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NEWS
January 19, 2007
On January 14, 2007, ERA ANNIE TUNKINS. On Friday, Mrs. Tunkins will lie in state at New Shiloh Baptist Church, 2100 N. Monroe Street, where the family will receive friends from 10 to 11 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 233-2400.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
So here's the good news for Orioles fans: The club heads into its six-game homestand against the Toronto Blue Jays and Tampa Bay Rays having won three of the past four games and doing so without their Gold Glove left side of the infield, Manny Machado and J.J. Hardy. It wasn't long ago when it seemed like the Orioles were facing must-win situations in April. But after opening the season losing five of six, they head into the weekend 4-5. The bottom of the lineup is starting to produce, manager Buck Showalter has again mastered the art of using his bullpen, closer Tommy Hunter is 3-for-3 with save opportunities and the offense has shown its potential for the big inning over the past two games.
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SPORTS
By Tom Reed and Northeast Ohio Media Group | September 14, 2013
BEREA, Ohio - Much was made of the Browns' decision to draft a 28-year-old quarterback a season ago. But if Brandon Weeden fails to produce this fall, his age likely becomes inconsequential to Cleveland fans. “If Brandon doesn't do it this year, we're going to be starting over again at quarterback,” former Browns coach Sam Rutigliano said. Not long ago, few could imagine giving up on a first-round quarterback after just two seasons. Nowadays, few would refute Rutligliano's assessment.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
NEW YORK - R ight-hander Ubaldo Jimenez can't pinpoint why April has typically been his most difficult month of the season, but he knows he can rebound from a pair of rocky starts to open his Orioles career because he's done it before. After the Orioles' 4-2 loss to the New York Yankees on Monday, Jimenez has lost both of his first two starts, pitched to a 6.75 ERA and allowed 21 base runners -- including eight walks -- over 10 2/3 innings. Over his career, Jimenez has a 10-10 record with a 5.02 ERA in April and is 72-67 with a 3.86 ERA after that.
NEWS
By George F. Will | March 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- "Poets," noted G.K. Chesterton, "have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese." His point was that this was not mysterious: Cheese is not the sort of subject that summons poetic thoughts.Presidents have hitherto been mysteriously silent about child-safety seats. However, last Saturday President Clinton's radio address concerned an improved fastening mechanism for such seats in automobiles. This was the third time this president has used a Saturday address to talk about child-safety seats.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Equal Rights Amendment lingers on, its pulse faint but its supporters determined. Their slender hopes arise from recent disrespect for the amending process.First introduced in Congress in 1923, the ERA says: "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex."In 1971, the year before Title IX prohibited sexual discrimination in education, the Supreme Court for the first time cited the Equal Protection clause of the 14th Amendment to invalidate a law on the grounds that it involved discrimination on the basis of sex.Despite this evidence that the ERA might be a legal redundancy (ERA supporters said it was needed to "put women into the Constitution")
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 15, 2000
BOSTON -- And you thought the Equal Rights Amendment was dead. We all did. The amendment flat-lined in 1982, just three states short of the 38 needed for ratification. I even wrote an obit. Back then, feminists shifted their sights to politics, saying if we can't change the state legislators' minds, we'll change their faces. A baby girl born in 1982 will cast her first vote in 2000 without being equal under the law. But what's this I hear out of Missouri? Can it be the faint sound of a pulse?
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman | January 15, 1993
Who were those guys?Allen Plaster and Bobby Chouinard didn't exactly make names for themselves in the Orioles' farm system, and now they're gone to the Oakland Athletics for Harold Baines.The A's apparently decided to go for future rather thaimmediate help when they accepted right-handers Chouinard and Plaster for the veteran left-handed slugger.Both had losing records but impressive numbers while pitchinin Single-A last year. Both were repeat performers at that classification, with 85-mph fastballs.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1994
A historic era -- often stormy, occasionally tumultuous, frequently productive -- ended at midnight Monday and next to no one rose to the occasion.The best that could be said for the lifeless ceremony marking the final leave-taking between Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the General Assembly was that nobody faked it, at least not much.After eight years, barring a special session, the legislature and the governor have seen the last of each other. Mr. Schaefer cannot succeed himself.The ceremonial highlights of the informal joint session after adjournment included short speeches by the governor, House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr.All three made game but lame efforts to capture the moment.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | October 31, 1992
Prodded by signs of hope from Iowa to California, the campaign for a national Equal Rights Amendment is stirring from a decade of slumber, and the right combination of Election Day victories could set off a new 10-year push for ratification.The hopeful signs include a likely win for a state ERA referendum in once-resistant Iowa, a surge in female candidacies at all levels ofgovernment, and the prospect that a Democrat sympathetic to the ERA will win the presidency.But the most intriguing indicator may be signs of ideological retreat among the ERA's staunchest opponents on the Christian Right.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Workers at a construction site near houses at Fort Meade found a World War II-era unexploded ordnance buried underground, prompting a temporary evacuation of some homes. Fort Meade spokeswoman Mary Doyle said the 1940s mortar round was about one foot long and "looks like a tiny torpedo. " The device, which was determined to be non-lethal, was disposed of and residents were allowed to return to their homes a couple hours after it was found at around noon Thursday. Doyle said it is not unusual to find unexploded ordnances around Fort Meade, and that typically, a 300-meter area is cordoned off, as was the case with the Heritage Park neighborhood at Fort Meade.
