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Eric Smith

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NEWS
April 27, 2000
Anthony Eric Smith, a former U.S. Postal Service employee, died Sunday in his sleep of a heart attack at his Walbrook home. He was 51. In the 1970s, he worked for the Postal Service's parcel post division and was a Baltimore public schools substitute teacher. Born in Baltimore, he was a 1967 graduate of City College. His 1969 marriage to Wanda Mason ended in divorce. He was a member and former acolyte at St. Mary the Virgin Episcopal Church, 3121 Walbrook Ave., where a requiem Mass will be offered at 10 a.m. today.
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SPORTS
Mike Preston | May 13, 2011
Three years ago, attackman Eric Smith chose Ohio State over the University of Delaware because he wanted a university much bigger than the high school he attended, Boys' Latin. Delaware head lacrosse coach Bob Shillinglaw thought there might have been another reason. Smith's older brother, Alex, played for the Blue Hens and became one of the top face-off specialists in the history of the college game from 2004-2008. Maybe the younger Smith wanted to escape his brother's shadow.
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NEWS
January 4, 2008
A new light will shine in Heaven with our deepest heartfelt sadness, we regret to inform you of the sudden passing of our dear friend and colleague, DALE ERIC SMITH of Columbia, MD on Saturday, December 29, 2007. Our beloved Mr. Dale was called home to rest after a short illness at St. Joseph's Hospital. His remains are being returned to his native home of Seattle, Washington, where he will rest next to his loving mother, Gladys who preceded him in death. Remembrances may be directed to the National Diabetes Foundation in memory of Mr. Dale Eric Smith.
NEWS
January 4, 2008
A new light will shine in Heaven with our deepest heartfelt sadness, we regret to inform you of the sudden passing of our dear friend and colleague, DALE ERIC SMITH of Columbia, MD on Saturday, December 29, 2007. Our beloved Mr. Dale was called home to rest after a short illness at St. Joseph's Hospital. His remains are being returned to his native home of Seattle, Washington, where he will rest next to his loving mother, Gladys who preceded him in death. Remembrances may be directed to the National Diabetes Foundation in memory of Mr. Dale Eric Smith.
NEWS
July 17, 2005
On Friday July 15, 2005, YVETTE MARY SMITH, 84, of Salisbury, formerly of Woodlawn, MD, died in the Peninsula Regional Medical Center, in Salisbury. Born in Canada, she was the daughter of the late Magliore and Florida (Dumont) Caron. She was preceded in death by her husband, Eric SMith. She and her husband owned Smith's Lamp Shop in Alexandria, VA. She was a Lioness in the Woodlawn Lions CLub. She loved gardening and nature. She is survived by three children, Kevin Lee Smith of Delmar, MD, David Eric Smith and his wife Sheryl of Magnolia, DE and Joyce Anne Hardesty and her husband Donald of South Carolina, 7 grandchildren, 3 great-grandchildren, two sisters, Leone C. Walls of Weymouth, MA and Theresa C. Coffin of Millinocket, ME and numerous nieces and nephews.
NEWS
February 14, 2006
On Saturday, February 11, 2006, DAVID M., beloved son of the late Albert Smith, Sr. and Elizabeth Sudina Smith, devoted husband of the late Dorothy Jean Smith, loving father and father-in-law of Lynn and Mark Gondeck, devoted grandfather of David M., Jennifer Lynn and Mark Travis Gondeck. Also survived by nephews Douglas Wright, D.D.S., Gregory Wright, Eric Smith and Carl Smith. He was predeceased by brother Albert Smith, Jr. and by sister Dolores Wright. Funeral services wil be held at the Pritts Funeral Home and Chapel, 412 Washington Road, Westminster on Wednesday at 1 P.M. Interment will be in Lake View Memorial Park.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | March 15, 2006
As of yesterday, 20 people had applied to be the next superintendent of the Anne Arundel County public schools. Though the number of applicants is lower than for other recent superintendent searches in the state, it's the quality of the applicants that matters, said Bea Gordon, who is conducting the search for the county's next schools' chief. "There have been comparisons with some searches that had 60 or 20. ... What we're looking for are people who meet the qualifications," Gordon said.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2002
Demon Brown has traveled from the Murphy Homes projects on Baltimore's west side to a peaceful Southern academic setting on the campus of the University of North Carolina-Charlotte. Brown, who left the city for Baltimore County's Randallstown High in the 11th and 12th grades, is so content in his new environment that the love of his life, basketball, even pales a little in comparison with the new tension-free atmosphere. Sure, the 6-foot-1 sophomore point guard for the always-strong 49ers (16-8 overall, 10-3 in Conference USA)
NEWS
January 11, 2004
Start assessing school administrators With a county-wide increase in high school students who make a 2.0 GPA or below, with almost half of Anne Arundel County's ninth-grade algebra students making D's or E's, with low teacher morale, with oversized classes, with diminished curriculum in middle school and elementary school, isn't it time to perhaps expand school assessment to our school administrators? When Dr. Smith was in North Carolina, [that] state and Smith's own "high standards" led to what the Charlotte Observer called, "a dangerous downside that state leaders have widely ignored: a dramatic rise in dropouts.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | May 10, 1991
Federal prosecutors in Baltimore have filed criminal charges against seven men connected to two former Maryland surety brokerages that secured bonding for contractors and subcontractors involved in government construction work.The false statement, false claims and wire fraud charges are contained in grand jury indictments against the seven, who are out-of-state businessmen and self-styled entrepreneurs.Assistant U.S. Attorneys Susan M. Ringler and Stuart A. Berman said the indictments are the products of a continuing investigation by the FBI, the Army Criminal Investigation Command, the Defense Criminal Investigative Service and the inspectors general of several federal departments.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | March 15, 2006
As of yesterday, 20 people had applied to be the next superintendent of the Anne Arundel County public schools. Though the number of applicants is lower than for other recent superintendent searches in the state, it's the quality of the applicants that matters, said Bea Gordon, who is conducting the search for the county's next schools' chief. "There have been comparisons with some searches that had 60 or 20. ... What we're looking for are people who meet the qualifications," Gordon said.
