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Erie Canal

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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 12, 2004
NEW YORK - New York state officials, citing procedural problems, have canceled a controversial contract that would have granted a politically connected developer the exclusive right to develop land along the historic Erie Canal for only $30,000. The lucrative arrangement, which was initially blessed by New York Gov. George E. Pataki's administration, was rescinded this week after months of criticism that developer Richard Hutchens had won the building rights with no competitive bidding.
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TRAVEL
October 18, 2009
I live in Nottingham and recently traveled to Ohio on a hunting trip. On a back road on my way home, I drove past a restored section of the Ohio and Erie canal. The leaves were changing colors ahead of the change in Maryland and I found what I thought was a perfect fall picture. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should have been taken within the past year and be accompanied by a description along with your name, address and phone number. Submissions cannot be returned and upon submission become the property of The Baltimore Sun. Readers who have their photos published will receive a travel book.
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NEWS
By Winnie Hu and By Winnie Hu,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 22, 2000
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. -- When the Erie Canal opened in 1825, it was a triumph of human invention, heralded from Buffalo to New York City. Cannons saluted passing boats. Fireworks and bonfires lighted the sky. And drinking, dancing and merrymaking overflowed its banks. But in this trading city along the Mohawk River, there were no cannon salutes or fireworks. Schenectady officials feared the canal would allow barges to float by their city and take away their prosperous riverfront business, so it was left to the students from Union College to fire off their muskets in welcome.
TRAVEL
November 19, 2006
GEOGRAPHY QUIZ-- The Erie Canal was constructed in the early 1800s to connect the Great Lakes with what river? (Answer below) QUIZ ANSWER (FROM ABOVE) Hudson River. SOURCE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC BEE
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 17, 1997
NORTH TONOWANDA, N.Y. - The federal government will provide $131 million to 57 communities along the Erie Canal and connecting waterways in the most sweeping economic development initiative in upstate New York in decades, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Andrew Cuomo announced last week.The HUD loans and grants, coupled with $102 million in private funds and $57 million from local governments, will be used to build shops, housing, marinas, restaurants, recreational trails and other tourist attractions along the state's 524-mile canal system in an effort to revive the economies of towns that once relied on manufacturing.
NEWS
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | November 24, 2002
ALBANY, N.Y. - A 4-foot-deep T-shaped cavity dug from weedy ground in the shadow of Interstate 787 overpasses here may reveal well-preserved stonework of what was once the nation's most important transportation artery. Two professors from Union College in Schenectady say that after two years of searching, they have found the 160-year-old eastern terminus of the Erie Canal in the vacant lot near the Hudson River in Albany. `Buried quite carefully' "Previous studies said that the canal was destroyed from Cohoes on down," said Denis Foley, a Union research professor in anthropology, who joined civil engineer and Assistant Professor Andrew Wolfe for the project.
NEWS
By Stephanie Earls and Stephanie Earls,ALBANY TIMES UNION | November 24, 2002
ALBANY, N.Y. - A 4-foot-deep, T-shaped cavity dug from weedy ground in the shadow of Interstate 787 overpasses here may reveal well-preserved stonework of what was once the nation's most important transportation artery. Two professors from Union College in Schenectady say that after two years of searching, they have found the 160-year-old eastern terminus of the Erie Canal in the vacant lot near the Hudson River in Albany. `Buried quite carefully' "Previous studies said that the canal was destroyed from Cohoes on down," said Denis Foley, a Union research professor in anthropology, who joined civil engineer and assistant professor Andrew Wolfe for the project.
TRAVEL
By Naedine Joy Hazell and Naedine Joy Hazell,Special to the Sun | July 28, 2002
Zipping along the New York Thruway, past cornfields and onion farms, anyone could be lulled by the tedious miles upon miles upon miles, the hum of small planes and Christian radio preachers, the windy nudges of tandem tractor-trailers. Who could be blamed, in such a state, for not noticing one of the wonders of the world, gliding quietly nearby, hidden by progress? This wonder, the Erie Canal, which transformed trade, transportation and the face of America 175 years ago, is largely forgotten today.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 12, 1998
I've got an old mule and her name is SalFifteen miles on the Erie CanalShe's a good old worker and a good old palFifteen miles on the Erie Canal1913, Thomas S. Allen, based on traditional American folk songLOCKPORT, N.Y. -- Two days before opening a brand-new visitor center for his struggling Erie Canal cruise business, Mike Murphy sits on his dock and looks out at the water, nervously.The permanently sunburned ex-policeman says he decided to put up the new building in this western New York city of 19,000 after visiting his daughter in Maryland, where he rode a water taxi from Fells Point to the foot of Harborplace.
