minutes from Malibu Beach - but couldn't understand why she couldn't shake a flu-like feeling. Finally, a doctor told her to undergo allergy tests. She was allergic to mold - the mold growing in, around and under her million-dollar toxic home.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 28, 2010
When President Bush pushed the Class Action Fairness Act (CAFA) through Congress in 2005, environmentalists lamented the demise of the one of the last robust incentives for energy companies to develop meaningful safeguards against environmental disasters. At the time the bill was passed, one headline presciently read, "Erin Brockovich, drop dead." BP executives should be relieved to find that her legacy is still buried six feet deep in oil sludge. In recent weeks, Congress and the president have been roundly criticized for their slow response to the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion in the Gulf that triggered one of the worst environmental disasters in U.S. history.
Advertisement
FEATURES
March 17, 2000
Let us now praise simple stories well told. "Erin Brockovich" is so disarmingly, deceivingly straightforward that it's almost jarring. Even more surprising, this unassuming movie comes from Steven Soderbergh, who has lent style and narrative complexity to such films as "Out of Sight" and "The Limey." Through the intrinsic power of his central character, brought to life by Julia Roberts, in her meatiest role and most accomplished performance yet, he has created the most unexpected movie of a career devoted to counter-intuitive turns: a mainstream Hollywood star vehicle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
Buzz" has become the byword for the combination of reviews, gossip and publicity that may win the attention of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. But the fun and significance of Oscar can go way deeper than buzz, into a magic quality we'll call "mojo" - a blend of filmmaking zest and originality, uncanny timing and tumultuous audience response that can drive "little movies that could" as well as big-studio blockbusters into moviegoers' bloodstreams. Slumdog Millionaire has mojo to the max. But so does a much smaller independent film named Frozen River, which has garnered a best actress nomination for Melissa Leo and a best original script nod for first-time writer-director Courtney Hunt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gina Kolata and Gina Kolata,new york times | April 16, 2000
It should be no surprise to viewers of the hit movie "Erin Brockovich" that the science portrayed in the movie is not really science. After all, this is a major motion picture coming out of Hollywood. It comes from a fairy-tale land where women are abnormally beautiful, men are lusciously handsome, where sex is unusually profligate and violence casual and frequent. So if audiences are willing to suspend disbelief in every other arena, why should anyone care about something so dull as the veracity of a film's scientific methodology?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 14, 2001
In Hollywood, 2000 was a good year to wield a sword. Or to be Steven Soderbergh. "Gladiator," starring Russell Crowe and a rebuilt Colosseum in an epic about Roman gladiators and the power of home, leads this year's Oscars pack with 12 nominations. "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," Taiwanese director Ang Lee's gravity-defying ode to the Chinese warrior tradition, was a close second with 10. But the biggest winner in the nominations announced yesterday may have been director Soderbergh, who not only saw two of his films nominated for best picture - "Erin Brockovich" and "Traffic" - but also will be competing against himself for best director.
NEWS
December 12, 2005
Robert Sheckley, 77, a writer of science fiction whose disarmingly playful stories pack a nihilistic subtext, died Friday from complications of a brain aneurysm in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. He wrote more than 15 novels and about 400 short stories; the actual total is uncertain since he was so prolific in his heyday, the 1950s and '60s, that magazine editors insisted he publish some stories under pseudonyms to avoid having his byline appear more than once in...
NEWS
September 29, 2008
Heather Locklear arrested on DUI charges MONTECITO, Calif.: Heather Locklear was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of a controlled substance in the upscale Santa Barbara area, authorities said yesterday. Locklear, 47, was pulled over by a California Highway Patrol officer Saturday afternoon after a resident reported seeing the actress leaving a parking lot and "driving erratically," patrol spokesman Tom Marshall said. She was believed to be alone in the car, he said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 24, 2001
One of network television's most maddening habits is taking a hit feature film, scrubbing out messages that might offend the powers that be, and then repackaging the neutered end-product as a weekly series - while denying a debt to the original. That's the story of "Kate Brasher," a new CBS drama starring Mary Stuart Masterson ("Fried Green Tomatoes") as a financially strapped single mom who finds new life as a passionate victims' advocate at a community center where she herself came as a victim seeking legal help.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 17, 2000
"Erin Brockovich," which opens today, represents yet another twist in a winding road recently taken by director Steven Soderbergh. In 1996, he released "Gray's Anatomy," a fanciful film adaptation of Spalding Gray's performance-memoir of his battle with a rare eye disease. The following year, Soderbergh came out with the adamantly quirky "Schizopolis," in which he played with notions of love, language and his own persona. Then came "Out of Sight," his adaptation of an Elmore Leonard thriller starring the high-voltage duo of George Clooney and Jennifer Lopez.
NEWS
September 29, 2008
Heather Locklear arrested on DUI charges MONTECITO, Calif.: Heather Locklear was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of a controlled substance in the upscale Santa Barbara area, authorities said yesterday. Locklear, 47, was pulled over by a California Highway Patrol officer Saturday afternoon after a resident reported seeing the actress leaving a parking lot and "driving erratically," patrol spokesman Tom Marshall said. She was believed to be alone in the car, he said.
