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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 22, 1999
Peter Shaffer's "Equus" opens at Olney Theatre Center tomorrow. The 1975 Tony Award-winning drama focuses on a stable boy who blinds six horses and the psychiatrist who examines him.The play shares Olney's spring slot with David Rabe's "A Question of Mercy," which begins performances June 1. Linked by the theme of man's relationship to science, the productions share the same director (Jim Petosa), designers and cast. The set for both, designed by James Kronzer, is intended to represent an abstract laboratory and includes an upper gallery of 18 seats, open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis for $10.Show times for "Equus" at Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney, are 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Sundays, with matinees at 2 p.m. Sundays and some Thursdays and Saturdays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
It looks like a full-fledged trend -- Baltimore theater companies adding performances of productions thanks to popular demand this winter. First to announce was Everyman Theatre, which  extended the run of "August: Osage County. "  Two more companies have likewise found themselves with hits. Katori Hall's "The Mountaintop" isn't for everybody, but this serious/humorous/surreal look at Rev. Martin Luther King's last night, April 3, 1968, has turned out to be "one of the highest grossing plays" in the 50-year history of Center Stage, the company reports.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
It looks like a full-fledged trend -- Baltimore theater companies adding performances of productions thanks to popular demand this winter. First to announce was Everyman Theatre, which  extended the run of "August: Osage County. "  Two more companies have likewise found themselves with hits. Katori Hall's "The Mountaintop" isn't for everybody, but this serious/humorous/surreal look at Rev. Martin Luther King's last night, April 3, 1968, has turned out to be "one of the highest grossing plays" in the 50-year history of Center Stage, the company reports.
FEATURES
February 28, 2007
"That iconic scene is the physical and emotion climax of the play ... if I do that with pants on, it would be (stupid)." Daniel Radcliffe, who bares all this week in his wet end stage debut in Peter Shaffer's "Equus."
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1990
An equestrian god dwelling in the dark recesses of a disturbed boy's mind forms the framework for Peter Shaffer's powerful play, "Equus," being presented by students of Goucher College's Open Circle Theatre.Suggested by a real life incident, Shaffer's work opened in New York in 1975 to critical acclaim and earned a Tony and other major awards. Surrealistic in nature it is a dangerous and philosophical journey into the mysteries of the psyche.Excellently directed by Michael Simon Curry, the play on one level is pure intellectual food for provocative thought as a psychiatrist pursues the "why" in the case of Alan, a 17-year-old boy who has cruelly blinded six horses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 20, 1999
Peter Shaffer's "Equus" is just about to prance away from the Olney Theatre Center, where director Jim Petosa's powerful production closes Sunday. Meanwhile, another production opens in Baltimore tomorrow at the Vagabond Players.Directed by Barry Feinstein, the Vagabonds' version stars Christopher D. Carver as the troubled adolescent who blinds six horses and Joseph Moore as the psychiatrist who treats him. Although Olney chose to feature only one horse on stage, the Vagabonds' production will include the full complement of horses called for in the script.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | November 20, 1991
Seventeen-year-old Alan Strang has hideously blinded six horses and no one knows why. An outraged community demands justice, but the judge commits the boy to a psychiatric hospital for treatment by Dr. Martin Dysart.Thus begins playwright Peter Shaffer's disturbing and controversial "Equus," on stage through Saturday at Western Maryland College.The play, two hours of chilling investigation into the psychologyof sexual and religious passion, is less concerned with what happened than with why.When "Equus" opened in New York in 1974, reviewers praised the work of Peter Firth in the role of the disturbed boy.What was true then is true now. Once more, this most unconventionaldrama is marked by a young actor's amazing performance.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
Interstate General Co. Limited Partnership yesterday completed a planned spin-off of its thoroughbred horse racing interests, part of a push by the St. Charles-based real estate developer to boost the market value of its assets.Equus Gaming Co. L.P.'s units -- shares of a publicly held partnership -- closed at $4.50 in trading on the Nasdaq market, off $1 from its opening price. The new company holds a majority interest in the partnership that controls the El Comandante race track in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and a related off-track betting system.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | September 26, 1991
An excellent production of Peter Shaffer's Tony Award winning drama, "Equus," is on stage at the Towsontowne Arena Theatre through Oct. 16.The company, under the fine direction of Robert Clingan, is performing in the arena space below the stage at the Towsontowne Dinner Theatre Mondays through Wednesdays when the dinner theater is dark. (The dinner theater presents musicals. Currently "Show Boat" is on stage Thursdays through Sundays)."Equus" is the story of a confused 17-year-old boy, Alan Strang, dwelling in a Freudian fantasy world where he is compelled to create his own god, an equestrian deity he calls Equus.
