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SPORTS
January 23, 1991
Gone bowlingErie County (N.Y.) Executive Dennis Gorski was scheduled to give his state of the county speech to the Erie County legislature tomorrow, but has postponed it until after the Super Bowl. The problem is, too many members will be in Tampa, Fla., to see the Buffalo Bills play the New York Giants.He said the trip came under the heading of county business because Erie County owns the Bills' home field, Rich Stadium."As county officials, the legislature and I are the landlords of Rich Stadium, and I think it's very appropriate for us to clear our schedules so we can be there," Gorski said.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
A 28-year-old woman who grew up in Reisterstown was killed in Erie, Pa., along with two of her children, authorities there said Monday. The killer was identified by police as the children's father, who also wounded his 2-year-old son before committing suicide. The Erie County coroner gave the shooter's name as Brian Dacus, 29. He had been in a relationship with the woman, Jamie Dianne Malanowski, for nine years, according to a posting on her Facebook page. She wrote that she had left him on Nov. 6, a week before she died.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 26, 1995
Three men were killed and a fourth was wounded early yesterday in a shootout on a tense Seneca Indian reservation in western New York where rival factions for the tribal leadership have clashed repeatedly in recent weeks, Seneca officials and Erie County authorities said."
NEWS
By Leslie Eaton and Leslie Eaton,New York Times News Service | April 16, 2000
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- If this city wanted a ruefully honest bumper sticker, it would read, "Buffalo: Love It and Leave It." The slogan sums up the conundrum that is Buffalo, a city that people say they love to live in and yet are leaving in droves. Once a bustling home to 1.1 million people, Erie County, which includes Buffalo and its suburbs, now has 926,000 and is shrinking fast. Last year alone, more than 10,000 people moved away, leading to one of the steepest population drops of any county in the nation, according to new federal census estimates.
NEWS
By Leslie Eaton and Leslie Eaton,New York Times News Service | April 16, 2000
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- If this city wanted a ruefully honest bumper sticker, it would read, "Buffalo: Love It and Leave It." The slogan sums up the conundrum that is Buffalo, a city that people say they love to live in and yet are leaving in droves. Once a bustling home to 1.1 million people, Erie County, which includes Buffalo and its suburbs, now has 926,000 and is shrinking fast. Last year alone, more than 10,000 people moved away, leading to one of the steepest population drops of any county in the nation, according to new federal census estimates.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
A 28-year-old woman who grew up in Reisterstown was killed in Erie, Pa., along with two of her children, authorities there said Monday. The killer was identified by police as the children's father, who also wounded his 2-year-old son before committing suicide. The Erie County coroner gave the shooter's name as Brian Dacus, 29. He had been in a relationship with the woman, Jamie Dianne Malanowski, for nine years, according to a posting on her Facebook page. She wrote that she had left him on Nov. 6, a week before she died.
SPORTS
June 9, 1991
In Buffalo, let there be lightJim Kelly's pass completion average, already pretty good, may get even better next season.The Erie County (N.Y.) legislature approved a $90,000 authorization to refurbish the lights at Rich Stadium, home of the Buffalo Bills. It's the first upgrade since the NFL club moved into the place in 1973.There had been complaints about poor lightilng from the Bills, taelevision people and fans."We were at the L.A. game (in October) taking light readings and one of the players came over and asked when we were going to turn on the rest of the lights," recalled county Public Works Commissioner John Loffred.
NEWS
By Andrew Maykuth and Andrew Maykuth,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 23, 1992
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- They call her Tia. She is 9 1/2 inches long, weighs 14 ounces and was named by the Operation Rescue leaders who use her to symbolize the human lives lost to abortion.But since police confiscated the fetus at an anti-abortion demonstration here Tuesday, Tia has come to symbolize the very question at the heart of the emotional abortion battle.Is Tia a baby or a fetus? A human being or fetal tissue?Or, on a practical basis for medical and legal officials, is Tia to be given a proper burial or disposed of as medical waste?
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | July 29, 1992
PRINCETON, N.J. -- Municipal bond issuers announced yesterday the early redemption of seven issues totaling more than $20.88 million.The issues being called are:* California Housing Finance Agency, Series 1987 A, revenue bonds maturing Aug. 1, 2016. Partial call of $8.7 million at par on Aug. 1, 1992.* Richmond Redevelopment Agency, Calif., Series 1982, revenue bonds maturing July 1, 2000. All outstanding bonds called at 103 on July 1, 1992.* Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Calif., Series 1987 U, revenue bonds maturing Aug. 15, 1997.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | May 5, 2005
NEW YORK - A doctor who treated the Buffalo, N.Y., firefighter who regained his long-lost ability to communicate credited a new mix of medicines, including stimulants, anti-depressants and Parkinson's disease drugs. Donald Herbert, 43, known to friends and family as "Donnie," emerged from nearly a decade of minimal consciousness Saturday, conversing with loved ones long into the night. Yesterday, the doctor at Erie County Medical Center who has treated the severely brain-damaged man for 2 1/2 years, said he had recently prescribed the medications but would not name them specifically.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 26, 1995
Three men were killed and a fourth was wounded early yesterday in a shootout on a tense Seneca Indian reservation in western New York where rival factions for the tribal leadership have clashed repeatedly in recent weeks, Seneca officials and Erie County authorities said."
SPORTS
June 9, 1991
In Buffalo, let there be lightJim Kelly's pass completion average, already pretty good, may get even better next season.The Erie County (N.Y.) legislature approved a $90,000 authorization to refurbish the lights at Rich Stadium, home of the Buffalo Bills. It's the first upgrade since the NFL club moved into the place in 1973.There had been complaints about poor lightilng from the Bills, taelevision people and fans."We were at the L.A. game (in October) taking light readings and one of the players came over and asked when we were going to turn on the rest of the lights," recalled county Public Works Commissioner John Loffred.
SPORTS
January 23, 1991
Gone bowlingErie County (N.Y.) Executive Dennis Gorski was scheduled to give his state of the county speech to the Erie County legislature tomorrow, but has postponed it until after the Super Bowl. The problem is, too many members will be in Tampa, Fla., to see the Buffalo Bills play the New York Giants.He said the trip came under the heading of county business because Erie County owns the Bills' home field, Rich Stadium."As county officials, the legislature and I are the landlords of Rich Stadium, and I think it's very appropriate for us to clear our schedules so we can be there," Gorski said.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
The United Way of Central Maryland said it would announce today that Larry E. Walton, head of the United Way in Richmond, will become its new president and chief professional officer Jan. 1.Mr. Walton, 49, who emerged from 137 applicants, has led Richmond's United Way since 1981. During his time there, annual campaign revenues grew from $6.1 million to $21 million, said Joseph E. Blair Jr., chairman of United Way of Central Maryland.The local United Way is in the midst of its annual campaign, which aims to raise $37 million.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | June 16, 1997
CHAUTAUQUA, N.Y. -- America's first-ever ''Chautauqua'' on regional governance was held June 1-4 where great discourse on society's future has flourished since the 1870s -- the Chautauqua Institution south of Buffalo in upstate New York.Delegates came from 15 states and Canada, including such citi-state areas as Chattanooga, Cleveland, Portland, Oregon, and Hamilton-Wentworth, Ontario. They brought success stories of reinvigorating inner cities, strengthening older suburbs, combating sprawl and pushing sustainable economic development.
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