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Erickson Retirement Communities

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FEATURES
October 18, 2007
Dr. Matt Narrett of Ellicott City has been named executive vice president and chief medical officer of Erickson Retirement Communities, a geriatric health care company based in Baltimore. Dr. Roy Thomas Smoot Jr. has joined Maryland General Hospital as chief medical officer. Smoot is a fellow in the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Carol Greider, professor and director of molecular biology and genetics in the Johns Hopkins Institute of Basic Biomedical Sciences, has been awarded the 2007 Horwitz Prize along with two other researchers.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
Dr. George G. Hansen, a retired dentist and master woodworker, died April 11 of pneumonia at Oak Crest Village retirement community. He was 89. The son of educators, Dr. Hansen was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. He spent his boyhood summers at a camp his parents owned and operated in Oakland, where he learned to ride horses, shoot, canoe, camp and do woodworking. After graduating in 1941 from Polytechnic Institute, where his father taught physical education, he earned his degree in an accelerated class in 1946 from the University of Maryland School of Dentistry.
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NEWS
October 7, 2006
Matthew R. Powell, a college student and accomplished guitarist, died of undetermined causes Tuesday at his Jarrettsville home. He was 20. "We are waiting the results of an autopsy, and the coroner suggested Matt may have died from an aneurysm or aspiration," said his father, Richard A. Powell, an executive with Erickson Retirement Communities. Mr. Powell was born in Silver Spring and raised in Jarrettsville. He was a 2004 graduate of North Harford High School, where he played varsity soccer.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2011
The founder of the Catonsville-based retirement community company that pioneered campus-style continuing-care facilities nationwide faces a $100 million lawsuit brought on by a trustee this month. John C. Erickson, who founded the Baltimore County Erickson Retirement Communities in 1983, is accused, along with his family members and other former board members, of approving company assets for private use. The company has since been bought by a local entrepreneur and operates under new leadership as Erickson Living.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
Maryland is the fifth-worst state to retire, at least according to a recent ranking that accounted for climate, crime, life expectancy, taxes and the cost of living. The only states worse than here are, in order: Nevada, Michigan, Alaska and South Carolina, according to MoneyRates.com, a financial site. Best places to spend your golden years? New Hampshire is No. 1, followed by Hawaii, South and North Dakota, Iowa, Virginia, Utah, Connecticut, Vermont and Idaho. But the retirement equation is often more complex than a ranking based on raw data.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2001
Erickson Retirement Communities, based in Catonsville, received the National Association of Home Builders' 2001 "Icons of the Industry Award" for its leadership in developing communities for senior citizens. The NAHB award was presented to Erickson on Friday at the Seniors Housing Symposium in Phoenix. Erickson was cited for its "exemplary development of service-enriched seniors housing," according to a company statement. Erickson manages three retirement campuses for moderate-income senior citizens in Maryland: Charlestown, Oak Crest Village and Riderwood Village.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2010
Erickson Retirement Communities, which emerged from bankruptcy last month, said Monday that its planned sale to a local investor has closed. Redwood Capital Investments, controlled by businessman Jim Davis, bought the Catonsville-based national chain of senior-living communities for $365 million. Davis — also the majority owner of Allegis Group, a staffing firm in Hanover — won the bidding for Erickson in a two-company auction overseen by the bankruptcy court. Erickson said in a statement that it will "focus on its core business and the communities it manages, including building out the developing communities as demand warrants and, as early as 2012, entering attractive new markets."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Just months after Erickson Retirement Communities filed for bankruptcy, the company's new owners say they are poised for expansion with the same business model that seized up along with the housing and credit markets last year. Local entrepreneur Jim Davis, whose Redwood Capital Investments LLC bought Erickson for $365 million this month, said the Catonsville-based company is more financially sound than ever after wiping out most of its debt through the bankruptcy. That will enable Erickson to move forward in the next year with new housing at about a dozen of its existing communities that are not fully developed, he said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 12, 2004
A nonprofit group is converting a former convent in Canton into housing for critically ill children from around the world who come to Baltimore for bone marrow transplants. A groundbreaking ceremony is slated for today at the Children's House at St. Casimir, at 2712 O'Donnell St. The Believe in Tomorrow National Children's Foundation is spearheading the $900,000 project, which will provide accommodations for pediatric patients and their families. The facility will include apartments, a rooftop deck and a "healing garden."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Erickson Living, a Catonsville-based developer and manager of retirement communities, laid off 30 corporate employees earlier this month as part of business restructuring that has been under way since the company emerged from bankruptcy under new ownership in the spring. A spokesman for the company, previously called Erickson Retirement Communities, said half of those employees worked in the Baltimore region and that all were given severance and outplacement help. The spokesman, Dan Dunne, said the company has hired more than 2,000 people since June at various levels, including 50 in the corporate offices.