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Eric Bogosian

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By Hap Erstein and Hap Erstein,COX NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 1995
Eric Bogosian makes his living being angry. And on the theatrical Richter scale, his newest show is off the charts."This show rants," he says of "Wake Up and Smell the Coffee," the 90-minute, stand-up-comic hectoring he will bring to Center Stage Friday and Saturday.How angry is it? Mr. Bogosian explains, sort of. "When bikers hang around with bikers, they're just having a good time. But if you hung around with bikers, they'd probably scare you."And that's what I'm doing," he says. "It's biker theater.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 26, 1999
Unlikely as it might sound, Eric Bogosian -- he of the angry, violent, profanity-strewn monologues -- has written a comedy of manners."Griller," which is making its East Coast debut at Center Stage under David Warren's direction, is Bogosian's take on morality, family and society in suburban America in the late 1990s.Compared to his monologues, "Griller," in which Bogosian does not appear, is surprisingly tame and ultimately affirmative. Bogosian, a counterculture performance artist and product of the anti-establishment late 1960s and early 1970s, has written a play promoting -- of all things -- family values.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | January 22, 1995
Has Eric Bogosian been domesticated? Become kinder and gentler?L The idea seems as incongruous as a sheep in wolf's clothing.Yet that's the claim made by this intense, even abrasive %J performer, who's best known for the take-no-prisoners approach his one-man shows."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | November 21, 1999
It's a beauty, all right, several thousand dollars worth of American barbecue luxury. All that stainless steel gleaming beneath a suburban sky, enough room under the hood to grill a couple of racks of lamb and the side burner for some nice peppers and onions, with steel shelves for sauces, marinade, plates of burgers. On the stage it's a Volkswagen-sized metaphor for life after drugs and rock and roll, a marker of roads not taken.A few years ago, playwright/ actor Eric Bogosian spotted a barbecue grill much like it in a Hammacher Schlemmer catalog.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 17, 1991
Eric Bogosian can be a street bum, a TV evangelist, a drug-wasted punk or a motor-mouth DJ. His characters spew venom and foul language; they reek of self-absorption, hypocrisy and addictions of every conceivable variety.Even the more upwardly mobile types who populate "Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll" -- the anthology of monologues he'll be performing Saturday and next Sunday at the Baltimore Museum of Art -- resemble something you'd scrape off the bottom of your shoe.Yet the 37-year-old Mr. Bogosian (pronounced bo-GO-shun)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 26, 1999
Unlikely as it might sound, Eric Bogosian -- he of the angry, violent, profanity-strewn monologues -- has written a comedy of manners."Griller," which is making its East Coast debut at Center Stage under David Warren's direction, is Bogosian's take on morality, family and society in suburban America in the late 1990s.Compared to his monologues, "Griller," in which Bogosian does not appear, is surprisingly tame and ultimately affirmative. Bogosian, a counterculture performance artist and product of the anti-establishment late 1960s and early 1970s, has written a play promoting -- of all things -- family values.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | November 21, 1999
It's a beauty, all right, several thousand dollars worth of American barbecue luxury. All that stainless steel gleaming beneath a suburban sky, enough room under the hood to grill a couple of racks of lamb and the side burner for some nice peppers and onions, with steel shelves for sauces, marinade, plates of burgers. On the stage it's a Volkswagen-sized metaphor for life after drugs and rock and roll, a marker of roads not taken.A few years ago, playwright/ actor Eric Bogosian spotted a barbecue grill much like it in a Hammacher Schlemmer catalog.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 19, 1998
Performance artist Danny Hoch has been known to step outside the theater and drum up trade among the kids on the street."I see 50 kids playing basketball who live across from the theater and have never been there. I tell them, 'Yo, there's this kid across the street, he's [bleeping] hysterical, you should see it before it goes to HBO.' "It's not that theaters have trouble filling seats for this 27-year-old solo performer, whose newest show, "Jails, Hospitals & Hip Hop," begins a three-day engagement at Center Stage's Off Center Festival tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | September 9, 1999
From a controversial performance artist to Rodgers and Hammerstein, from the gritty sensibility of Eric Bogosian to a hit musical about a sinking ship, area theaters will usher in the new century with a little of everything this season.Musical lovers have a mix of old and new to choose from, starting at the Lyric Opera House on Sept. 21, when Richard Chamberlain plays Captain von Trapp in the Broadway revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "The Sound of Music." In December, Maury Yeston and Peter Stone's 1997 Tony Award-winning musical, "Titanic," sails into the Mechanic Theatre, which will also present the 1998 Tony-winning revival of Kander and Ebb's "Cabaret" next June.
