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BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | November 5, 1991
Equitable Life Assurance Corp. will consolidate its downtown fTC Baltimore and Owings Mills offices and move into the USF&G Building downtown early next year, the company said."
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NEWS
By Todd Cherkis and Roxie Herbekian | February 6, 2014
People elsewhere in the nation are taking action to tackle the issue of the growing divide between the rich and poor, but here in Maryland, the richest state in the country, we have a seismic inequality problem and are doing little to address it. New York City's new mayor, Bill de Blasio, has vowed to take on the "inequality crisis" by expanding paid sick leave, increasing taxes on the wealthy and requiring big developers to build more affordable housing....
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1996
J. Wilbur Freyman, who rose from clerk to CEO and treasurer of the venerable Baltimore Equitable Society, died Oct. 23 of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. The Milford resident was 86.In 1928, he began his career with Baltimore Equitable, which was founded in 1794 and is the oldest corporation in Maryland and the nation's fourth-oldest insurer.Known as "the Society," the firm's distinctive metal fire mark -- two clasped hands over the date 1794 -- is displayed on the outsides of houses and businesses it insures and is a familiar sight to Marylanders.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
A developer plans to convert the historic Equitable Building into 180 residential apartments, the latest Baltimore development designed to capitalize on trends that predict increased urban living. JK Equities, a real estate company with offices in New York and Chicago, purchased the 10-12 N. Calvert St. property for $7.2 million last month from Equitable Holdings Trust. The company plans to invest $32 million to convert the nine stories of office space into apartments, spending roughly $178,000 per unit, said Leo McDermott, a real estate agent for Transwestern, which represented the seller on the deal.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | November 26, 1992
For many Baltimoreans, there is a minimystery in the plaques showing clasped hands and 1794 -- in gleaming gold leaf -- that adorn thousands of houses and other buildings in the area.Are they address markers? No. Do they indicate the building's age? No.They are "fire marks," relics of an earlier time. They show the building is insured by Maryland's oldest fire insurance company, the Baltimore Equitable Society, founded in 1794 by a group of local merchants.In the days before paid fire service, volunteer fire companies refused to put out blazes in uninsured buildings and fought over which unit would battle a particular fire.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | December 18, 1992
H. Grant Hathaway, who helped build Equitable Bancorporation into one of the city's most successful banking companies, said yesterday that he will retire this month as vice chairman of MNC Financial Inc., the company that boughtEquitable in 1989.Mr. Hathaway, 65, also will retire as chairman of MNC's largest subsidiary, Maryland National Bank. He will continue to serve as a director of MNC and American Security Bank, another unit of MNC, and as director and chairman emeritus of Maryland National Bank.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
In an age when fire protection can be bought over the Internet and billion-dollar insurance companies are merged and sold like commodities, Baltimore Equitable Insurance is a throwback to another era. Founded when George Washington was president, the 12-employee firm has shunned diversification and stuck to selling an obscure type of homeowners insurance offered by only a handful of large companies in the United States. It has rarely advertised, existing mostly on word of mouth. Agents still visit clients, taking pains to carefully measure homes and assess risks.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
For years, no one bothered with spring cleaning. Employees of Baltimore Equitable Insurance, a city fixture since 1794, just tucked what they didn't need into drawers and cabinets on the second floor, tied old policies with string and shoved them onto shelves in the basement. So when the venerable Eutaw Street institution decided to leave the building it has occupied for 114 years, no one knew just what might lurk in those nooks and crannies. Turns out, it is a trove of historic treasures, from never-before-seen 19th-century maps of Baltimore to an original drawing of City Hall believed to have been done in 1871 by the architect who designed it (and found in a plain cardboard tube cryptically labeled in black marker)
NEWS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | September 25, 1990
How can you describe a man who started out as a furniture salesman, made $370 million and won a spot in the Forbes 400, and still describes his early business career as "not a very exciting story"?You can start by calling Alfred Lerner chairman and chief executive officer of MNC Financial Inc., the parent of Maryland National Bank.Described as brilliant, shy and decisive, Mr. Lerner, 56, is still an unknown to many of the banking analysts and other outsiders who follow MNC but haven't yet met him.Even longtime friends and business associates don't have a clear idea what changes he is likely to bring to Maryland's largest banking company.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1994
The owners of Towson Marketplace turned the 541,000-square-foot shopping center over to their lenders yesterday, after talks aimed at redeveloping it instead of foreclosing it broke down.Bramalea Ltd., the Canadian real estate company that owned Towson Marketplace, agreed to give it back to the Equitable Life Assurance Society of America in exchange for forgiveness on the property's $17 million mortgage. The debt had grown to $19 million because of missed interest payments.Dane Hooks, senior operating officer for Bramalea's U.S. Properties Group, said an Equitable subsidiary will take over management of the center today.
