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By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - Ronald Smith lost an index finger and part of one thumb. Emily Lyons lost an eye. Fallon Stubbs lost her mother. The losses came not because of anything they did, nor anything they said. It was just happenstance. Just the result of being in the wrong place when bombs exploded. It has been a few years, and chances are you've forgotten their names, if you ever knew them at all. I came across them while doing a computer search to see how many times the name of accused serial bomber Eric Rudolph and the word "sympathy" have appeared together in the news media since his arrest May 31 in North Carolina.
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NEWS
By Frank James and Frank James,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - Responding to criticism that an earlier version of its proposed airline-passenger screening program would have greatly invaded individual privacy, the Transportation Security Administration unveiled a scaled-back version yesterday that was generally welcomed by civil libertarians. But some critics warned that the new program, though significantly improved, still raised civil liberties issues. There also were fears that the program would expand beyond air travel into other areas of daily life.
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NEWS
By Frank James and Frank James,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - Responding to criticism that an earlier version of its proposed airline-passenger screening program would have greatly invaded individual privacy, the Transportation Security Administration unveiled a scaled-back version yesterday that was generally welcomed by civil libertarians. But some critics warned that the new program, though significantly improved, still raised civil liberties issues. There also were fears that the program would expand beyond air travel into other areas of daily life.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - Ronald Smith lost an index finger and part of one thumb. Emily Lyons lost an eye. Fallon Stubbs lost her mother. The losses came not because of anything they did, nor anything they said. It was just happenstance. Just the result of being in the wrong place when bombs exploded. It has been a few years, and chances are you've forgotten their names, if you ever knew them at all. I came across them while doing a computer search to see how many times the name of accused serial bomber Eric Rudolph and the word "sympathy" have appeared together in the news media since his arrest May 31 in North Carolina.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2003
MURPHY, N.C. - When the net finally closed on Eric Rudolph, his captor was not a federal agent but a small-town police officer who had worn a badge barely eight months. Yesterday, the pride of this town of 1,650 was 21-year-old Jeff Postell, who arrested Rudolph while on routine patrol behind a Sav-a-Lot supermarket. The arrest placed Postell at the center of a moment in history that most police officers only dream about. The officer played it down as being "just in a day's work." But it marked an auspicious career start for a young man who had nurtured hopes of becoming a police officer even before graduating from Murphy High School a few years ago. As a teen-ager, Postell had joined Explorers chapters in Murphy and up the road in Andrews.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Johns Hopkins men's coach Dave Pietramala, North Carolina women's coach Jenny Levy (Roland Park) and former Washington Capitals center Bill Clement will be among the speakers at January's US Lacrosse National Convention, the organization announced Thursday. Among the other men's speakers are coaches John Danowski of Duke, Paul Cantabene of Stevenson, Jeff Tambroni of Penn State, Kevin Corrigan of Notre Dame, Lars Tiffany of Brown and Peter Milliman of Cornell. The speakers for the women's game will include Georgetown head coach Ricky Fried, Penn State head coach Missy Doherty (Maryland, St. Mary's)
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
They sit in the back room of a farmhouse in the woods, the veterans alongside the rookies. Soon enough they'll be walking the beat, gearing up for the long, hot summer. But first, a briefing on current conditions: "We've got a guy coming south out of Massachusetts," says the briefer. "He's going into shelters and talking about Armageddon and the end of the world. It scares some people. Before long he's going to run into a northbounder who is camouflagued and traumatized by the gulf war."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2003
Some carry bits of shrapnel deep within their flesh; others avoid crowded places or start at loud sounds. But for those injured in the bombings for which authorities blame Eric Rudolph, the knowledge that he remained free was as excruciating as the physical and psychic wounds. "I couldn't stop picturing him out there on the run," said Fallon Stubbs, 20, whose mother, Alice S. Hawthorne, died in the bombing at Olympic Park in Atlanta in 1996. The blast, which injured 111 people, left Stubbs with scars that run up and down her leg and arm. "To be honest, I never thought he'd be caught - that he had won, and that we had lost," she said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 7, 1998
ATLANTA -- Officially, federal authorities have listed Eric Robert Rudolph as a material witness to the bombing Jan. 29 of an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Ala., that killed a police officer and seriously injured a nurse.But the intensive nature of the weeklong manhunt for Rudolph suggests that investigators believe the 31-year-old North Carolinian may be a key to solving a series of violent attacks that stretch over 18 months, including three bombings in the Atlanta area.Since witnesses reported seeing Rudolph's gray Nissan pickup truck at the scene of the Birmingham bombing, federal agents have swarmed through the mountains of western North Carolina, searching the house and mobile home where he lived and sifting fTC through storage rooms that he rented.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2003
MURPHY, N.C. - After leading investigators on one of the most exhaustive manhunts in history, Eric Rudolph, the wily survivalist charged with the fatal bombing at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta and three other bombing attacks, was arrested yesterday morning behind a supermarket, digging through a trash bin. Rudolph, who had vanished into the thick forests of Appalachia, surfaced in the very corner of rural North Carolina where the search began five years...
NEWS
By Ellen Barry and Jenny Jarvie and Ellen Barry and Jenny Jarvie,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 14, 2005
ATLANTA - Olympic park bomber Eric Rudolph, who led federal authorities on a five-year cat-and-mouse game in the woods of North Carolina, showed a defiant face in court yesterday, boasting in a statement that he had "deprived the government of its goal of sentencing me to death." Rudolph pleaded guilty yesterday to four bombings as part of a plea agreement that will allow him to escape the death penalty. In the morning, he appeared before a judge in Birmingham, Ala., where he pleaded guilty in the 1998 bombing of a clinic that performed abortions.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
Baltimore County police have consulted behavioral experts, FBI profilers, friends, family and associates to help them understand -- and find -- Joseph C. Palczynski. Yet, after an intensive, six-day search for Palczynski, they say they are battling unfavorable terrain and a suspect who had apparently made painstaking preparations to survive in the woods and wetlands of eastern Baltimore County. "He is our Eric Rudolph," said Baltimore County Police Chief Terrence B. Sheridan, referring to the suspect in several bombings who is believed to have been hiding in the mountains of North Carolina since 1998.
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