NEWS
By Joe Garofoli and Joe Garofoli,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 1997
Richard Linklater laughs at the juxtaposition. The writer/director of "Slacker," the movie that inspired the pop-culture term, is dining at San Francisco's posh Ritz-Carlton hotel. You can easily pick out the erstwhile slacker in the sea of dark suits and white hair; he's the one in the thermal pullover and jeans.This isn't a case of Slacker Goes Nob Hill. It's just Hollywood custom that Castle Rock Entertainment would house the director of its new film, "subUrbia," in swank digs. Yet six years after "Slacker" introduced Linklater to the world, the 35-year-old remains anti-Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | September 9, 1999
From a controversial performance artist to Rodgers and Hammerstein, from the gritty sensibility of Eric Bogosian to a hit musical about a sinking ship, area theaters will usher in the new century with a little of everything this season.Musical lovers have a mix of old and new to choose from, starting at the Lyric Opera House on Sept. 21, when Richard Chamberlain plays Captain von Trapp in the Broadway revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "The Sound of Music." In December, Maury Yeston and Peter Stone's 1997 Tony Award-winning musical, "Titanic," sails into the Mechanic Theatre, which will also present the 1998 Tony-winning revival of Kander and Ebb's "Cabaret" next June.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 19, 1998
Performance artist Danny Hoch has been known to step outside the theater and drum up trade among the kids on the street."I see 50 kids playing basketball who live across from the theater and have never been there. I tell them, 'Yo, there's this kid across the street, he's [bleeping] hysterical, you should see it before it goes to HBO.' "It's not that theaters have trouble filling seats for this 27-year-old solo performer, whose newest show, "Jails, Hospitals & Hip Hop," begins a three-day engagement at Center Stage's Off Center Festival tomorrow.
NEWS
By Joe Garofoli and Joe Garofoli,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 1997
Richard Linklater laughs at the juxtaposition. The writer/director of "Slacker," the movie that inspired the pop-culture term, is dining at San Francisco's posh Ritz-Carlton hotel. You can easily pick out the erstwhile slacker in the sea of dark suits and white hair; he's the one in the thermal pullover and jeans.This isn't a case of Slacker Goes Nob Hill. It's just Hollywood custom that Castle Rock Entertainment would house the director of its new film, "subUrbia," in swank digs. Yet six years after "Slacker" introduced Linklater to the world, the 35-year-old remains anti-Hollywood.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 6, 1996
Robin Miller, former Baltimore cabbie and sedan service entrepreneur, is back on the road with a "full-tilt white Lincoln stretch," trading as "Robin's Limousine," based in Westminster. He got on the car phone the other day from Crystal City, Va., to offer an explanation for the appearance of all those Grey Poupon jars on limousine dashboards."That's a prom kid thing," Miller snarls. "Every prom kid, after the prom and the dinner that follows, has a need -- a crying need, a burning need -- to ride around Fells Point or downtown, yelling 'Whoo!
NEWS
By Hap Erstein and Hap Erstein,COX NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 1995
Eric Bogosian makes his living being angry. And on the theatrical Richter scale, his newest show is off the charts."This show rants," he says of "Wake Up and Smell the Coffee," the 90-minute, stand-up-comic hectoring he will bring to Center Stage Friday and Saturday.How angry is it? Mr. Bogosian explains, sort of. "When bikers hang around with bikers, they're just having a good time. But if you hung around with bikers, they'd probably scare you."And that's what I'm doing," he says. "It's biker theater.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | January 22, 1995
Has Eric Bogosian been domesticated? Become kinder and gentler?L The idea seems as incongruous as a sheep in wolf's clothing.Yet that's the claim made by this intense, even abrasive %J performer, who's best known for the take-no-prisoners approach his one-man shows."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 6, 1996
Robin Miller, former Baltimore cabbie and sedan service entrepreneur, is back on the road with a "full-tilt white Lincoln stretch," trading as "Robin's Limousine," based in Westminster. He got on the car phone the other day from Crystal City, Va., to offer an explanation for the appearance of all those Grey Poupon jars on limousine dashboards."That's a prom kid thing," Miller snarls. "Every prom kid, after the prom and the dinner that follows, has a need -- a crying need, a burning need -- to ride around Fells Point or downtown, yelling 'Whoo!
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 16, 1999
Last chance for 'Griller' This is the last weekend to catch the East Coast premiere of Eric Bogosian's "Griller" at Center Stage. A look at family, morality and society in 1990s suburbia, "Griller" debuted at Chicago's Goodman Theatre two seasons ago. Since then, Bogosian -- who does not appear in the play -- has made major revisions, many of them while in residence at Center Stage. Having the author on site has been a coup for Center Stage, although the script still needs considerable work.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 17, 1991
Eric Bogosian can be a street bum, a TV evangelist, a drug-wasted punk or a motor-mouth DJ. His characters spew venom and foul language; they reek of self-absorption, hypocrisy and addictions of every conceivable variety.Even the more upwardly mobile types who populate "Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll" -- the anthology of monologues he'll be performing Saturday and next Sunday at the Baltimore Museum of Art -- resemble something you'd scrape off the bottom of your shoe.Yet the 37-year-old Mr. Bogosian (pronounced bo-GO-shun)
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