FEATURES
February 28, 2007
"That iconic scene is the physical and emotion climax of the play ... if I do that with pants on, it would be (stupid)." Daniel Radcliffe, who bares all this week in his wet end stage debut in Peter Shaffer's "Equus."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 20, 1999
Peter Shaffer's "Equus" is just about to prance away from the Olney Theatre Center, where director Jim Petosa's powerful production closes Sunday. Meanwhile, another production opens in Baltimore tomorrow at the Vagabond Players.Directed by Barry Feinstein, the Vagabonds' version stars Christopher D. Carver as the troubled adolescent who blinds six horses and Joseph Moore as the psychiatrist who treats him. Although Olney chose to feature only one horse on stage, the Vagabonds' production will include the full complement of horses called for in the script.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 28, 1999
Passion and normality are both desirable traits, but what happens when they come into conflict? Peter Shaffer examined that question in his 1973 drama, "Equus," which is receiving a powerful production at Olney Theatre Center. A 17-year-old stable boy has suddenly and inexplicably blinded six horses. Since then, the only words he has uttered are advertising jingles. The boy is sent to a psychiatric hospital instead of jail. But the child psychiatrist who takes the case has mixed feelings about treating him. Mitchell Hebert's thoughtful portrayal of doubt-ridden psychiatrist Martin Dysart and Scott Fortier's intense depiction of the troubled teen-ager, Alan Strang, turn the doctor-patient relationship into an emotionally charged one. From the moment Dysart breaks through Alan's defenses, the two develop a wary respect for each other, a respect that, for Dysart, turns into admiration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 22, 1999
Peter Shaffer's "Equus" opens at Olney Theatre Center tomorrow. The 1975 Tony Award-winning drama focuses on a stable boy who blinds six horses and the psychiatrist who examines him.The play shares Olney's spring slot with David Rabe's "A Question of Mercy," which begins performances June 1. Linked by the theme of man's relationship to science, the productions share the same director (Jim Petosa), designers and cast. The set for both, designed by James Kronzer, is intended to represent an abstract laboratory and includes an upper gallery of 18 seats, open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis for $10.Show times for "Equus" at Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney, are 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Sundays, with matinees at 2 p.m. Sundays and some Thursdays and Saturdays.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
Interstate General Co. Limited Partnership yesterday completed a planned spin-off of its thoroughbred horse racing interests, part of a push by the St. Charles-based real estate developer to boost the market value of its assets.Equus Gaming Co. L.P.'s units -- shares of a publicly held partnership -- closed at $4.50 in trading on the Nasdaq market, off $1 from its opening price. The new company holds a majority interest in the partnership that controls the El Comandante race track in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and a related off-track betting system.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | November 20, 1991
Seventeen-year-old Alan Strang has hideously blinded six horses and no one knows why. An outraged community demands justice, but the judge commits the boy to a psychiatric hospital for treatment by Dr. Martin Dysart.Thus begins playwright Peter Shaffer's disturbing and controversial "Equus," on stage through Saturday at Western Maryland College.The play, two hours of chilling investigation into the psychologyof sexual and religious passion, is less concerned with what happened than with why.When "Equus" opened in New York in 1974, reviewers praised the work of Peter Firth in the role of the disturbed boy.What was true then is true now. Once more, this most unconventionaldrama is marked by a young actor's amazing performance.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | September 26, 1991
An excellent production of Peter Shaffer's Tony Award winning drama, "Equus," is on stage at the Towsontowne Arena Theatre through Oct. 16.The company, under the fine direction of Robert Clingan, is performing in the arena space below the stage at the Towsontowne Dinner Theatre Mondays through Wednesdays when the dinner theater is dark. (The dinner theater presents musicals. Currently "Show Boat" is on stage Thursdays through Sundays)."Equus" is the story of a confused 17-year-old boy, Alan Strang, dwelling in a Freudian fantasy world where he is compelled to create his own god, an equestrian deity he calls Equus.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 28, 1999
Passion and normality are both desirable traits, but what happens when they come into conflict? Peter Shaffer examined that question in his 1973 drama, "Equus," which is receiving a powerful production at Olney Theatre Center. A 17-year-old stable boy has suddenly and inexplicably blinded six horses. Since then, the only words he has uttered are advertising jingles. The boy is sent to a psychiatric hospital instead of jail. But the child psychiatrist who takes the case has mixed feelings about treating him. Mitchell Hebert's thoughtful portrayal of doubt-ridden psychiatrist Martin Dysart and Scott Fortier's intense depiction of the troubled teen-ager, Alan Strang, turn the doctor-patient relationship into an emotionally charged one. From the moment Dysart breaks through Alan's defenses, the two develop a wary respect for each other, a respect that, for Dysart, turns into admiration.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | December 18, 2002
1999 Equus Syrah, Paso Robles ($18). The syrah grape is continuing to flourish in California as better vineyard sites are found and more wineries get the hang of this classic red-wine grape. This Central Coast syrah from Wild Horse Vineyards is one of the more Rhonelike examples on the market, with generous blackberry and raspberry fruit and hints of plums, herbes de Provence and mint. Appealingly plump now, it has the underlying structure to age for a decade. The length and intensity are impressive.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1990
An equestrian god dwelling in the dark recesses of a disturbed boy's mind forms the framework for Peter Shaffer's powerful play, "Equus," being presented by students of Goucher College's Open Circle Theatre.Suggested by a real life incident, Shaffer's work opened in New York in 1975 to critical acclaim and earned a Tony and other major awards. Surrealistic in nature it is a dangerous and philosophical journey into the mysteries of the psyche.Excellently directed by Michael Simon Curry, the play on one level is pure intellectual food for provocative thought as a psychiatrist pursues the "why" in the case of Alan, a 17-year-old boy who has cruelly blinded six horses.
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