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Erectile Dysfunction

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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 30, 2012
Men now have a new option to treat erectile dysfunction. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the new drug Stendra to treat the illness that causes problems in the sex lives of 30 million men. It is the first erectile dysfunction drug in a decade. And its reacts faster than other drugs on the market meaning men may be able to add spontaneity back into the bedroom. Men take the drug, which increases blood flow to the penis, as needed 30 minutes before engaging in sex. They'll still have to take some precautions like when taking other drugs on the market.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 30, 2012
Men now have a new option to treat erectile dysfunction. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the new drug Stendra to treat the illness that causes problems in the sex lives of 30 million men. It is the first erectile dysfunction drug in a decade. And its reacts faster than other drugs on the market meaning men may be able to add spontaneity back into the bedroom. Men take the drug, which increases blood flow to the penis, as needed 30 minutes before engaging in sex. They'll still have to take some precautions like when taking other drugs on the market.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2004
At a time when millions of men rely on Viagra and other anti-impotence drugs to restore sexual function, researchers have found a less expensive, all-natural way for many of them to spice up their love lives: lose weight. In a study of obese men who suffered from erectile dysfunction, doctors in Italy found that nearly a third regained their sexual ability after making lifestyle changes that included regular exercise and weight loss. While physicians can treat erectile dysfunction - with medication, psychotherapy or, in some cases, surgery - this is the first indication that the condition might be reversible.
NEWS
June 29, 2009
Erectile dysfunction, also known as ED, refers to the inability of the man to obtain and maintain erection of the penis sufficient to permit satisfactory sexual intercourse. About 18 million American men experience erectile dysfunction. Dr. Arthur L. Burnett II, medical director of the Johns Hopkins James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute's Male Consultation Clinic and professor of urology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, discusses causes, effects and treatment of the condition.
NEWS
June 29, 2009
Erectile dysfunction, also known as ED, refers to the inability of the man to obtain and maintain erection of the penis sufficient to permit satisfactory sexual intercourse. About 18 million American men experience erectile dysfunction. Dr. Arthur L. Burnett II, medical director of the Johns Hopkins James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute's Male Consultation Clinic and professor of urology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, discusses causes, effects and treatment of the condition.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 2005
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Under pressure from the Bush administration, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger ordered state health officials yesterday to not provide Viagra and other erectile dysfunction drugs to convicted sex offenders. Schwarzenegger said he issued the emergency order "to protect all Californians" until permanent regulations can be written to "target the sex offenders who pose a threat to innocent citizens with these drugs." About 63,000 registered sex offenders live in California.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | February 29, 2004
I just heard on the news that large doses of vitamins C and E have been shown to help stave off Alzheimer's in older people. Do you know anything about this? And if it's true, what constitutes a large dose? Apparently it is more than what is supplied in a regular daily multivitamin. Scientists studied nearly 5,000 older people in Cache County, Utah, and determined that those who took extra vitamin C and E were much less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease (Archives of Neurology, January 2004)
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
Baltimore ranks No.4 among the nation's most unhealthy cities for men, according to Men's Health magazine. Among the factors in the ranking were the city's high rates of sexually transmitted diseases (No. 1 in the nation) and erectile dysfunction (No. 2). Boston was rated the healthiest city for men. To figure a city's score, the magazine used an average of health, environment and fitness scores based on 28 relevant statistics. Memphis and Nashville were moved out of the bottom five because they lacked a score for fitness.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESSA GRAEDON | December 1, 2008
Is there any way to get rid of warts other than duct tape? I have more than 20 of these ugly things on my hands, and I can't imagine trying to get on with daily life with that much duct tape on. I have had these warts frozen off, burnt off and surgically removed, but they still grow back. I am desperate, but I must say the duct tape really does not appeal to me. There are many home remedies for warts besides duct tape. We will skip some of the stranger ones. That still leaves taping a piece of banana peel to the wart, with the inside of the peel against the skin.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 3, 2004
IT WASN'T JUST Janet Jackson's breast that had its protective covering stripped away this weekend. The American marriage is, kind of, out there, too. What rattled me more than the thought of those 10-year-olds in the television audience witnessing Justin Timberlake's rip job was the corporate thinking behind the new male impotency pill, Cialis, which made its advertising debut during the Super Bowl. Cialis is the latest entry in the erectile dysfunction drug wars. But instead of using a sports stud as a spokesman, like football's Mike Ditka for Levitra and baseball's Rafael Palmeiro for Viagra (Bob Dole was sooooooo not the right guy for that job)
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESSA GRAEDON | December 1, 2008
Is there any way to get rid of warts other than duct tape? I have more than 20 of these ugly things on my hands, and I can't imagine trying to get on with daily life with that much duct tape on. I have had these warts frozen off, burnt off and surgically removed, but they still grow back. I am desperate, but I must say the duct tape really does not appeal to me. There are many home remedies for warts besides duct tape. We will skip some of the stranger ones. That still leaves taping a piece of banana peel to the wart, with the inside of the peel against the skin.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | August 21, 2008
In 2001, I had a very strong urge to chew on ice. After reading in your column that this could be a sign of anemia, I told my doctor about it. The blood work showed anemia, and I was advised to get a colonoscopy. This test showed cancer in the colon. I had surgery and received six months of chemo. The operation removed 10 inches of my colon. Testing the lymph nodes showed that the cancer had spread to three out of 15 tested. I wouldn't have mentioned the craving for ice cubes had I not read about it in your column.
