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Equatorial Guinea

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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Zimbabwean authorities have threatened to execute 64 men who were on a plane seized Sunday at the airport in Harare, the Zimbabwean capital, calling them mercenaries who were on their way to sow conflict in Equatorial Guinea. The Herald, Zimbabwe's state-owned newspaper, reported that 20 of the men are South Africans, 23 are Angolans, 18 are Namibians, two are Congolese and one is a Zimbabwean with a South African passport. President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo of Equatorial Guinea, which recent oil discoveries have made one of the continent's biggest oil producers, said the group was part of a quest by "enemy powers" to overthrow his government.
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NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,Tribune Newspapers | August 6, 2009
WASHINGTON - -Former Rep. William J. Jefferson, the Louisiana Democrat who gained national attention after federal agents found $90,000 in his freezer, was convicted Wednesday of political corruption. Jefferson, 62, was found guilty in federal court in Alexandria, Va., of 11 of 16 criminal counts, including bribery, racketeering, money laundering and wire fraud. He faces more than 20 years in prison. "We have been reminded today that we are a nation of laws, and not men," said Dana J. Boente, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 8, 2002
MALABO, Equatorial Guinea - The sun hammered down on the crowd of 10,000 people crammed into the soccer stadium for the launch of the president's re-election campaign. It was noon, and the steamy tropical air had come to a boil. Dressed in T-shirts and caps decorated with their leader's face, the spectators looked weary, sweat pouring from their brows, waiting for the president of their tiny African nation to speak. He sat before them in the shade, a waiter by his side refreshing his glass of ice water.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | February 28, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Most Americans won't have heard of Simon Mann and may wonder why they should care that he is being held illegally in one of the world's most notorious prisons, where torture is routine and human rights nonexistent. They might care because that country holding him, Equatorial Guinea, is a major provider of oil to the U.S., and because U.S. companies dominate oil exploration there. They might care because Mr. Mann, a British, Eton-educated former Special Air Service officer - and, some say, a mercenary, who is accused of planning to overthrow Equatorial Guinea's corrupt government - has apparently been abandoned by officials and others who once supported him. All who remain are his wife, Amanda, his seven children, a handful of friends and his attorney.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | February 28, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Most Americans won't have heard of Simon Mann and may wonder why they should care that he is being held illegally in one of the world's most notorious prisons, where torture is routine and human rights nonexistent. They might care because that country holding him, Equatorial Guinea, is a major provider of oil to the U.S., and because U.S. companies dominate oil exploration there. They might care because Mr. Mann, a British, Eton-educated former Special Air Service officer - and, some say, a mercenary, who is accused of planning to overthrow Equatorial Guinea's corrupt government - has apparently been abandoned by officials and others who once supported him. All who remain are his wife, Amanda, his seven children, a handful of friends and his attorney.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
U.S. citizens are urged to keep low profile in Kabul after bombing KABUL, Afghanistan -- In response to a weekend car-bombing that killed 10 people, the U.S. Embassy advised Americans yesterday to limit their movements in the capital, take strict security measures and avoid "potential target areas," such as government offices, military bases and restaurants frequented primarily by foreigners. Investigators are questioning a man detained Sunday at Kabul's airport with traces of explosives on his hands, officials said "There is a suspicion against him, but for now there is no link or proof that he was involved" in the attack, an Interior Ministry spokesman said.
TOPIC
By Cesar Chelala and Cesar Chelala,INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE | August 15, 2004
When oil was found in 1996 in Equatorial Guinea, the former Spanish colony in West Africa was one of the poorest countries in the world. Today, this small and sparsely populated country of 465,000 inhabitants has an offshore production of 350,000 barrels a day, making it the third-largest sub-Saharan producer of oil, behind Nigeria and Angola. According to the African Development Bank, a year after oil was found, gross domestic product went up 76 percent. In my role as a public health consultant, I recently visited Equatorial Guinea for the first time since 1993.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,Tribune Newspapers | August 6, 2009
WASHINGTON - -Former Rep. William J. Jefferson, the Louisiana Democrat who gained national attention after federal agents found $90,000 in his freezer, was convicted Wednesday of political corruption. Jefferson, 62, was found guilty in federal court in Alexandria, Va., of 11 of 16 criminal counts, including bribery, racketeering, money laundering and wire fraud. He faces more than 20 years in prison. "We have been reminded today that we are a nation of laws, and not men," said Dana J. Boente, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | April 14, 2004
THE BRICK HOUSE at 10501 Bit and Spur Lane in Potomac is modest for the neighborhood - only six bathrooms and two fireplaces, according to real estate records. But it has fetched attention beyond its curb appeal because of its owner and manner of financing. The dollars that bought the home, it seems, came from the pockets of American drivers via an impoverished West African country the size of Maryland. President-for-Life Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo of oil-rich Equatorial Guinea bought the place in late 1999 for $1.2 million.
