Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEric Roberts
IN THE NEWS

Eric Roberts

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By BILL FREE | October 8, 2006
John Carroll senior Eric Roberts is pulling double duty this fall, playing football and soccer. Roberts said he was "baited into it" by a couple of friends after playing soccer as a freshman and sophomore and football as a junior. He is a kicker on the football team and has converted 12 straight extra-point attempts. Roberts is a defender on the soccer team and has scored two game-winning goals this season, one against Archbishop Curley to hand the Friars their only loss and the other against C. Milton Wright.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Wayne Shipley returned to Chesapeake Arts Center last weekend to host the premiere of his second independent Western film, "Day of the Gun. " Before his filmmaking career, Shipley taught English and theater arts for 30 years at Andover and North County high schools. Then, in retirement, Shipley brought his extensive background to Chesapeake Arts Center in 1998 as the center's first executive director, establishing Chesapeake's firm base as a regional arts venue before leaving in spring 2004.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2005
Eric Roberts knew that kicking was in his genes, and last winter he began the conversion from soccer player to place-kicker. He wanted to take over as John Carroll's kicker, a position previously held by both of his older brothers. He started kicking regularly and then spent the summer trying to learn the intricacies of the job that many try, but at which few succeed. His brother Dean was the Patriots' kicker last year while playing soccer, and his other brother Chris worked as the kicker before that.
NEWS
By BILL FREE | October 8, 2006
John Carroll senior Eric Roberts is pulling double duty this fall, playing football and soccer. Roberts said he was "baited into it" by a couple of friends after playing soccer as a freshman and sophomore and football as a junior. He is a kicker on the football team and has converted 12 straight extra-point attempts. Roberts is a defender on the soccer team and has scored two game-winning goals this season, one against Archbishop Curley to hand the Friars their only loss and the other against C. Milton Wright.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
Navy quarterback Craig Candeto looks into his offensive backfield and sees a changed man in Eric Roberts. Roberts always has been blessed with eye-catching ability. At 5 feet 10, 193 pounds with a vertical leap of 34.6 inches and the speed to cover the 40-yard dash in 4.56 seconds, Roberts is plenty equipped to play slotback in coach Paul Johnson's spread offense. As a sophomore in his first varsity season in Annapolis last fall, Roberts flashed enticing glimpses of his skills by averaging 8.1 yards on 58 carries.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 17, 2003
The one daring joke in the action comedy National Security comes near the beginning. A black man, Martin Lawrence, gets a white cop, Steve Zahn, tossed into prison when a videocam captures the officer clubbing him without mercy. But the audience knows that the tape lies: Zahn was trying to beat away a bumblebee because Lawrence is allergic to the insect. This gleefully unfair reversal gets viewers hoping for the freewheeling racial vaudeville of an Undercover Brother. What ensues, unfortunately, is yet another odd-couple car-chase movie in which the cocky, gabby African-American and the righteous, taciturn Caucasian trade punches and bond before they bag the bad guys.
FEATURES
September 27, 1997
ABC brings together three dramas -- two new, one returning -- it hopes may actually convince people to watch TV on Saturday nights.First comes former Oscar nominee Eric Roberts (brother of Julia) as the leader of an elite FBI unit in "C-16" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2). Its missions tonight: find a kidnapped child (who may have been abducted by one of his "grieving" parents) and rescue a colleague who's ventured a little too deep undercover.A pair of Jameses, Remar and Belushi, play partners in a security agency in "Total Security" (9 p.m.-10 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 7, 1992
LET'S INVENT a new disease. Let's call it "dementia Hitchcox" and define it as a brain inflammation primarily afflicting young movie directors who've seen too much Alfred Hitchcock. In its grip they come to believe the delusion that it is possible to make an Alfred Hitchcock film if they are not Alfred Hitchcock."Final Analysis" is a case of "dementia Hitchcox" that ought to go into the textbooks.The movie is "Vertigo" freeze-dried, calorie-leached, flavor-drained, frozen in a little plastic sack and then fired up in the old Hollywood radar range for a mere $20 million or so. The silky Richard Gere is cast in the Jimmy Stewart part as a naif who falls in love with a blond goddess, which in turn makes him vulnerable to a dastardly plot involving murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 7, 1992
Let's invent a new disease. Let's call it "dementia hitchcox" and define it as a brain inflammation primarily afflicting young movie directors who've seen too much Alfred Hitchcock. In its grip they come to believe the delusion that it is possible to make an Alfred Hitchcock film if they are not Alfred Hitchcock."Final Analysis" is a case of "dementia Hitchcox" that ought to go into the textbooks.The movie is "Vertigo" freeze-dried, calorie-leached, flavor-drained, frozen in a little plastic sack and then fired up in the old Hollywood radar range for a mere $20 million or so. The silky Richard Gere is cast in the Jimmy Stewart part as a naif who falls in love with a blond goddess, which in turn makes him vulnerable to a dastardly plot involving murder.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Wayne Shipley returned to Chesapeake Arts Center last weekend to host the premiere of his second independent Western film, "Day of the Gun. " Before his filmmaking career, Shipley taught English and theater arts for 30 years at Andover and North County high schools. Then, in retirement, Shipley brought his extensive background to Chesapeake Arts Center in 1998 as the center's first executive director, establishing Chesapeake's firm base as a regional arts venue before leaving in spring 2004.
NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2005
Eric Roberts knew that kicking was in his genes, and last winter he began the conversion from soccer player to place-kicker. He wanted to take over as John Carroll's kicker, a position previously held by both of his older brothers. He started kicking regularly and then spent the summer trying to learn the intricacies of the job that many try, but at which few succeed. His brother Dean was the Patriots' kicker last year while playing soccer, and his other brother Chris worked as the kicker before that.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2004
Frank Divis is considered the best blocker among Navy's corps of slotbacks. Eric Roberts is a proven commodity as the most dangerous slotback on the team, a player who entered this season with an 8.6-yard rushing average and a school-record 24.9-yard average on pass receptions. So, how come Divis has outgained Roberts by better than a 4-to-1 margin in the first two games? In a notable role reversal, Divis has carried for 102 yards, a team-best 12.8 average and a touchdown; Roberts has run for a paltry 23 yards, only the third-highest total by a slotback (Trey Hines is also ahead of him)
SPORTS
By Brian McTaggart and Brian McTaggart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 2003
HOUSTON - Only minutes after yesterday's game against Rice, the jubilant Navy locker room was rocking. And for good reason. Behind a tremendous performance from quarterback Craig Candeto, the Midshipmen improved to 5-2 by routing the Owls, 38-6, before 27,832 at Rice Stadium for Navy's first three-game winning streak since 1997. Candeto rushed for 151 yards and two touchdowns on a career-high 36 carries as the nation's top-ranked rushing attack amassed 366 yards on 69 carries. Navy held the overmatched Owls to a season-low 223 yards of total offense and no touchdowns.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
LANDOVER - Navy coach Paul Johnson has talked so much about dragging this football program out of its doldrums and taking a huge leap forward. Yesterday, after he watched the Midshipmen drop heavily favored rival Air Force at FedEx Field with a grinding performance, after he watched junior fullback Kyle Eckel bowl over the Falcons with the game of his life, after he watched his team make so many crucial plays, Johnson stuck out his chest while he talked...
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2003
While winning two of its first three games and creating some buzz about a turnaround after years of futility, Navy had done so many things right. Then came Saturday's 48-27 loss at Rutgers, where the Midshipmen brought back a host of bad memories befitting a program aiming for only its third winning season since 1982. Navy (2-2) entered the contest leading the NCAA in turnover margin, then committed a season-high three miscues, each of them a lost fumble. Its defense came into New Jersey ranked eighth in the nation in average points allowed, and against a bigger, faster Rutgers offense, missed too many tackles, yielded too many long running plays and stopped the Scarlet Knights only three times on 13 third-down attempts.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
Navy quarterback Craig Candeto looks into his offensive backfield and sees a changed man in Eric Roberts. Roberts always has been blessed with eye-catching ability. At 5 feet 10, 193 pounds with a vertical leap of 34.6 inches and the speed to cover the 40-yard dash in 4.56 seconds, Roberts is plenty equipped to play slotback in coach Paul Johnson's spread offense. As a sophomore in his first varsity season in Annapolis last fall, Roberts flashed enticing glimpses of his skills by averaging 8.1 yards on 58 carries.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2002
Through Navy's first three games, one thing has been obvious: Sophomore running back Eric Roberts can take your breath away every time he touches the ball. Most of the time that's a good thing. But not all the time. "Eric Roberts makes a bunch of plays, and he makes a bunch of big yards, but he needs to learn to play for 60 minutes, too," said a visibly irritated coach Paul Johnson after the Mids' 49-40 loss to Northwestern on Saturday. Roberts' brilliance and his wavering focus can be summed on one play from that game.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2003
While winning two of its first three games and creating some buzz about a turnaround after years of futility, Navy had done so many things right. Then came Saturday's 48-27 loss at Rutgers, where the Midshipmen brought back a host of bad memories befitting a program aiming for only its third winning season since 1982. Navy (2-2) entered the contest leading the NCAA in turnover margin, then committed a season-high three miscues, each of them a lost fumble. Its defense came into New Jersey ranked eighth in the nation in average points allowed, and against a bigger, faster Rutgers offense, missed too many tackles, yielded too many long running plays and stopped the Scarlet Knights only three times on 13 third-down attempts.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 17, 2003
The one daring joke in the action comedy National Security comes near the beginning. A black man, Martin Lawrence, gets a white cop, Steve Zahn, tossed into prison when a videocam captures the officer clubbing him without mercy. But the audience knows that the tape lies: Zahn was trying to beat away a bumblebee because Lawrence is allergic to the insect. This gleefully unfair reversal gets viewers hoping for the freewheeling racial vaudeville of an Undercover Brother. What ensues, unfortunately, is yet another odd-couple car-chase movie in which the cocky, gabby African-American and the righteous, taciturn Caucasian trade punches and bond before they bag the bad guys.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2002
Through Navy's first three games, one thing has been obvious: Sophomore running back Eric Roberts can take your breath away every time he touches the ball. Most of the time that's a good thing. But not all the time. "Eric Roberts makes a bunch of plays, and he makes a bunch of big yards, but he needs to learn to play for 60 minutes, too," said a visibly irritated coach Paul Johnson after the Mids' 49-40 loss to Northwestern on Saturday. Roberts' brilliance and his wavering focus can be summed on one play from that game.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.