NEWS
Dr. Martin Wasserman | March 27, 2014
Staffers passing by a room in the U.S. House of Representatives office building earlier this month did double takes. Whom they saw inside were no ordinary Capitol Hill briefing attendees: rats, mice, guinea pigs and rabbits. The presence of these animals in the halls of Congress evidences a paradigm shift that could forever change how we protect public health in America. It's one of many developments this month that signal progress toward a safer future. Congressman James Moran (D-Va.)
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
As the fourth and final brother to play for the Gilman lacrosse team, senior midfielder William McBride has received plenty of advice from his older siblings. The best? "Just to live in the moment," he said. "They all said that high school was definitely the best time of your life, so enjoy yourself and have fun with it. " In his third season on varsity and coming off a 21-goal, eight-assist junior season, McBride plans to do just that, and nothing would be better than closing out his career with a Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference championship.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - Orioles manager Buck Showalter thinks it's unfair to dismiss Wei-Yin Chen's 2013 season as a disappointment. After all, the Taiwanese left-hander posted a 4.07 ERA, just a tick above the 4.02 mark from his rookie year in which he was considered one of the most pleasant surprises in baseball. There is a sense within the game, however, that Chen took a step backward last year because he missed two months in the summer with an oblique strain and struggled at the end of the season - possibly because he was dealing with knee discomfort.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Fort Meade officials evacuated a residential section of the base Tuesday afternoon after utility workers discovered unexploded ordnance. The device was found to be an inert mortar training round from World War II, a base spokeswoman said, and residents were allowed to return to their homes. The utility workers discovered the round in the Potomac Place neighborhood while performing scheduled maintenance, spokeswoman Mary Doyle said. Emergency workers cordoned off a 300-meter area and rerouted traffic around Reece Road.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
Fred Rasmussen 's reflections on the late Dr. Elmer Hoffman quite clearly characterized the very distinguished career and the many accomplishments of the Baltimore surgical icon ( "Dr. Elmer Hoffman, breast cancer surgeon," Jan. 22). However, it is with sweet sadness that we note that Dr. Hoffman's passing marks the end of a generation of general surgeons who practiced in our communities. These were the clinicians who "did it all" before the shift to super specialists and sub-specialists.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman | September 6, 1991
It doesn't look like a good year for Babe Ruth. Baseball commissioner Fay Vincent has erased his name from the record book by purging the asterisk next to the name of Roger Maris.And any day (week, month, year?) now, The Babe's hometown, for the second time, is expected to snub a campaign to name a stadium after its legendary baseball hero. A lot of people forget, but there was a strong effort to name Memorial Stadium after Ruth, but with the memory of the Korean conflict and World War II so vivid there was even less chance then than now.By all accounts, The Bambino was baseball's greatest player -- and most likely its most flamboyant personality.
SPORTS
July 8, 2007
If you weren't sure before last week, then you ought to be sure now: NFL history can now be divided into two eras -- B.G. and A.G. Before Goodell and After Goodell. Before Goodell, a player could be charged with having enough guns in his house to supply an island rebellion, and he would still be allowed to play. In the Super Bowl, no less. After Goodell, that same player could be charged with driving a little too fast after consuming alcohol within legal limits and get kicked off his team almost before he finishes posting bail.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
Trattoria Alberto , whose unlikely location in a Glen Burnie shopping center made it a dining discovery for almost 30 years, has closed. The Italian restaurant's last night was Dec. 31. "I have retired," owner Alberto Contestabile said. "I am going to relax a little bit. " Contestabile said he has sold the business to Arturo Ottaviano, the owner and chef of Osteria 177 in Annapolis. Ottaviano, who used to work for Contestabile, said that he will reopen the restaurant as Trattoria Arturo . Ottaviano said his restaurant will continue in the northern Italian vein of its predecessor but offer more lower-priced and contemporary options.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Living in the shadow of the Naval Academy chapel, Ellis Richman and his wife, Dr. Ingrid Kohlstadt, are exactly where they want to be - nestled in the heart of historic Annapolis. Theirs is no ordinary house among a bevy of notable properties. Woven into the rich tapestry of Colonial architecture that marks Maryland's capital city landscape are the grande dames of Queen Anne-style homes erected in the Victorian era. The couple owns one of a twin pair of homes built in the early 1890s by lumber and hardware merchant Joseph S.M. Basil.
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