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Driven by a sizable baby boomer population nearing retirement age, Maryland, like the rest of the nation, grew older in the past decade, but Baltimore bucked the trend, attracting more young adults as the number of its middle-age and retiree residents shrank, according to new census figures. Marylanders' median age increased to 38, from 36 in 2000, according to the data, released Thursday by the Census Bureau. The country as a whole has aged in recent years: The median age in the United States was 37.2 in 2010, an increase of nearly two years compared to 2000 and the highest median age ever, according to the Census Bureau.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
As Maryland's efforts to implement electronic medical records escalate, so does the debate about patient privacy and the potential for commercial exploitation of the technology. Computerized files are seen as a way to improve care and save tens of billions of dollars in health costs, but doctors and advocacy groups have raised concerns about the risks of exposing detailed personal health information. In particular, doctors worry that insurance and drug companies could manipulate the records to affect decisions on patient treatment.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Erickson Living, a Catonsville-based developer and manager of retirement communities, laid off 30 corporate employees earlier this month as part of business restructuring that has been under way since the company emerged from bankruptcy under new ownership in the spring. A spokesman for the company, previously called Erickson Retirement Communities, said half of those employees worked in the Baltimore region and that all were given severance and outplacement help. The spokesman, Dan Dunne, said the company has hired more than 2,000 people since June at various levels, including 50 in the corporate offices.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
Maryland is the fifth-worst state to retire, at least according to a recent ranking that accounted for climate, crime, life expectancy, taxes and the cost of living. The only states worse than here are, in order: Nevada, Michigan, Alaska and South Carolina, according to MoneyRates.com, a financial site. Best places to spend your golden years? New Hampshire is No. 1, followed by Hawaii, South and North Dakota, Iowa, Virginia, Utah, Connecticut, Vermont and Idaho. But the retirement equation is often more complex than a ranking based on raw data.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Just months after Erickson Retirement Communities filed for bankruptcy, the company's new owners say they are poised for expansion with the same business model that seized up along with the housing and credit markets last year. Local entrepreneur Jim Davis, whose Redwood Capital Investments LLC bought Erickson for $365 million this month, said the Catonsville-based company is more financially sound than ever after wiping out most of its debt through the bankruptcy. That will enable Erickson to move forward in the next year with new housing at about a dozen of its existing communities that are not fully developed, he said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2010
Erickson Retirement Communities, which emerged from bankruptcy last month, said Monday that its planned sale to a local investor has closed. Redwood Capital Investments, controlled by businessman Jim Davis, bought the Catonsville-based national chain of senior-living communities for $365 million. Davis — also the majority owner of Allegis Group, a staffing firm in Hanover — won the bidding for Erickson in a two-company auction overseen by the bankruptcy court. Erickson said in a statement that it will "focus on its core business and the communities it manages, including building out the developing communities as demand warrants and, as early as 2012, entering attractive new markets."
BUSINESS
March 15, 2008
Acquisitions Phillips Edison & Co., a Baltimore-based owner and manager of community shopping centers, purchased the 83,438-square-foot Orchard Plaza in Altoona, Pa. Financial terms were not disclosed. Williams Scotsman acquired 330 mobile units from Fort Worth, Texas-based General Modular Corp. The newly acquired units will be added to the Baltimore firm's Dallas/Fort Worth branch operation. Awards Blind Industries and Services of Maryland received an Employment Retention/Growth/Upward Mobility Award from the National Industries for the Blind.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2010
Erickson Retirement Communities, the national chain of campus-style senior living facilities, emerged from bankruptcy Friday less than six months after filing the Chapter 11 case, attorneys said. Catonsville-based Erickson is being sold to Redwood Capital Investments LLC, a Baltimore-based investment firm, for $365 million. The sale — expected to close by the end of the month — and a post-bankruptcy reorganization plan have been approved by a federal bankruptcy court in Texas, attorneys for Erickson and affiliated debtors announced.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Jamie Smith Hopkins | February 25, 2010
John C. Erickson, founder of a national chain of retirement communities that began with a senior-living campus in Catonsville, plans to step down as chairman of his company after it emerges from bankruptcy this year. He and five top managers, including the chief executive and chief financial officer and Erickson's two sons, will be replaced by a team chosen by Redwood Capital Investments LLC, a Baltimore-based investment firm that is buying Erickson Retirement Communities. The new team will take over once the company emerges from Chapter 11 bankruptcy by late March or early April, an Erickson spokesman said Wednesday.
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