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By Jose Felipe Anderson | August 30, 2000
ELDRICK "Tiger" Woods has set the standard for excellence that has resulted in a diverse following of multi-colored youth rushing to the nation's public golf courses, just as Tiger had done during the 1970s and 1980s. He ultimately became the top money winner in the history of the Professional Golf Association. Yet it was barely four decades ago that PGA of America demonstrated the worst of American sportsmanship with its whites-only participation policy. The "Caucasian only" clause was not removed from the organization's official bylaws until 1961, permitting the legendary cigar smoking Charlie Sifford to join its ranks as the first African-American member.
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NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | July 6, 2014
As the holiday weekend draws to a close, please pause from the cookouts and fireworks to reflect on the meaning of this freedom we've been celebrating, knowingly or not. When 50 years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964, he placed it in the context of "a long struggle for freedom" that began when the Founding Fathers adopted the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. "They pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor, not only to found a nation, but to forge an ideal of freedom; not only for political independence, but for personal liberty; not only to eliminate foreign rule, but to establish the rule of justice in the affairs of men. " Now, we know that the noble ideal of 1776 did not really embrace blacks, women, Native Americans or whites without property.
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NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | February 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Justice Department is proposing regulations to spell out steps that businesses such as restaurants, stores and theaters would have to take to comply with the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act.The rules would require businesses that function as public accommodations to remove barriers in existing facilities and make other reasonable changes to give disabled persons equal access.Stricter standards, requiring a "high degree of convenient access" for the disabled, would be imposed for facilities being altered and buildings that open after Jan. 26, 1993.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | May 15, 2014
Among my fellow liberals this is not a popular view: Brown v. Board, the historic Supreme Court decision of May 1954, has had negative consequences as well as positive. The unanimous decision of the court was intended to ensure that black students would have equal access to public schools and a far better education than they were getting. It was obvious that separate was far from equal. White schools had better teachers, better facilities and better-performing students. If black children were able to sit side by side with white students, it was thought, the black children would learn more.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Sun National Staff | October 12, 2000
WASHINGTON The state of Alabama mounted a sweeping challenge yesterday to Congress constitutional power to pass laws to protect the disabled from discrimination, stirring sharp skepticism from some Supreme Court justices. By the end of a one-hour, deeply probing review of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the court appeared to be divided on Congress authority to force equal access for disabled people to an array of state and local government services. The Alabama case is the latest in a lengthening series of cases that, up to now, have produced Supreme Court rulings paring down Congress legislative authority, when federal laws intrude into areas the states normally oversee.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
I am writing as a pastor to express my support for Question 6, which allows gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people to be married in Maryland. Biblical scholar John Dominic Crossan explains that the concept of justice in the Bible is not punitive but distributive. Justice is not about punishment but about making sure everyone on earth gets a fair share. No one should be left out. No one short changed. Everyone should have equal access to food, shelter and clothing for sure.
NEWS
March 20, 2009
Courageous stand for gay marriage I was very pleased to read of former Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest's testimony in Annapolis in support of same-sex civil marriage ("Support for gay marriage," March 13). Mr. Gilchrest, unlike most in his party, "gets it" when it comes to the injustice inherent in denying one group of citizens access to rights accorded other citizens. He understands that the issue of same-sex civil marriage has nothing to do with religion, that no church can be, or would be, compelled to sanctify a marriage that violates that congregation's tenets.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | February 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Justice Department proposed yesterday regulations outlining steps that businesses such as restaurants, stores and theaters would have to take to comply with the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act.The rules would require businesses that function as public accommodations to remove barriers in existing facilities and make other reasonable changes to give disabled people equal access.Stricter standards, requiring a "high degree of convenient access" for the disabled, would be imposed for facilities being altered and buildings that open after Jan. 26, 1993.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | May 15, 2014
Among my fellow liberals this is not a popular view: Brown v. Board, the historic Supreme Court decision of May 1954, has had negative consequences as well as positive. The unanimous decision of the court was intended to ensure that black students would have equal access to public schools and a far better education than they were getting. It was obvious that separate was far from equal. White schools had better teachers, better facilities and better-performing students. If black children were able to sit side by side with white students, it was thought, the black children would learn more.
