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By The Denver Post | November 17, 2006
Denver -- Even though he admits he has no idea where it came from, Eric Schlosser is eating the chicken. His willingness to surrender to the whims of the food chain comes as a surprise to those who lunch with Schlosser, author of the 2001 best-seller Fast Food Nation and the journalist who almost singlehandedly launched American hand-wringing about processed food. "I'm not afraid of food," said Schlosser, tucking into a glazed chicken breast recently at a bistro. For the record, Schlosser also ordered the spinach, just after an E. coli outbreak had virtually wiped that vegetable off grocery shelves.
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By The Denver Post | November 17, 2006
Denver -- Even though he admits he has no idea where it came from, Eric Schlosser is eating the chicken. His willingness to surrender to the whims of the food chain comes as a surprise to those who lunch with Schlosser, author of the 2001 best-seller Fast Food Nation and the journalist who almost singlehandedly launched American hand-wringing about processed food. "I'm not afraid of food," said Schlosser, tucking into a glazed chicken breast recently at a bistro. For the record, Schlosser also ordered the spinach, just after an E. coli outbreak had virtually wiped that vegetable off grocery shelves.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2001
In his new book, "Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal," author Eric Schlosser takes a hard look at the business practices of this country's gigantic fast-food industry - and finds them lacking. Americans spent more than $110 billion on fast food in 2000, Schlosser says, more than on higher education, personal computers, computer software or new cars. Schlosser scrutinizes the industry from the way it sells its food to the way companies hire workers to the way they prepare the food and even the way food bought from suppliers is produced and processed.
NEWS
June 29, 2003
The average American eats more than 30 pounds of french fries each year. -- Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser (HarperCollins)
NEWS
June 29, 2003
The average American eats more than 30 pounds of french fries each year. -- Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser (HarperCollins)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 25, 2001
Published gift lists and holiday "roundups" -- whether they're for literature or lollypops -- have always struck me as trivial at best and, more likely, condescending. If you want to give books to your friends, you had better know a lot more about their tastes than an unknown editor possibly can. James Bready's invaluable annual survey of books from and about Maryland, which we publish here this week and next, offers -- I hope -- almost the same usefulness as a thoughtful walk in a first-rate bookshop stocked with local works.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 14, 2001
Every day, a quarter of the adults in the United States go to fast-food restaurants -- spending, in the year 2000, more than $110 billion. That's more than $1 a day per person. More than on higher education or new cars. More than on movies, books, magazines, newspapers, videos and recorded music combined. The premier fast-food chain is the largest owner of retail property on Earth. According to one serious study of iconography, its signature symbol -- "The Golden Arches" -- has become internationally "more widely recognized than the Christian cross."
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By Michael Sragow | July 31, 2009
Food, Inc. **** ( 4 STARS) Documentary maker Robert Kenner rarely sacrifices humanity for horror or humor for sarcasm in this vivid, even playful expose of American supermarket food and fast food. He stimulates our eyes and engages our sympathies as agricultural heroes as well as journalists Eric Schlosser and Michael Pollan lay out the reasons for buying healthy food. A perfect dinner-date movie - if you eat at a place that uses local and organic food. Opening next Friday A Perfect Getaway: (Rogue)
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
Slow down and dare to be great: That's my message to Richard Linklater, the audacious director of A Scanner Darkly. He's at a time in his career when he seems ready to follow through on any notion he finds in his creative kitchen down in Austin, Texas, then deliver it to the public no matter what stage it is in the baking process. Don't get me wrong: A Scanner Darkly isn't half-baked. It's more three-quarters-baked, and it took years to get its complicated animation to the point where it expressed the scary ups and downs of the characters and the paranoid terrors of their drug-riddled world.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 3, 2009
A scary movie that's also funny, touching and good for you - that's Robert Kenner's documentary about the American food industry, Food, Inc. In a decade when fiction filmmakers everywhere have been struggling to revamp conspiracy thrillers from the 1960s and 1970s (most recently German director Tom Tykwer in the Clive Owen-Naomi Watts vehicle The International), Kenner, best known for his work on PBS' American Experience, pulls it off with humor and humanity. Right from the brilliant opening credits, he treats the contemporary supermarket as a carnival fun house - brightly painted, cunningly designed, full of false signals and outright traps.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 25, 2001
Published gift lists and holiday "roundups" -- whether they're for literature or lollypops -- have always struck me as trivial at best and, more likely, condescending. If you want to give books to your friends, you had better know a lot more about their tastes than an unknown editor possibly can. James Bready's invaluable annual survey of books from and about Maryland, which we publish here this week and next, offers -- I hope -- almost the same usefulness as a thoughtful walk in a first-rate bookshop stocked with local works.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2001
In his new book, "Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal," author Eric Schlosser takes a hard look at the business practices of this country's gigantic fast-food industry - and finds them lacking. Americans spent more than $110 billion on fast food in 2000, Schlosser says, more than on higher education, personal computers, computer software or new cars. Schlosser scrutinizes the industry from the way it sells its food to the way companies hire workers to the way they prepare the food and even the way food bought from suppliers is produced and processed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 14, 2001
Every day, a quarter of the adults in the United States go to fast-food restaurants -- spending, in the year 2000, more than $110 billion. That's more than $1 a day per person. More than on higher education or new cars. More than on movies, books, magazines, newspapers, videos and recorded music combined. The premier fast-food chain is the largest owner of retail property on Earth. According to one serious study of iconography, its signature symbol -- "The Golden Arches" -- has become internationally "more widely recognized than the Christian cross."
FEATURES
By Cynthia Dockrell and Cynthia Dockrell,Boston Globe | August 28, 1994
Stories about the drug trade are easy hits for journalists. Colorful characters, eye-popping sums of cash, murder, cops, good guys and bad guys -- it's all there, the tried-and-true fodder of news-as-morality-play. We seem to be hooked on such stories. But how often do we get the good stuff, the stories that satisfy on a level beyond the lurid?Readers will find two this week, in the latest New Yorker (Aug. 22 and Aug. 29, a double issue) and the September Atlantic. New Yorker reporter-at-large William Finnegan goes into San Augustine County in "Deep East Texas" to show what happened after the sheriff of 40 years stepped down and crack moved in. In San Augustine, a relic of the Old South still largely segregated, Mr. Finnegan writes, "People talk about 'the sheriff' . . . as though he were an intimate, fundamental, inescapable fact of life, like oxygen."
NEWS
By Tim Swift | November 1, 2009
TV 'V': Elizabeth Mitchell of "Lost" (above) stars in this polished revamp of the '80s classic. Some of the surprise may be gone. (We already know that the "peaceful" alien visitors are really evil lizard people with a hankering for live meat.) But it may be even scarier (for the GOP at least); these visitors promise universal health care. Airs 8 p.m. Tuesday on WMAR, Channel 2. THEATER Stoop Storytelling Series: The popular monologue show is hungry for more tales from Baltimoreans.
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