NEWS
By Kevin Kamenetz | September 30, 2013
Several years ago, Baltimore County government realized that the runaway costs of employee health care and pension benefits needed to be reined in or our taxpayers would be stuck with a huge bill to pay. The county remains committed to providing quality health care to its employees and retirees, including family benefits with low deductibles. However, in order to control rising health care costs, the county decided that each employee should pay the same cost for health care as every other employee and retiree.
NEWS
March 24, 2012
A recent column written in part by the president of the Johns Hopkins University urged lawmakers to back a massive school renovation and repair program in Baltimore City ("New schools, new city," March 20). But given past history, it's fair to ask whether the kind of public-private partnerships cited in the commentary will truly benefit the most needy residents of the East Baltimore communities adjacent to this powerful institution. The schools in East Baltimore lead the city in low educational performance.
NEWS
December 14, 2007
Albert James Gardner Jr., a retired senior vice president of the old Equitable Trust Co., died of congestive heart failure Saturday at Howard County General Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 91. Born in Baltimore, he was a 1934 graduate of Forest Park High School. He studied at the Baltimore College of Commerce and the Johns Hopkins University and was a certified public accountant Before joining Equitable Trust Co. in 1960, he was the Gunther Brewing Co.'s assistant vice president.
NEWS
October 23, 2007
A group of Baltimore-area church leaders plan to press state and local officials Thursday night to ensure that the influx of jobs and people from military base realignment does not harm Maryland's environment or the region's working families. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon and several legislators are expected to attend the meeting of BRIDGE, a coalition of area congregations committed to improving social equity, said Gary Gillespie, a spokesman for the group. BRIDGE stands for Baltimore Regional Initiative Developing Genuine Equality.
NEWS
November 19, 2004
James Joseph Finch, a retired vice president of the old Equitable Trust Co. who honored the memory of his late wife with a visitors garden at a Towson hospital, died from stroke complications Monday at Deer's Head Center in Salisbury. The former longtime Towson resident was 78. Mr. Finch was born in Baltimore and raised near the Maryland Penitentiary. He attended Polytechnic Institute, and during World War II joined the Navy and was a carpenter's mate with the Seabees in the Philippines.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2004
A Houston commercial real estate company has sold its portfolio of eight downtown Baltimore office buildings, including Brown's Arcade on North Charles Street and the Equitable Building on North Calvert, for $29.5 million to developers and investors in Montgomery County. Boxer Property closed yesterday on the deal to sell the eight Class B buildings - typically older properties that lack modern amenities - which have a total 530,000 square feet of office space, said Andrew Segal, Boxer's president.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | October 2, 1992
A federal judge has approved a previously announced $8.8 million settlement in a class action lawsuit brought by shareholders of MNC Financial Inc. who alleged that the banking company misrepresented its true condition before financial problems came to light in the fall of 1990.U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz, at a hearing in federal court last Friday, approved the settlement agreement, which the parties had reached in April. The approval means the money will be put in an escrow account, and the plaintiffs' attorneys will distribute it to affected shareholders.
NEWS
March 2, 1998
C. William Hartge, 72, headed relocation firmC. William Hartge, a pioneer in the corporate relocation industry, died Thursday of pancreatic cancer at Riverside, his home in the Brinklow community of Montgomery County. He was 72.Retired since 1985, Mr. Hartge had been, for the six previous years, chief executive officer of Equitable Relocation Management Corp., an Equitable Life Assurance Society subsidiary that specializes in relocating executives.He joined Equitable's Baltimore office in 1949 and, in 1966, was one of several Equitable officials who launched an in-house relocation service for corporate executives.
NEWS
April 23, 2004
John Charles Ruxton, a retired banking official and World War II veteran, died of a heart attack Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Ruxton resident was 77. Mr. Ruxton was born in Springfield, Mo., and raised in Baltimore on Evesham Avenue. After graduating from City College in 1944, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and was en route to the Pacific when the war ended. He was discharged in 1946. He earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy from the Johns Hopkins University in 1949, and attended the University of Maryland Law School.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
For years, no one bothered with spring cleaning. Employees of Baltimore Equitable Insurance, a city fixture since 1794, just tucked what they didn't need into drawers and cabinets on the second floor, tied old policies with string and shoved them onto shelves in the basement. So when the venerable Eutaw Street institution decided to leave the building it has occupied for 114 years, no one knew just what might lurk in those nooks and crannies. Turns out, it is a trove of historic treasures, from never-before-seen 19th-century maps of Baltimore to an original drawing of City Hall believed to have been done in 1871 by the architect who designed it (and found in a plain cardboard tube cryptically labeled in black marker)
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