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 24, 1995
A federal commission studying the slow progress of women and minorities in the workplace says breaking the so-called glass ceiling is an economic priority that the nation can no longer afford to ignore.The 4-year-old Glass Commission, which went out of business at midnight Tuesday as it completed its work, also urged the federal government to strengthen anti-discrimination laws and increase efforts to eliminate internal barriers to the advancement of minorities and women.The commission also advised American firms to actively support affirmative action and diversity programs.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | December 20, 2012
Youth sports Ex-Terp Darryl Hill starts Kids Play USA Darryl Hill , who in 1963 became the first black football player at Maryland and in the Atlantic Coast Conference, this week announced the formation of his nonprofit organization, Kids Play USA, which aims to eliminate economic discrimination in youth sports so that all children have an opportunity to play for any organized youth or school team. Kids Play USA looks to raise awareness of the importance and benefits of youth sports, and to make them more affordable and accessible to children of the less fortunate.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
Given the heated controversies over potential restrictions on voters' access to the polls during this year's presidential election, now is no time to back off on the legal protections that guarantee one of a democracy's most fundamental rights. Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a challenge to a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that protects minorities' access to the polls. The law is one of the signature legacies of the civil rights era, and experience has shown it is still needed.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
I am writing as a pastor to express my support for Question 6, which allows gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people to be married in Maryland. Biblical scholar John Dominic Crossan explains that the concept of justice in the Bible is not punitive but distributive. Justice is not about punishment but about making sure everyone on earth gets a fair share. No one should be left out. No one short changed. Everyone should have equal access to food, shelter and clothing for sure.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's bill to legalize same-sex marriage quickly won approval in the Maryland Senate Thursday night. The measure now needs the governor's signature. Cheers erupted in the Senate chambers after the 25-22 vote was read out loud and the group of seven gay and lesbian lawmakers from the House of Delegates rushed to the middle of the floor to embrace supportive senators. "I think I'm speechless," said Sen. Richard Madaleno, the only openly gay senator. "This is a remarkable day. " O'Malley, a Democrat, shook hands with activists after the vote.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Maryland's courts sometimes fail to properly serve those with limited-English skills, according to legal advocates and public officials, despite federal laws requiring them to do so and a national push to ensure equal access to the country's courts. About two months ago, Flor Giusti, head of a local group that helps Latino women who are the victims of domestic violence, accompanied a woman to a Baltimore County court to extend a temporary protection order against her partner. Lacking a Spanish interpreter that day, the judge asked the woman questions directly.
NEWS
March 20, 2009
Courageous stand for gay marriage I was very pleased to read of former Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest's testimony in Annapolis in support of same-sex civil marriage ("Support for gay marriage," March 13). Mr. Gilchrest, unlike most in his party, "gets it" when it comes to the injustice inherent in denying one group of citizens access to rights accorded other citizens. He understands that the issue of same-sex civil marriage has nothing to do with religion, that no church can be, or would be, compelled to sanctify a marriage that violates that congregation's tenets.
NEWS
March 3, 1998
Neo-Nazism column was anti-GermanI would like to comment on the Feb. 15 Perspective section column by Martin A. Lee, "Neo-Nazism on rise."I was born and raised in Germany and am Jewish, and agree that neo-Nazism within the German army is worrying. So do most Germans. You can't pick up a German newspaper or magazine without reading about how to solve this problem.But I take exception to the discussion of the organizations representing the "Vertriebenen" -- Germans illegally expelled from lands they had called home for more than 700 years.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
For eight months last year the grocery carts at the Valu Food Supermarket in the Harper's Choice Village Center vanished in record numbers.Store manager Fran Gier estimated that 40 of the store's 102 carts (which cost $110 each) were stolen. Suspected culprits: neighborhood kids using them for fun and nearby apartment dwellers looking for handy laundry carriers.Finally, Mr. Gier came up with a solution: a padlock was placed on a gate that allows wheelchairs through a barrier in front of the store.
NEWS
April 15, 2008
It's a long-held political truism that a legislative body can inflict its worst damage on its citizenry near the close of a session, when passions are high and legislators' attention is scattered toward the twin goals of getting bills passed and getting the heck out of town. In keeping with that time-honored tradition, the Maryland General Assembly waited until the end of its session last week to pass a bill that has the potential to wreak havoc on high school athletics. Under the name "Fitness and Athletics Equity for Students with Disabilities," the seemingly innocuous bill passed unanimously.
SPORTS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2008
Amid its flurry of final-day action, the General Assembly unanimously approved a bill requiring schools to provide disabled students access to sports programs, either among themselves or with able-bodied students. Under the measure known as the Fitness and Athletics Equity for Students with Disabilities, schools have three years to fully implement the requirements. "Once this bill is passed, you can't take it away," said Tatyana McFadden, an Atholton wheelchair athlete who testified at hearings last month in Annapolis.
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