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NEWS
August 8, 2004
On Sunday August 1, 2004, HERBERT J. ERICKSON died at his residence in Red Bank. He resided in red Bank for 14 years, formerly residing in St. Michael's, Maryland. He was employed as a Marine Engineer for George Sharp of New York City, NY., as a propulsion design specialist, who helped design propulsion for the first nuclear powered submarine (USN Nautilus). He was an expert woodworker who carved decoys and made furniture. He was predeceased by his parents; Gustave and Hilma Erickson and his wife of 47 years; Jane Stenberg Erickson, in 1983, a brother Edwin Erickson.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Clarence M. "Erick" Erickson, a decorated Korean War Navy flier and retired defense worker, died May 25 of complications from dementia at Madonna Heritage, a Jarrettsville assisted-living facility. He was 94. The son of farmers, Clarence Merlin Erickson was born and raised in Rhame, N.D. After graduating from Rhame High School in 1936, Mr. Erickson joined the Civilian Conservation Corps. Mr. Erickson enlisted in the Navy in 1944 and graduated from ordnance school. He entered flight school, from which he graduated in 1947.
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SPORTS
By Joe Strauss | September 22, 1999
ARLINGTON, Texas -- Scott Erickson makes his 33rd start tonight with a chance to achieve 15 wins. Given his 1-8 start, Erickson has another equally impressive opportunity to lead the American League in innings pitched for the second consecutive season.With 215 1/3 innings, Erickson makes tonight's appearance trailing Jamie Moyer's 223 innings."He's been one of the big reasons we've come on so well since the break," said manager Ray Miller, referring to Erickson's 10-3 record in the second half, including three wins during the team's current winning streak.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
Dr. George G. Hansen, a retired dentist and master woodworker, died April 11 of pneumonia at Oak Crest Village retirement community. He was 89. The son of educators, Dr. Hansen was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. He spent his boyhood summers at a camp his parents owned and operated in Oakland, where he learned to ride horses, shoot, canoe, camp and do woodworking. After graduating in 1941 from Polytechnic Institute, where his father taught physical education, he earned his degree in an accelerated class in 1946 from the University of Maryland School of Dentistry.
SPORTS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | May 7, 1995
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Former University of Miami football coach Dennis Erickson used an eroding drug policy to withhold players' positive drug tests in the week before the 1995 Orange Bowl, according to current and former school drug-policy officials.Erickson moved into position to compromise drug testing two years ago after Paul Dee became athletic director and significant changes were made to a long-standing drug policy.Dee said he knew of one case in which he "wasn't notified" of positive drug-test results and that "Coach Erickson was responsible for sending the results to me."
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1995
CHICAGO -- The angry demeanor of Orioles manager Phil Regan after losses is becoming a trademark. Chucks his microphone, cuts off questions, snaps at stupid queries, etc.So it seemed strange that after Minnesota Twins right-hander Scott Erickson held the Orioles to three hits over eight innings Tuesday night, Regan was so gracious in his respect for Erickson. That guy has great stuff, Regan said. Pitched a great game. A sinking fastball about 88-92 mph. Not much you can do.Turns out that, that afternoon, Regan found out the Orioles had a good chance of dealing for Erickson -- a trade that came down yesterday, when the Twins swapped the 27-year-old pitcher for Orioles right-hander Scott Klingenbeck and a player to be named, either minor-leaguer Kimera Bartee or Damon Buford.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | October 9, 1997
The Orioles are in ideal position to win the American League Championship Series, and not just because Scott Erickson pitched them to a 3-0 victory in Game 1 last night.Erickson was utterly dominant, holding Cleveland to four singles in eight innings. And the best part is, he also could pitch Game 4 and even Game 7 on three days' rest if the Orioles decide to give Jimmy Key only one start in this series."It's a possibility, a probability," pitching coach Ray Miller said of Erickson's starting Game 4. "I think we'll wait and see where we're at. But that's what we plan to do."
SPORTS
By McClatchy News Service | January 12, 1995
SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Dennis Erickson, a 47-year-old native of Everett, Wash., who led the University of Miami to two national titles, fulfills a lifetime dream today when he will announce his decision to come home to coach the Seattle Seahawks.A news conference is set for 2:30 p.m. today in Palo Alto, Calif., where Erickson will coach the East team Saturday in the East-West Shrine college all-star game. The Associated Press also confirmed Erickson's hiring.Erickson replaces Tom Flores, who was fired Dec. 29 after six years with the Seahawks, the last three as head coach.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1995
CHICAGO -- The Orioles are close to trading for Minnesota Twins right-hander Scott Erickson, and a baseball source says the chances are very good the deal will be completed shortly.The two sides seem to have settled on the core of the trade: Erickson for Orioles rookie Scott Klingenbeck and a player to be named, although one source familiar with the negotiations say the two sides haven't yet delved into the identity of the second, unnamed player. The Orioles want to check Erickson's medical records before finalizing the deal.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1995
Scott Erickson's ability to induce ground balls is what made him so appealing to the Orioles. The thinking was getting him off the artificial turf in the Metrodome would transform the right-hander into a more consistent performer.That thinking has been sound thus far, as his 3.51 ERA and the Orioles' 3-1 record in games he has started attests. But Erickson also brings an added dimension to the mound -- the ability to get a needed strikeout. And that's what enabled him to survive six innings in the Orioles' 4-3 win over Texas on Tuesday.