NEWS
By Mark Caro and Mark Caro,Chicago Tribune | March 18, 2007
Few filmmakers have ever packed the commercial/critical one-two punch Steven Soderbergh exhibited in 2000. Erin Brockovich, his legal drama starring Julia Roberts, came out in the spring, grossed more than $125 million domestically and collected five Academy Award nominations, including best picture, director and actress (which Roberts won). His panoramic drug-trade drama Traffic was released at the end of the year, grossed $124 million and snagged another five Oscar nominations, with Soderbergh competing against himself for best picture and director.
NEWS
December 12, 2005
Robert Sheckley, 77, a writer of science fiction whose disarmingly playful stories pack a nihilistic subtext, died Friday from complications of a brain aneurysm in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. He wrote more than 15 novels and about 400 short stories; the actual total is uncertain since he was so prolific in his heyday, the 1950s and '60s, that magazine editors insisted he publish some stories under pseudonyms to avoid having his byline appear more than once in...
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | July 9, 2003
DISTINGUISHED epidemiologists Ed McMahon and Erin Brockovich have identified a new menace to America that the Department of Homeland Security has ignored, a fuzzy, slimy weapon of mass destruction that even now may be massing for attack on top of last week's eggplant parmesan. "Her crusade against pollution became a Hollywood blockbuster," Dan Rather intoned on CBS's 48 Hours last year. "But now Erin Brockovich is fighting a threat in her own home." It wasn't a dirty bomb, a terrorist cell or other attack.
FEATURES
November 25, 2002
With the cooperation of wife Nancy and children Patti, Ron and Michael, the documentary Ronald Reagan: A Legacy Remembered looks at personal aspects of the 40th president along with his public career. Others interviewed include top officials from the Reagan era, including James Baker, George Shultz and Casper Weinberger. The program airs tonight at 9 on the History Channel. At a glance Primetime: Special Edition (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJLA, Channel 7) -- In an episode called "Trapped," the news show takes on a Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook bent, examining how fast a building can fill with smoke and how to escape, how to get out of a submerged vehicledown and submerged and how to get out of a locked car trunk, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amanda Krotki and Amanda Krotki,Special to the Sun | March 17, 2002
After I graduated from an all-girls high school 10 years ago, my first thought was one of relief: I would never again be packed into a room filled with hundreds of women and not a man in sight. Then I attended the first night of the Unique Lives & Experiences lecture series at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall last month, and had to think again. I subscribed to the monthly series because I thought it would be interesting to hear what the five speakers -- Erin Brockovich, Lesley Stahl, Jehan Sadat, Maya Angelou and Barbara Bush -- had to say. It didn't occur to me that the fact that they are all women would have any bearing on the audience demographics.
NEWS
By Mark Caro and Mark Caro,Chicago Tribune | March 18, 2007
Few filmmakers have ever packed the commercial/critical one-two punch Steven Soderbergh exhibited in 2000. Erin Brockovich, his legal drama starring Julia Roberts, came out in the spring, grossed more than $125 million domestically and collected five Academy Award nominations, including best picture, director and actress (which Roberts won). His panoramic drug-trade drama Traffic was released at the end of the year, grossed $124 million and snagged another five Oscar nominations, with Soderbergh competing against himself for best picture and director.
NEWS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
Ever wonder where celebrities get their chic shades? More and more, the hip (and sometimes edgy) frame designs of Paris-based Frederic Beausoleil are showing up on the noses of Hollywood's elite. Here are some you might have seen: * Michael Douglas' professorial reading glasses in "Wonder Boys" (style No. 104 070) * Julia Roberts' cat-like shades in "Erin Brockovich" (style No. 26 293) * Sandra Bullock's sun-blocking hangover helpers in "28 Days" (style No. 171 300) Lucy Liu also wore them in "Charlie's Angels," Cameron Diaz in both "Any Given Sunday" and "Being John Malkovich," and Matt Damon in "Legend of Bagger Vance."
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2002
While the country was watching Julia Roberts portray class action lawsuit heroine Erin Brockovich in a 2000 movie of the same name, the real Erin Brockovich was up to her nostrils in mold. Brockovich had moved into a million-dollar California home - 20 minutes from Malibu Beach - but couldn't understand why she couldn't shake a flu-like feeling. Finally, a doctor told her to undergo allergy tests. She was allergic to mold - the mold growing in, around and under her million-dollar toxic home.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 24, 2001
One of network television's most maddening habits is taking a hit feature film, scrubbing out messages that might offend the powers that be, and then repackaging the neutered end-product as a weekly series - while denying a debt to the original. That's the story of "Kate Brasher," a new CBS drama starring Mary Stuart Masterson ("Fried Green Tomatoes") as a financially strapped single mom who finds new life as a passionate victims' advocate at a community center where she herself came as a victim seeking legal help.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.