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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 9, 1994
He's everywhere! It's raining Eric Stoltz! At least in "Mask" we couldn't see his face! But now, in "Killing Zoe" and "Pulp Fiction," and finally "Sleep With Me," the freckly redhead has become the poster boy of American independent film."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | June 1, 2003
The start of the summer television season tonight brings a major issue of today's TV into sharp focus: the way viewers are being divided between those who have premium cable and those who do not. Maybe television never really was free and public, given the way advertising has always determined network programming. But this is another degree of remove, with television offering one kind of programming for an elite audience and a lesser kind for the general public. One need look no further than the matchup tonight at 10 between the second season premiere of HBO's critically acclaimed The Wire and the debut of Showtime's Out of Order, a wise, take-no-prisoners drama about life inside a long-term marriage.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 11, 1997
Well, excuse me, but any film calling itself "Keys to Tulsa" ought to be shot in the great state of Oklahoma, not in the overexposed city of Dallas, Texas, by the crew leftover from "Walker, Texas Ranger."So that's one strike. Here's Strike Two: "Keys to Tulsa."A not-good melodrama that's poorly acted and difficult to follow, the movie is also too long and violent. But it does have one aspect worth noting: James Spader as Elvis.Not Elvis-Elvis, but an Elvis influencee, a dope dealer married to a disinherited rich girl who is currently blackmailing an oil-tycoon pervert for the murder of a black prostitute.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 20, 1997
If there is one season finale worth going out of your way to see in a week that's wall-to-wall with them, it's "The Birth" on tonight's "Mad About You."I stopped getting excited about television moms having babies about 20 years ago when it started to become a ratings ploy pattern for May "sweeps." So, I sat down to watch this episode armed and dangerously cynical.I walked away a believer -- believing Paul Reiser & Co. might just make this baby thing work. "The Birth" is funny, irreverent and sophisticated, with only one moment of over-the-top schmaltz near the end.It is not the funniest sitcom episode of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 26, 1994
The "naked" in "Naked of New York" is the nakedness of power. Here's a callow, unformed, infernally precious movie that has a cast far better than it deserves -- Kathleen Turner, Timothy Dalton, Eric Stoltz, Mary-Louise Parker, even, for crying out loud, William Styron. What is going on? Could it be . . . SATAN?Actually, no: it's the powerful producer-director Martin Scorsese, serving as executive producer to Dan Algrant's meek little autobiographical tale about a wannabe playwright struggling for attention in Manhattan.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 20, 1997
If there is one season finale worth going out of your way to see in a week that's wall-to-wall with them, it's "The Birth" on tonight's "Mad About You."I stopped getting excited about television moms having babies about 20 years ago when it started to become a ratings ploy pattern for May "sweeps." So, I sat down to watch this episode armed and dangerously cynical.I walked away a believer -- believing Paul Reiser & Co. might just make this baby thing work. "The Birth" is funny, irreverent and sophisticated, with only one moment of over-the-top schmaltz near the end.It is not the funniest sitcom episode of the year.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1996
"Kicking and Screaming" is kind of like a college roommate you've never met before. First, its wit attracts you. It's intellectual, but that makes for intelligent conversation. It likes a good beer now and then, so is pretty fun to hang with, but soon enough you realize it likes beer all the time. That's about all it likes. You start wishing it would pick up its laundry and get the heck outta the room and do something, for goodness sake.The metaphor is apt for "Kicking and Screaming," about a group of friends who have just graduated from college and spent a year slumming around, trying to figure out just where they're supposed to be. It's a sharp, heartfelt, funny movie and worth forgiving for going on a little too long.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 12, 1993
THE WATERDANCE(Columbia TriStar, 1992) This could have been another run-of-the-mill movie about a young man's difficult adjustment to being a paraplegic. And in some ways it is.But Joel (Eric Stoltz) is not looking for pity and doesn't feel sorry for himself often. A quiet young writer who was paralyzed in a hiking accident, he is now trying to adjust to his new lifestyle in a hospital rehabilitation ward. Complicating the process is his relationship with Anna, a married woman (Helen Hunt)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | June 1, 2003