TRAVEL
November 19, 2006
GEOGRAPHY QUIZ-- The Erie Canal was constructed in the early 1800s to connect the Great Lakes with what river? (Answer below) QUIZ ANSWER (FROM ABOVE) Hudson River. SOURCE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC BEE
NEWS
By CELIA PETERS and CELIA PETERS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2006
PUBLIC MONUMENTS ARE historical artifacts that literally become parts of our landscape. But to Karen Lemmey of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, a mid-19th-century monument bearing the likeness of an African-American man deserves closer examination. Lemmey will talk about the image and the monument it appears on in a lecture, The First African American on a Public Monument? H.K. Brown's "negro ... so truthfully rendered," at the National Gallery this month. Considering the distortion of African-American images in art during that time, the appearance of this African-American on the monument to American statesman DeWitt Clinton struck Lemmey's curiosity.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 12, 2004
NEW YORK - New York state officials, citing procedural problems, have canceled a controversial contract that would have granted a politically connected developer the exclusive right to develop land along the historic Erie Canal for only $30,000. The lucrative arrangement, which was initially blessed by New York Gov. George E. Pataki's administration, was rescinded this week after months of criticism that developer Richard Hutchens had won the building rights with no competitive bidding.
NEWS
By Stephanie Earls and Stephanie Earls,ALBANY TIMES UNION | November 24, 2002
ALBANY, N.Y. - A 4-foot-deep, T-shaped cavity dug from weedy ground in the shadow of Interstate 787 overpasses here may reveal well-preserved stonework of what was once the nation's most important transportation artery. Two professors from Union College in Schenectady say that after two years of searching, they have found the 160-year-old eastern terminus of the Erie Canal in the vacant lot near the Hudson River in Albany. `Buried quite carefully' "Previous studies said that the canal was destroyed from Cohoes on down," said Denis Foley, a Union research professor in anthropology, who joined civil engineer and assistant professor Andrew Wolfe for the project.
NEWS
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | November 24, 2002
ALBANY, N.Y. - A 4-foot-deep T-shaped cavity dug from weedy ground in the shadow of Interstate 787 overpasses here may reveal well-preserved stonework of what was once the nation's most important transportation artery. Two professors from Union College in Schenectady say that after two years of searching, they have found the 160-year-old eastern terminus of the Erie Canal in the vacant lot near the Hudson River in Albany. `Buried quite carefully' "Previous studies said that the canal was destroyed from Cohoes on down," said Denis Foley, a Union research professor in anthropology, who joined civil engineer and Assistant Professor Andrew Wolfe for the project.
NEWS
By Dan Barry and Dan Barry,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 2002
SYRACUSE, N.Y. - Something momentous is happening here, they say, something that will transform upstate New York like nothing since the glaciers, or at least the Erie Canal. It will do more than simply enrich the region, they say; it will change the very way that people think - about their environment, about themselves. It is not a new religion. It is a mall. But even "mall" does not do justice to this project, its promoters say, because it is so much more. It is DestiNY USA, a behemoth of a shopping, tourism and entertainment complex that will take up more square footage than two Empire State Buildings.
TRAVEL
By Naedine Joy Hazell and Naedine Joy Hazell,Special to the Sun | July 28, 2002
Zipping along the New York Thruway, past cornfields and onion farms, anyone could be lulled by the tedious miles upon miles upon miles, the hum of small planes and Christian radio preachers, the windy nudges of tandem tractor-trailers. Who could be blamed, in such a state, for not noticing one of the wonders of the world, gliding quietly nearby, hidden by progress? This wonder, the Erie Canal, which transformed trade, transportation and the face of America 175 years ago, is largely forgotten today.
TRAVEL
October 18, 2009
I live in Nottingham and recently traveled to Ohio on a hunting trip. On a back road on my way home, I drove past a restored section of the Ohio and Erie canal. The leaves were changing colors ahead of the change in Maryland and I found what I thought was a perfect fall picture. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should have been taken within the past year and be accompanied by a description along with your name, address and phone number. Submissions cannot be returned and upon submission become the property of The Baltimore Sun. Readers who have their photos published will receive a travel book.
NEWS
By CELIA PETERS and CELIA PETERS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2006
PUBLIC MONUMENTS ARE historical artifacts that literally become parts of our landscape. But to Karen Lemmey of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, a mid-19th-century monument bearing the likeness of an African-American man deserves closer examination. Lemmey will talk about the image and the monument it appears on in a lecture, The First African American on a Public Monument? H.K. Brown's "negro ... so truthfully rendered," at the National Gallery this month. Considering the distortion of African-American images in art during that time, the appearance of this African-American on the monument to American statesman DeWitt Clinton struck Lemmey's curiosity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2002
It was conceived out of worry that Baltimore would lose its commercial preeminence to the Erie Canal. It was born in the home of a Baltimore merchant prince. The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, which turned 175 years old yesterday, had a less-dramatic beginning than you might think. On Saturday, the B&O Railroad Museum will begin a 16th-month celebration of that humble founding and the railroad's long, storied history. And the public is invited to hop aboard and go along for the ride. (See box on this page and listing on Page 4.)
NEWS
By Winnie Hu and By Winnie Hu,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 22, 2000
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. -- When the Erie Canal opened in 1825, it was a triumph of human invention, heralded from Buffalo to New York City. Cannons saluted passing boats. Fireworks and bonfires lighted the sky. And drinking, dancing and merrymaking overflowed its banks. But in this trading city along the Mohawk River, there were no cannon salutes or fireworks. Schenectady officials feared the canal would allow barges to float by their city and take away their prosperous riverfront business, so it was left to the students from Union College to fire off their muskets in welcome.
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