EXPLORE
July 27, 2011
Rev. Michael Erickson and Ruth Erickson, of Fallston, announce the engagement of their daughter, Anna Elizabeth Erickson, to Kenneth John Tozzi Jr., of Bel Air. The bride-to-be is a 2007 graduate of Fallston High School and a 2011 graduate of James Madison University. She is employed as a registered nurse at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore. The groom-elect is son of Col. Kenneth Tozzi and Martha Tozzi, of Bel Air, a 2007 graduate of Fallston High School and a 2011 graduate of the University of Maryland at College Park.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2011
The founder of the Catonsville-based retirement community company that pioneered campus-style continuing-care facilities nationwide faces a $100 million lawsuit brought on by a trustee this month. John C. Erickson, who founded the Baltimore County Erickson Retirement Communities in 1983, is accused, along with his family members and other former board members, of approving company assets for private use. The company has since been bought by a local entrepreneur and operates under new leadership as Erickson Living.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Erickson Living, a Catonsville-based developer and manager of retirement communities, laid off 30 corporate employees earlier this month as part of business restructuring that has been under way since the company emerged from bankruptcy under new ownership in the spring. A spokesman for the company, previously called Erickson Retirement Communities, said half of those employees worked in the Baltimore region and that all were given severance and outplacement help. The spokesman, Dan Dunne, said the company has hired more than 2,000 people since June at various levels, including 50 in the corporate offices.
HEALTH
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 20, 2010
Elsa Lundgren beams as she stands in the archway between her bedroom and living room. She used to live in a single, hospital-like room on the assisted-living floor at Broadmead retirement community in Hunt Valley. But after a renovation, she now has a sitting room with a flat-screen TV, a small kitchen, a bathroom with a walk-in shower and, most important to her, several large windows that give her plenty of light. "My eyesight was getting poorer and poorer," says the 96-year-old, who has lived at Broadmead for 18 years.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Just months after Erickson Retirement Communities filed for bankruptcy, the company's new owners say they are poised for expansion with the same business model that seized up along with the housing and credit markets last year. Local entrepreneur Jim Davis, whose Redwood Capital Investments LLC bought Erickson for $365 million this month, said the Catonsville-based company is more financially sound than ever after wiping out most of its debt through the bankruptcy. That will enable Erickson to move forward in the next year with new housing at about a dozen of its existing communities that are not fully developed, he said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2010
Erickson Retirement Communities, which emerged from bankruptcy last month, said Monday that its planned sale to a local investor has closed. Redwood Capital Investments, controlled by businessman Jim Davis, bought the Catonsville-based national chain of senior-living communities for $365 million. Davis — also the majority owner of Allegis Group, a staffing firm in Hanover — won the bidding for Erickson in a two-company auction overseen by the bankruptcy court. Erickson said in a statement that it will "focus on its core business and the communities it manages, including building out the developing communities as demand warrants and, as early as 2012, entering attractive new markets."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2008
In a bid to improve treatment and reduce errors, Erickson Retirement Communities and three Baltimore-area hospital systems said yesterday that they plan to create a pioneering health information exchange that would give emergency room physicians quick access to patients' medication histories. As part of a governor's initiative, the Maryland Health Care Commission requested in January proposals to create such an exchange. The commission selected the joint venture of Erickson, which runs retirement communities locally in Catonsville and Parkville, and Johns Hopkins Medicine, MedStar Health and the University of Maryland Medical System and will provide $250,000 in startup funding through the Health Services Cost Review Commission.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | August 26, 1991
Scott Erickson is the Minnesota Twins' pitching ace, but he is no Superman, and after the Orioles had chased him into the clubhouse in the fifth inning, he seemed almost too human."
BUSINESS
April 16, 2010
Erickson Retirement Communities, the national chain of campus-style senior living facilities, emerged from bankruptcy Friday less than six months after filing the Chapter 11 case, attorneys said. Catonsville-based Erickson is being sold to Redwood Capital Investments LLC, a Baltimore-based investment firm, for $365 million. The sale — expected to close by the end of the month — and a post-bankruptcy reorganization plan have been approved by a federal bankruptcy court in Texas, attorneys for Erickson and affiliated debtors announced.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock Jay.Hancock @baltsun.com | March 5, 2010
A fter hanging in limbo for four months, former employees of Erickson Retirement Communities heard Wednesday that the company will move to pay $750,000 of the $1.8 million in severance they're owed. Ex-employees owed less than $10,950 in severance would get everything previously pledged by the company, which has been in Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings since October. Those owed more would get only $10,950, several dozen of the former workers were told in a conference call Wednesday afternoon.
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