The start of the summer television season tonight brings a major issue of today's TV into sharp focus: the way viewers are being divided between those who have premium cable and those who do not. Maybe television never really was free and public, given the way advertising has always determined network programming. But this is another degree of remove, with television offering one kind of programming for an elite audience and a lesser kind for the general public. One need look no further than the matchup tonight at 10 between the second season premiere of HBO's critically acclaimed The Wire and the debut of Showtime's Out of Order, a wise, take-no-prisoners drama about life inside a long-term marriage.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | October 11, 1990
*''Memphis Belle'' A World War II film in which a B-17 crew hopes so survive its 25th mission. Matthew Modine and Eric Stoltz are in the cast.*''Mr. Destiny''James Belushi is a young man who believes his life would be much better had he hit that baseball, years before, in the high school championship game. A stranger (Michael Caine) shows him how life would have been if he had.* 'Welcome Home, Roxy Carmichael'' Winona Ryder is Dinky Rosetti, a teen-ager who hopes to follow in the steps of the local girl who made good.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 11, 1997
Well, excuse me, but any film calling itself "Keys to Tulsa" ought to be shot in the great state of Oklahoma, not in the overexposed city of Dallas, Texas, by the crew leftover from "Walker, Texas Ranger."So that's one strike. Here's Strike Two: "Keys to Tulsa."A not-good melodrama that's poorly acted and difficult to follow, the movie is also too long and violent. But it does have one aspect worth noting: James Spader as Elvis.Not Elvis-Elvis, but an Elvis influencee, a dope dealer married to a disinherited rich girl who is currently blackmailing an oil-tycoon pervert for the murder of a black prostitute.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1996
"Kicking and Screaming" is kind of like a college roommate you've never met before. First, its wit attracts you. It's intellectual, but that makes for intelligent conversation. It likes a good beer now and then, so is pretty fun to hang with, but soon enough you realize it likes beer all the time. That's about all it likes. You start wishing it would pick up its laundry and get the heck outta the room and do something, for goodness sake.The metaphor is apt for "Kicking and Screaming," about a group of friends who have just graduated from college and spent a year slumming around, trying to figure out just where they're supposed to be. It's a sharp, heartfelt, funny movie and worth forgiving for going on a little too long.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 9, 1994
He's everywhere! It's raining Eric Stoltz! At least in "Mask" we couldn't see his face! But now, in "Killing Zoe" and "Pulp Fiction," and finally "Sleep With Me," the freckly redhead has become the poster boy of American independent film."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 26, 1994
The "naked" in "Naked of New York" is the nakedness of power. Here's a callow, unformed, infernally precious movie that has a cast far better than it deserves -- Kathleen Turner, Timothy Dalton, Eric Stoltz, Mary-Louise Parker, even, for crying out loud, William Styron. What is going on? Could it be . . . SATAN?Actually, no: it's the powerful producer-director Martin Scorsese, serving as executive producer to Dan Algrant's meek little autobiographical tale about a wannabe playwright struggling for attention in Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 12, 1993
THE WATERDANCE(Columbia TriStar, 1992) This could have been another run-of-the-mill movie about a young man's difficult adjustment to being a paraplegic. And in some ways it is.But Joel (Eric Stoltz) is not looking for pity and doesn't feel sorry for himself often. A quiet young writer who was paralyzed in a hiking accident, he is now trying to adjust to his new lifestyle in a hospital rehabilitation ward. Complicating the process is his relationship with Anna, a married woman (Helen Hunt)
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 26, 1996
Sitting across a table from Ralph Macchio, you have to keep reminding yourself that you're not talking to a kid. After all, he's 34 years old now with two kids of his own.But Ralph Macchio was a teen-ager much longer than most of us. After all, he was 27 by the time he made his third -- and he hopes last -- "Karate Kid" movie.And he still has that playful gleam in his eye, and, yes, that boyish grin.Not that Macchio tries to minimize his boyishness. To the contrary, it undoubtedly helped him win the lead in "How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying," which begins its national tour at the Mechanic Theatre on Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 21, 1997
Bugs have been terrorizing mankind for centuries -- Remember Moses and the locusts? -- but never more than in the five films the Sci-Fi Channel is airing during its "Big Bad Bugs" theme week.The many-legged fun kicks off tonight with "The Fly 2" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats 1 a.m.-3 a.m., Sci-Fi), in which Eric Stoltz follows a little too closely in his father's footsteps and ends up turned into an insect, just like dear old dad. Watch for Daphne Zuniga of "Melrose Place" as the love interest.
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