SPORTS
By Sports on TV | July 6, 2011
WEDNESDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS NASCAR Sprint Cup Coke Zero 400 (T) SPEEDNoon MLB Orioles@Texas (T) MASN9:30 a.m. Kansas City@White Sox WGN-A2 Yankees@Cleveland ESPN7 Cubs@Washington MASN7 Orioles@Texas MASN28 Cubs@Washington (T) MASN11:30 Yankees@Cleveland (T) ESPN3 a.m. Cycling Tour de France: Stage 5 VS.7:30 a.m. Tour de France: Stage 5 (T)
NEWS
August 31, 2004
U.S. citizens are urged to keep low profile in Kabul after bombing KABUL, Afghanistan -- In response to a weekend car-bombing that killed 10 people, the U.S. Embassy advised Americans yesterday to limit their movements in the capital, take strict security measures and avoid "potential target areas," such as government offices, military bases and restaurants frequented primarily by foreigners. Investigators are questioning a man detained Sunday at Kabul's airport with traces of explosives on his hands, officials said "There is a suspicion against him, but for now there is no link or proof that he was involved" in the attack, an Interior Ministry spokesman said.
TOPIC
By Cesar Chelala and Cesar Chelala,INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE | August 15, 2004
When oil was found in 1996 in Equatorial Guinea, the former Spanish colony in West Africa was one of the poorest countries in the world. Today, this small and sparsely populated country of 465,000 inhabitants has an offshore production of 350,000 barrels a day, making it the third-largest sub-Saharan producer of oil, behind Nigeria and Angola. According to the African Development Bank, a year after oil was found, gross domestic product went up 76 percent. In my role as a public health consultant, I recently visited Equatorial Guinea for the first time since 1993.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | April 14, 2004
THE BRICK HOUSE at 10501 Bit and Spur Lane in Potomac is modest for the neighborhood - only six bathrooms and two fireplaces, according to real estate records. But it has fetched attention beyond its curb appeal because of its owner and manner of financing. The dollars that bought the home, it seems, came from the pockets of American drivers via an impoverished West African country the size of Maryland. President-for-Life Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo of oil-rich Equatorial Guinea bought the place in late 1999 for $1.2 million.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Zimbabwean authorities have threatened to execute 64 men who were on a plane seized Sunday at the airport in Harare, the Zimbabwean capital, calling them mercenaries who were on their way to sow conflict in Equatorial Guinea. The Herald, Zimbabwe's state-owned newspaper, reported that 20 of the men are South Africans, 23 are Angolans, 18 are Namibians, two are Congolese and one is a Zimbabwean with a South African passport. President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo of Equatorial Guinea, which recent oil discoveries have made one of the continent's biggest oil producers, said the group was part of a quest by "enemy powers" to overthrow his government.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 8, 2002
MALABO, Equatorial Guinea - The sun hammered down on the crowd of 10,000 people crammed into the soccer stadium for the launch of the president's re-election campaign. It was noon, and the steamy tropical air had come to a boil. Dressed in T-shirts and caps decorated with their leader's face, the spectators looked weary, sweat pouring from their brows, waiting for the president of their tiny African nation to speak. He sat before them in the shade, a waiter by his side refreshing his glass of ice water.
NEWS
December 9, 2002
AS FOREIGN countries go, the Democratic Republic of Sao Tome and Principe is not exactly a household word. Better take your maps out. The five tiny islands off the coast of West Africa are steadily edging toward an alliance with the United States. If it's consummated, it will be a marriage of convenience. The United States wants to lessen reliance on Middle Eastern fuel; Sao Tome has huge unexploited oil deposits. Sao Tome, for its part, wants protection against Nigeria, which already covets an oil-rich territory belonging to another neighbor, Cameroon.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 5, 1996
HATTIESBURG, Miss. -- Some will run with Nike on their chest. When the greatest distance runners in the world cross the finish line in the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, television cameras will record not only the pure joy and intense agony of their effort but also the brand of their corporate sponsor.It will be much the same -- but not quite -- when Henry Moyo and John Mwathiwa, distance runners from the impoverished African nation of Malawi, cross the finish line.On their backs they will carry the hopes and dreams of their nation.
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