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NEWS
January 19, 2007
On January 14, 2007, ERA ANNIE TUNKINS. On Friday, Mrs. Tunkins will lie in state at New Shiloh Baptist Church, 2100 N. Monroe Street, where the family will receive friends from 10 to 11 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 233-2400.
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NEWS
August 26, 2014
Tonight, Baltimore becomes a casino town. With the opening of the $442 million Horseshoe Casino Baltimore on Russell Street, the city enters an era of legalized slots, table games and poker that seemed impossible just a dozen years ago. Back then, people were busy drawing lines - first no slots at racetracks; then maybe, but no table games; then state-regulated slots at five locations and then six, along with everything else. Voters got their say, both on the matter of expanded gambling and then the location of the state's largest casino, Maryland Live, at Arundel Mills.
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SPORTS
By Tom Reed and Northeast Ohio Media Group | September 14, 2013
BEREA, Ohio - Much was made of the Browns' decision to draft a 28-year-old quarterback a season ago. But if Brandon Weeden fails to produce this fall, his age likely becomes inconsequential to Cleveland fans. “If Brandon doesn't do it this year, we're going to be starting over again at quarterback,” former Browns coach Sam Rutigliano said. Not long ago, few could imagine giving up on a first-round quarterback after just two seasons. Nowadays, few would refute Rutligliano's assessment.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Tucked inside the files at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston are State Department notes from the 1960s detailing racial discrimination along U.S. 40 in Maryland - and warning the president of its implications for the Cold War. One account describes the experience of an African diplomat who couldn't find a restaurant to serve a glass of water for his son as the boy struggled to catch his breath during an asthma attack. Another tells of a diplomat who drove 10 bleary-eyed hours along the highway - then the main thoroughfare between New York and Washington - because motels in Maryland wouldn't rent him a room for the night.
NEWS
By George F. Will | March 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- "Poets," noted G.K. Chesterton, "have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese." His point was that this was not mysterious: Cheese is not the sort of subject that summons poetic thoughts.Presidents have hitherto been mysteriously silent about child-safety seats. However, last Saturday President Clinton's radio address concerned an improved fastening mechanism for such seats in automobiles. This was the third time this president has used a Saturday address to talk about child-safety seats.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Equal Rights Amendment lingers on, its pulse faint but its supporters determined. Their slender hopes arise from recent disrespect for the amending process.First introduced in Congress in 1923, the ERA says: "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex."In 1971, the year before Title IX prohibited sexual discrimination in education, the Supreme Court for the first time cited the Equal Protection clause of the 14th Amendment to invalidate a law on the grounds that it involved discrimination on the basis of sex.Despite this evidence that the ERA might be a legal redundancy (ERA supporters said it was needed to "put women into the Constitution")
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 15, 2000
BOSTON -- And you thought the Equal Rights Amendment was dead. We all did. The amendment flat-lined in 1982, just three states short of the 38 needed for ratification. I even wrote an obit. Back then, feminists shifted their sights to politics, saying if we can't change the state legislators' minds, we'll change their faces. A baby girl born in 1982 will cast her first vote in 2000 without being equal under the law. But what's this I hear out of Missouri? Can it be the faint sound of a pulse?
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman | January 15, 1993
Who were those guys?Allen Plaster and Bobby Chouinard didn't exactly make names for themselves in the Orioles' farm system, and now they're gone to the Oakland Athletics for Harold Baines.The A's apparently decided to go for future rather thaimmediate help when they accepted right-handers Chouinard and Plaster for the veteran left-handed slugger.Both had losing records but impressive numbers while pitchinin Single-A last year. Both were repeat performers at that classification, with 85-mph fastballs.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1994
A historic era -- often stormy, occasionally tumultuous, frequently productive -- ended at midnight Monday and next to no one rose to the occasion.The best that could be said for the lifeless ceremony marking the final leave-taking between Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the General Assembly was that nobody faked it, at least not much.After eight years, barring a special session, the legislature and the governor have seen the last of each other. Mr. Schaefer cannot succeed himself.The ceremonial highlights of the informal joint session after adjournment included short speeches by the governor, House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr.All three made game but lame efforts to capture the moment.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | October 31, 1992
Prodded by signs of hope from Iowa to California, the campaign for a national Equal Rights Amendment is stirring from a decade of slumber, and the right combination of Election Day victories could set off a new 10-year push for ratification.The hopeful signs include a likely win for a state ERA referendum in once-resistant Iowa, a surge in female candidacies at all levels ofgovernment, and the prospect that a Democrat sympathetic to the ERA will win the presidency.But the most intriguing indicator may be signs of ideological retreat among the ERA's staunchest opponents on the Christian Right.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Orioles starter Chris Tillman dominated the Seattle Mariners lineup again Sunday, but he wants everyone to know that it's nothing personal. Of course, Tillman came over to the Orioles in the 2008 trade with the Mariners that also brought All-Star center fielder Adam Jones and three others for left-hander Erik Bedard - a move that is widely credited for being the watershed moment in the club's return to prominence after 14 consecutive losing seasons....