NEWS
July 4, 2007
After an Air Force base in Maryland stopped ordering Viagra in 2005, Lawrence Williams spotted an opportunity. The former civilian employee at Andrews Air Force Base continued to order the drug used for erectile dysfunction on behalf of the military and resold the pills for personal profit. In Greenbelt, U.S. District Judge Deborah K. Chasanow on Monday sentenced Williams, 48, of District Heights, to six months in prison, followed by five months of electronic home monitoring and three years of supervised release for stealing at least 100 bottles of Viagra from the military.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 18, 2005
BOSTON - You have to say that the drug companies asked for it. I mean really asked for it. Remember when Viagra first came on the market? The spokesman was Bob Dole, veteran, Senate leader and prostate cancer survivor, who urged other men to talk to their doctors about erectile dysfunction. The slogan was: Courage. Fast-forward through the millennium. The spokesman now is a hunky 40-something guy and a slogan that says: "Keep that spark alive." The message today is less about disease and more about delight.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 2005
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Under pressure from the Bush administration, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger ordered state health officials yesterday to not provide Viagra and other erectile dysfunction drugs to convicted sex offenders. Schwarzenegger said he issued the emergency order "to protect all Californians" until permanent regulations can be written to "target the sex offenders who pose a threat to innocent citizens with these drugs." About 63,000 registered sex offenders live in California.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2004
At a time when millions of men rely on Viagra and other anti-impotence drugs to restore sexual function, researchers have found a less expensive, all-natural way for many of them to spice up their love lives: lose weight. In a study of obese men who suffered from erectile dysfunction, doctors in Italy found that nearly a third regained their sexual ability after making lifestyle changes that included regular exercise and weight loss. While physicians can treat erectile dysfunction - with medication, psychotherapy or, in some cases, surgery - this is the first indication that the condition might be reversible.
NEWS
By Ira R. Allen | September 8, 2000
WASHINGTON -- As the public affairs director of a nonprofit health institution, I spend much of my time reading news stories about medical advances. But I must say to my friends in the news media and my colleagues in public relations that if I see or hear the phrase "silent epidemic" one more time, I am just going to (deleted). What is a "silent epidemic"? Is it an outbreak of bone disease or upsurge (or downturn) of erectile dysfunction? What is not a "silent epidemic" -- thousands of people writhing and screaming from bubonic plague, or, perhaps, the pain of something as frequent and joyful as childbirth?
NEWS
July 4, 2007
After an Air Force base in Maryland stopped ordering Viagra in 2005, Lawrence Williams spotted an opportunity. The former civilian employee at Andrews Air Force Base continued to order the drug used for erectile dysfunction on behalf of the military and resold the pills for personal profit. In Greenbelt, U.S. District Judge Deborah K. Chasanow on Monday sentenced Williams, 48, of District Heights, to six months in prison, followed by five months of electronic home monitoring and three years of supervised release for stealing at least 100 bottles of Viagra from the military.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | February 29, 2004
I just heard on the news that large doses of vitamins C and E have been shown to help stave off Alzheimer's in older people. Do you know anything about this? And if it's true, what constitutes a large dose? Apparently it is more than what is supplied in a regular daily multivitamin. Scientists studied nearly 5,000 older people in Cache County, Utah, and determined that those who took extra vitamin C and E were much less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease (Archives of Neurology, January 2004)
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 3, 2004
IT WASN'T JUST Janet Jackson's breast that had its protective covering stripped away this weekend. The American marriage is, kind of, out there, too. What rattled me more than the thought of those 10-year-olds in the television audience witnessing Justin Timberlake's rip job was the corporate thinking behind the new male impotency pill, Cialis, which made its advertising debut during the Super Bowl. Cialis is the latest entry in the erectile dysfunction drug wars. But instead of using a sports stud as a spokesman, like football's Mike Ditka for Levitra and baseball's Rafael Palmeiro for Viagra (Bob Dole was sooooooo not the right guy for that job)
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