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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
Summer 2012 will be officially in the books as of 10:49 a.m. Saturday, and it will end with one small taste of summer-like weather before the fall weather we have flirted with sets in further. It won't be as hot as it has been much of the summer, but Saturday is expected to be warmer and more humid than it has been lately. Highs are expected in the low 80s with a 60 percent chance of passing storms in the evening. There is a 15 percent chance that storms could be severe, according to the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
It has begun to feel like fall, with schools in session and a chill in the air, but the season actually arrives at the moment of autumnal equinox at 10:29 p.m. Monday. At that instant, Earth will be rotating upright on its axis, giving the northern and southern hemispheres equal sunlight and making the length of day and night roughly equal. In Baltimore, the sun will stay up for 12 hours or more until Friday. It's the tilt of the Earth's axis that gives us seasons -- at the winter solstice, the axis is tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun, and at the summer solstice, it's tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun. Meteorological fall started Sept.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 19, 2012
Earth reaches vernal equinox at 1:14 a.m. Tuesday, but the days have been growing longer than nights since Saturday. The equinox, which of course marks the start of spring, is the point at which the Earth's axis is neither tilted toward or away from the sun. In the northern hemisphere, though, daylight and nighttime hours become equal a few days before the equinox. Friday got closest to 12 hours of daylight even, with sunrise at 7:16 a.m. and sunset at 7:15 p.m. This morning, the sun appears at 7:09 a.m. and stays out until 7:19 p.m. Enjoy the 12-plus hours of sunshine today.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Earth reaches the autumnal equinox at 4:44 p.m. Sunday, marking the start of fall in the Northern Hemisphere and spring in the Southern Hemisphere. At the equinox, the Earth is spinning upright relative to the sun -- this only happens twice a year because the Earth's axis is tilted by 23.5 degrees. During our fall and winter, the axis is tilted away from the sun, while during spring and summer the North Pole is tilted toward the sun, giving us more direct sunlight and warmth. (The axis always points the same direction, as the above graphic explains; its orientation relative to the sun just changes as the planet revolves around the sun.)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Earth reaches the autumnal equinox at 4:44 p.m. Sunday, marking the start of fall in the Northern Hemisphere and spring in the Southern Hemisphere. At the equinox, the Earth is spinning upright relative to the sun -- this only happens twice a year because the Earth's axis is tilted by 23.5 degrees. During our fall and winter, the axis is tilted away from the sun, while during spring and summer the North Pole is tilted toward the sun, giving us more direct sunlight and warmth. (The axis always points the same direction, as the above graphic explains; its orientation relative to the sun just changes as the planet revolves around the sun.)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
It has begun to feel like fall, with schools in session and a chill in the air, but the season actually arrives at the moment of autumnal equinox at 10:29 p.m. Monday. At that instant, Earth will be rotating upright on its axis, giving the northern and southern hemispheres equal sunlight and making the length of day and night roughly equal. In Baltimore, the sun will stay up for 12 hours or more until Friday. It's the tilt of the Earth's axis that gives us seasons -- at the winter solstice, the axis is tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun, and at the summer solstice, it's tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun. Meteorological fall started Sept.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance | March 20, 1993
It's 9:41 a.m. March 20. Do you know where your planet is?If your answer is, "At the vernal equinox," Leroy E. Doggett says you're only part right.Raise your hand and shout, "The first day of spring!" and you also win just partial credit from Mr. Doggett, who is chief of the nautical almanac office at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington.The fact is, this equinox business is no simple matter. Nothing is sacred, not even the notion that today marks the first day of spring. In spite of last week's blizzard, for example, the ancient Celts might argue that today marks the middle of spring.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1999
Hoping to stop an alleged pyramid scheme that officials say has bilked about 400 Marylanders out of $2 million, the state's attorney general's office said yesterday that it has joined the federal government and five other states in a lawsuit seeking to halt the company's practices and get back some of the lost money.Equinox International Corp., based in Las Vegas, sells environmentally friendly products such as water filters and skin-care products. The company, which operates in Maryland under the names Infinity Group, World Solutions and Paramount, denied any wrongdoing.
