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March 17, 2007
Leroy R. Cofield, a retired heavy equipment operator and longtime West Baltimore resident, died March 9 of pancreatitis at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 70. Mr. Cofield was born and raised in Edgecombe County, Va., and later moved to East Baltimore. He served in the Air Force as a mechanic from 1955 to 1957. He spent the last 12 years of his career with the city Bureau of Water and Waste Water. He retired in 1998. Mr. Cofield enjoyed working on old automobiles and traveling. He was a member of Simmons Memorial Baptist Church, where services were held Thursday.
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NEWS
March 17, 2007
Leroy R. Cofield, a retired heavy equipment operator and longtime West Baltimore resident, died March 9 of pancreatitis at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 70. Mr. Cofield was born and raised in Edgecombe County, Va., and later moved to East Baltimore. He served in the Air Force as a mechanic from 1955 to 1957. He spent the last 12 years of his career with the city Bureau of Water and Waste Water. He retired in 1998. Mr. Cofield enjoyed working on old automobiles and traveling. He was a member of Simmons Memorial Baptist Church, where services were held Thursday.
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NEWS
June 18, 2005
Warren Ellsworth "Buddy" Lindemon Jr., a former equipment operator and laborer, died of a heart attack June 11 at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. He was 52 and lived in Edgemere. Mr. Lindemon was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Colgate neighborhood. He attended Kenwood High School and later earned his General Educational Development certificate. He served in the Army as a sharpshooter in the early 1970s. His decorations included the Sharpshooter Badge and National Defense Medal.
NEWS
June 18, 2005
Warren Ellsworth "Buddy" Lindemon Jr., a former equipment operator and laborer, died of a heart attack June 11 at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. He was 52 and lived in Edgemere. Mr. Lindemon was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Colgate neighborhood. He attended Kenwood High School and later earned his General Educational Development certificate. He served in the Army as a sharpshooter in the early 1970s. His decorations included the Sharpshooter Badge and National Defense Medal.
NEWS
September 3, 2004
Paul Barclay Mulloy, a heavy equipment operator and mechanic who enjoyed riding all-terrain vehicles on his Carroll County farm, died of cancer Aug. 27 at his Woodbine home. He was 52. Mr. Mulloy was born in Sheboygan, Wis., and raised in Simpsonville, Howard County, where he had moved with his family in the late 1950s. He was a 1970 graduate of Atholton High School. He was a long-distance truck driver and later owned a rig for several years before becoming a heavy equipment operator and mechanic for Lane Construction Co. in 1997.
NEWS
June 12, 2003
James and Senia Hagy, equipment operator, secretary Services for James Arthur Hagy and Senia Starlene Harry Hagy, a Centreville couple killed last week in a motorcycle accident, will be held at 11 a.m. today at Galena Funeral Home, 118 W. Cross St., Galena. Mr. Hagy, 45, and Mrs. Hagy, 44, were riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle when it collided with a pickup truck Friday at Routes 301 and 305 in Queen Anne's County. Mr. Hagy was pronounced dead at the scene, and his wife died after being flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
A strike by heavy-equipment operators in Baltimore ended yesterday after negotiators reached the outline of a compromise on the key issue: time-and-a-half pay for Saturday work.Under the terms of the tentative deal, the five companies being struck by Local 37 of the International Union of Operating Engineers will agree not to discriminate against workers who already have worked 40 hours in a week when there is Saturday work to be awarded. The companies will not, however, guarantee time-and-a-half pay for all Saturday work -- what the union wanted.
NEWS
By Paula Lavigne and Paula Lavigne,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
In a protest of working conditions they claim are hazardous and crimping their education, about 20 well-coiffed students went on strike yesterday at a downtown cosmetology school.Wearing white hairdresser uniforms, the students -- most nearly finished with the 1,500-hour training program -- stood outside the Baltimore Studio of Hair Design at 18 N. Howard St. as clients filed in to have their hair styled.The students' complaints include inadequate ventilation, moldy bathrooms, dangerous stairs and broken or malfunctioning equipment.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
Heavy-equipment operators went on strike yesterday at an estimated 50 to 60 construction sites in metropolitan Baltimore, as workers sought to retrieve the Saturday overtime that they gave up during the deep construction downturn of the early 1990s.The strike began after members of Local 37 of the International Union of Operating Engineers voted down a proposed contract Monday. The offer from five companies represented by the Maryland Heavy and Highway Contractors Association Inc. followed expiration of the union's contract March 31. "The market has recovered substantially, and members feel that portions of the conditions we gave them then we want back, and one of them is Saturday overtime," said Ron DeJuliis, business manager for the Hamilton-based local.
NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,THE DAILY PRESS | April 17, 2005
You're building a house or putting a major addition on your home, and you've asked the builder to preserve a big white oak that you like. That's a smart request, because good trees add monetary value and visual interest to property. "Trees break up the architecture of a home and soften the hardscape," says Andrew Koenig, an arborist with Bartlett Tree Experts in Yorktown, Va. The company has offices throughout the country (www.bartlett.com). "It's important to take care of them any time there's heavy construction equipment in your yard."
NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,THE DAILY PRESS | April 17, 2005
You're building a house or putting a major addition on your home, and you've asked the builder to preserve a big white oak that you like. That's a smart request, because good trees add monetary value and visual interest to property. "Trees break up the architecture of a home and soften the hardscape," says Andrew Koenig, an arborist with Bartlett Tree Experts in Yorktown, Va. The company has offices throughout the country (www.bartlett.com). "It's important to take care of them any time there's heavy construction equipment in your yard."
NEWS
September 3, 2004
Paul Barclay Mulloy, a heavy equipment operator and mechanic who enjoyed riding all-terrain vehicles on his Carroll County farm, died of cancer Aug. 27 at his Woodbine home. He was 52. Mr. Mulloy was born in Sheboygan, Wis., and raised in Simpsonville, Howard County, where he had moved with his family in the late 1950s. He was a 1970 graduate of Atholton High School. He was a long-distance truck driver and later owned a rig for several years before becoming a heavy equipment operator and mechanic for Lane Construction Co. in 1997.
NEWS
June 12, 2003
James and Senia Hagy, equipment operator, secretary Services for James Arthur Hagy and Senia Starlene Harry Hagy, a Centreville couple killed last week in a motorcycle accident, will be held at 11 a.m. today at Galena Funeral Home, 118 W. Cross St., Galena. Mr. Hagy, 45, and Mrs. Hagy, 44, were riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle when it collided with a pickup truck Friday at Routes 301 and 305 in Queen Anne's County. Mr. Hagy was pronounced dead at the scene, and his wife died after being flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Paula Lavigne and Paula Lavigne,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
In a protest of working conditions they claim are hazardous and crimping their education, about 20 well-coiffed students went on strike yesterday at a downtown cosmetology school.Wearing white hairdresser uniforms, the students -- most nearly finished with the 1,500-hour training program -- stood outside the Baltimore Studio of Hair Design at 18 N. Howard St. as clients filed in to have their hair styled.The students' complaints include inadequate ventilation, moldy bathrooms, dangerous stairs and broken or malfunctioning equipment.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
A strike by heavy-equipment operators in Baltimore ended yesterday after negotiators reached the outline of a compromise on the key issue: time-and-a-half pay for Saturday work.Under the terms of the tentative deal, the five companies being struck by Local 37 of the International Union of Operating Engineers will agree not to discriminate against workers who already have worked 40 hours in a week when there is Saturday work to be awarded. The companies will not, however, guarantee time-and-a-half pay for all Saturday work -- what the union wanted.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
Heavy-equipment operators went on strike yesterday at an estimated 50 to 60 construction sites in metropolitan Baltimore, as workers sought to retrieve the Saturday overtime that they gave up during the deep construction downturn of the early 1990s.The strike began after members of Local 37 of the International Union of Operating Engineers voted down a proposed contract Monday. The offer from five companies represented by the Maryland Heavy and Highway Contractors Association Inc. followed expiration of the union's contract March 31. "The market has recovered substantially, and members feel that portions of the conditions we gave them then we want back, and one of them is Saturday overtime," said Ron DeJuliis, business manager for the Hamilton-based local.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | July 28, 2007
Nearly 40 years ago, Jay Mazzone was the most famous batboy in the major leagues. As a 12-year-old, he joined the Orioles in that magical season of 1966 when they won their first World Series. He captured the attention of the national news media as he picked up bats and balls with metal hooks attached to his limbs. As a 2-year-old, he lost his hands after his snowsuit caught fire. "I met presidents Eisenhower, Johnson and Nixon," he said the other night from his Parkton home, where he lives with his wife, Bobbie.
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