NEWS
February 14, 2006
On Saturday, February 11, 2006, DAVID M., beloved son of the late Albert Smith, Sr. and Elizabeth Sudina Smith, devoted husband of the late Dorothy Jean Smith, loving father and father-in-law of Lynn and Mark Gondeck, devoted grandfather of David M., Jennifer Lynn and Mark Travis Gondeck. Also survived by nephews Douglas Wright, D.D.S., Gregory Wright, Eric Smith and Carl Smith. He was predeceased by brother Albert Smith, Jr. and by sister Dolores Wright. Funeral services wil be held at the Pritts Funeral Home and Chapel, 412 Washington Road, Westminster on Wednesday at 1 P.M. Interment will be in Lake View Memorial Park.
NEWS
September 18, 2005
Last week, The Sun asked readers for their views on schools Superintendent Eric J. Smith's decision to leave his job Nov. 23 to take a position with Harvard University. Here are some of the responses. Parent impressed with superintendent I have a daughter who attends Piney Orchard Elementary School in Odenton. I left an ill-managed school system in Prince George's County, and I was attracted to the efficient management, diversity and improved test scores in Anne Arundel County. This is my first year in this school system, and my daughter and I were excited about experiencing a different approach to learning.
NEWS
July 17, 2005
On Friday July 15, 2005, YVETTE MARY SMITH, 84, of Salisbury, formerly of Woodlawn, MD, died in the Peninsula Regional Medical Center, in Salisbury. Born in Canada, she was the daughter of the late Magliore and Florida (Dumont) Caron. She was preceded in death by her husband, Eric SMith. She and her husband owned Smith's Lamp Shop in Alexandria, VA. She was a Lioness in the Woodlawn Lions CLub. She loved gardening and nature. She is survived by three children, Kevin Lee Smith of Delmar, MD, David Eric Smith and his wife Sheryl of Magnolia, DE and Joyce Anne Hardesty and her husband Donald of South Carolina, 7 grandchildren, 3 great-grandchildren, two sisters, Leone C. Walls of Weymouth, MA and Theresa C. Coffin of Millinocket, ME and numerous nieces and nephews.
NEWS
January 11, 2004
Start assessing school administrators With a county-wide increase in high school students who make a 2.0 GPA or below, with almost half of Anne Arundel County's ninth-grade algebra students making D's or E's, with low teacher morale, with oversized classes, with diminished curriculum in middle school and elementary school, isn't it time to perhaps expand school assessment to our school administrators? When Dr. Smith was in North Carolina, [that] state and Smith's own "high standards" led to what the Charlotte Observer called, "a dangerous downside that state leaders have widely ignored: a dramatic rise in dropouts.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2003
CHANGES ARE happening in Anne Arundel County public schools - on that all sides seem to agree. Since Eric J. Smith took over as superintendent in July, he has begun shaking up the 75,000-student school system, indicating that he wants to run a tight ship. Smith is placing the county's schools on uniform class schedules. He plans to invest heavily in new textbooks, so that students in all schools will be, quite literally, on the same page. He also has begun academic initiatives to close achievement gaps among groups of students.
FEATURES
By Robin Givhan and Robin Givhan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 19, 1990
NEW YORK-- As menswear becomes clean, simple and basic, furnishings get flashy, frivolous and creative.As soon as men figured out that retro patterns were trendy on ties, florals came into vogue. Before the floral rage could burn itself out, faces and objects adorned the newest ties. Now fashion watchers suspect a move to resurrect stripes.At New York's Designers' Collective, creators of neckwear experimented with novelty patterns.Artfully Tied, a group of seven artists, focused on hand painted and screen printed images inspired by sources such as Soviet posters and folk art. Brian Bubb favored apples and beach balls.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 6, 2003
AM I going to continue to buy Martha Stewart sheets? Will I make Martha's Star-Spangled Banner Fourth of July cake again, using raspberries for the red stripes and blueberries as the field for the little white stars that I will pipe from a pastry bag loaded with Martha's cream-cheese frosting? You can count on it, darling. It's a tradition in our house, and I wouldn't think of giving it up for the world. Not for the world, I tell you! Every Fourth of July, we pull last year's sheets off the beds and turn them into red-white-and-blue bunting for the front windows of our charming Dutch colonial.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 6, 2003
AM I going to continue to buy Martha Stewart sheets? Will I make Martha's Star-Spangled Banner Fourth of July cake again, using raspberries for the red stripes and blueberries as the field for the little white stars that I will pipe from a pastry bag loaded with Martha's cream-cheese frosting? You can count on it, darling. It's a tradition in our house, and I wouldn't think of giving it up for the world. Not for the world, I tell you! Every Fourth of July, we pull last year's sheets off the beds and turn them into red-white-and-blue bunting for the front windows of our charming Dutch colonial.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2002
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - The numbers were confounding. Black students in Charlotte continued to score well below whites on the SAT. Superintendent Eric J. Smith knew this shouldn't be. He had made classes tougher, reformed the curriculum and put in place programs to help minority students succeed. He asked his number crunchers to investigate. A month into last school year, they found the culprit. In middle school, teachers were putting black pupils in regular and remedial classes to avoid failure.
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