FEATURES
By Mary J. Pitzer and Mary J. Pitzer,Contributing Writer | January 24, 1993
A bit of magic happens at Chichen Itza, Mexico, on the first day of spring.As the sun goes down, seven sunlit triangles appear on the north staircase of the Castillo, the main pyramid in this ancient Mayan city. With a massive stone snake's head illuminated at the bottom of the stairs, the interplay of light and shadow creates the illusion of a serpent that has come alive.It's an eye-catching sight that archaeologists and astronomers believe the Mayas used in ceremonies to mark the vernal equinox.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2005
As dusk fell on Annapolis' Eastport neighborhood, at least 100 residents accompanied by several dogs gathered for a festive spring ritual: taking off their shoes and burning their winter socks, pair by pair, in a small blaze on the waterfront. As several Eastporters explained, the burning of socks signifies a readiness for warm weather - warm enough to wear Docksiders (without socks) for the local pastime, sailing. It's a symbolic embrace of the vernal equinox, some said. Eastport, the offbeat maritime community just across the Spa Creek Bridge from downtown Annapolis, prides itself on a certain rugged character, though it technically lies within the state capital's limits.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
The moon will be full Thursday night, known by most as the "Full Pink Moon. " And it will be marked by a partial lunar eclipse in the eastern hemisphere. For those on the other side of the world, the eclipse could make the moon indeed look somewhat pink. It will pass through the edge of Earth's shadow, but that will occur well before nightfall for the U.S. The moon reaches its "fullest" point at 3:57 p.m. Clear skies are expected to allow it to shine brightly in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
March's full moon arrives Wednesday morning, the first to fall after the vernal equinox. It is the fourth full moon after the winter solstice, something that usually falls in April. This full moon is known by names including Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Growing Moon, Waking Moon and Pink Moon. But if you ask sources like the Farmer's Almanac or Old Farmer's Almanac, it is the Full Worm Moon. In ancient times, the naming of full moons was dependent on where they fell relative to events like the winter solstice or vernal equinox, but modern usage sticks with the same moon name for any given month.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Sunshine is in the forecast again today. Enjoy it while it lasts. Tuesday is the last day of the year with more daylight than darkness -- by about 30 seconds. The sun rose at 6:57 a.m. and will set at about 6:58 p.m., for a total of about 12 hours and 30 seconds of daylight.  But the length of daylight is shrinking by about 2 1/2 minutes every day as we move past the autumnal equinox toward the winter solstice. On Wednesday, the sun will rise a minute later and set about two minutes earlier, with daylight for about two minutes shy of 12 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeremy 'Jay' Trucker and Midnight Sun contributor | September 24, 2012
Seether, Sick Puppies and Charm City Devils performed at Pier Six Pavilion on Saturday night. Midnight Sun contributor Jay Trucker was there. The Autumn Equinox, a 98 Rock-sponsored concert featuring Charm City Devils, Sick Puppies and Seether, may not have sold as many tickets as Sunday night's sold-out banjo-and-acoustic-guitar-dueling kinsmen the Avett Brothers, but fans on hand were treated to an intercontinental array of hard-rock music...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
Summer 2012 will be officially in the books as of 10:49 a.m. Saturday, and it will end with one small taste of summer-like weather before the fall weather we have flirted with sets in further. It won't be as hot as it has been much of the summer, but Saturday is expected to be warmer and more humid than it has been lately. Highs are expected in the low 80s with a 60 percent chance of passing storms in the evening. There is a 15 percent chance that storms could be severe, according to the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 19, 2012
Earth reaches vernal equinox at 1:14 a.m. Tuesday, but the days have been growing longer than nights since Saturday. The equinox, which of course marks the start of spring, is the point at which the Earth's axis is neither tilted toward or away from the sun. In the northern hemisphere, though, daylight and nighttime hours become equal a few days before the equinox. Friday got closest to 12 hours of daylight even, with sunrise at 7:16 a.m. and sunset at 7:15 p.m. This morning, the sun appears at 7:09 a.m. and stays out until 7:19 p.m. Enjoy the 12-plus hours of sunshine today.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 29, 2002
DETROIT - General Motors Corp. will put a six-cylinder engine from China in a planned Chevrolet sport utility vehicle, the automaker's first use of a Chinese-made engine in North America, a Canadian union leader said yesterday. The world's largest automaker will ship the engines from one of its joint ventures in China to Ingersoll, Ontario, where General Motors will build the Equinox SUV starting in 2004, said Canadian Auto Workers President Buzz Hargrove. General Motors spokeswoman Debbie Frakes declined to comment on engine plans for the Equinox.
NEWS
March 17, 2006
Did you know?--The vernal equinox brings spring to the Northern Hemisphere at 1:26 p.m. Monday. -- www.crh.noaa.gov/ind/seasons.txt
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 4, 2009
The moon was full at precisely 2:11 a.m. this morning, but we won't see it until it rises for Baltimore at 6:37 p.m. Out at the beaches, look for the moon to peek above the ocean at 6:32 p.m. And, because it's the full moon closest in time to the autumnal equinox, it's regarded as the Harvest Moon, the one that illuminated the fields as farmers worked late to bring in their crops.
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