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Baseball's All-Star Game meant a great deal to me when I was a young fan. So it saddens me to see what an embattled institution it's become. The numbers are undeniable. As SI.com's Richard Deitsch noted Monday , last year's television audience of 11 million was down 61 percent from the 28 million who watched in 1985. That's a meaningful comparison for me, because 1985 lay right in the heart of my romance with the midsummer classic. I was 9 years old and obsessed with the sport.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
Chris Tillman may not have 11 wins like he did at the midway point last season, but his numbers have been far from disappointing. Including Saturday's loss to the New York Yankees, the Orioles right-hander is 7-5 with a 4.11 ERA going into the All-Star break. Last year, when he was invited to the All-Star Game, his ERA was only a few ticks lower, at 3.95. “I think it bodes well, hopefully for the rest of the season, because he seems to be getting more consistent mechanically as we go,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
What remarkable lives they led. The five men, who hailed mostly from the pinnacle of French aristocracy, were liberals who threw off their own privileges to build a more equitable society. Individually, they danced with Marie Antoinette, fled the guillotine, spied for their country and played a role in a slave revolt in Haiti. All five relocated to Philadelphia, and in just a handful of years managed to exert a lasting impact on the fledgling United States of America. Francois Furstenberg, an associate professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University, follows the exiles on their American adventures in his new book, "When the United States Spoke French.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Ollie M.J. Ray, whose career teaching in city public schools spanned nearly four decades, died Tuesday of heart failure at Northwest Hospital. She was 82. "They say teachers are born, and Ollie had not only the native ability to be a teacher but also the desire," said Hayyte Jackson, who was a college friend and later a colleague in Baltimore public schools. "She had a great love for children and young people, and wanted to see them receive their appropriate secular and Christian education," said Mrs. Jackson, who retired in 1993 from Windsor Hills Elementary School, where she had been principal.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
This was the promise: No longer would African-Americans be forced to pick up their meals from the back door of restaurants. No longer would they need to fear being unable to find lodgings on their way home from a trip. And no longer would those who denied them a seat in a theater or on a merry-go-round be able to cloak their prejudice with the law. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act on July 2, 1964, the culmination of decades of struggle for racial equality.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman | September 6, 1991
It doesn't look like a good year for Babe Ruth. Baseball commissioner Fay Vincent has erased his name from the record book by purging the asterisk next to the name of Roger Maris.And any day (week, month, year?) now, The Babe's hometown, for the second time, is expected to snub a campaign to name a stadium after its legendary baseball hero. A lot of people forget, but there was a strong effort to name Memorial Stadium after Ruth, but with the memory of the Korean conflict and World War II so vivid there was even less chance then than now.By all accounts, The Bambino was baseball's greatest player -- and most likely its most flamboyant personality.
SPORTS
July 8, 2007
If you weren't sure before last week, then you ought to be sure now: NFL history can now be divided into two eras -- B.G. and A.G. Before Goodell and After Goodell. Before Goodell, a player could be charged with having enough guns in his house to supply an island rebellion, and he would still be allowed to play. In the Super Bowl, no less. After Goodell, that same player could be charged with driving a little too fast after consuming alcohol within legal limits and get kicked off his team almost before he finishes posting bail.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings will host a top Republican from the House Oversight Committee in Baltimore today, but it won't be the committee's chairman, Rep. Darrell Issa. Calling for a "new era of bipartisanship," Cummings will tour Rep. Jason Chaffetz of Utah around the city, including for a meeting at the Center for Urban Families and the Sandtown Winchester Senior Center. Cummings, the top-ranking Democrat on the contentious committee, has had a famously rocky relationship with its chairman, Issa.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | May 19, 2014
Talk about generation gap. During a Saturday commemoration speech at Morgan State University's commencement, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder lauded Morgan State's band and choir, which  moments earlier had rendered a crowd pleasing performance. Then the 63-year-old Holder turned to the band and asked, “Do you all know Flash Light?” referring to the 1978 hit song by funk troupe Parliament. The song peaked at Number One on the Billboard R&B charts and helped popularize the group's brand of music that became known as P-Funk.
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