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ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 22, 1998
Color printers have come a long way since my slow, noisy and prone-to-overheat dot-matrix, the one that used a multicolored ribbon.Today's offerings produce color printouts that not only rival but are superior to color photographs.Take Epson's newest Stylus Photo EX inkjet printer. Start with its extremely high 1,440 dots-per-inch ability. Epson uses a micro piezo, or pressure-delivery, system of the ink as opposed to the more popular inkjet thermal method. According to Epson, this allows the printer to deliver the finer 1,440 resolution.
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BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 20, 2007
It's no secret that many printers are sold as loss leaders. A manufacturer can give away great hardware if he can sell the ink at $35 a cartridge and paper for 25 cents a snapshot. That's where the profit is today. Given that business model, I've always been suspicious of printers equipped to print photos directly from a camera's memory card without going through a computer. For me, editing photos is the whole point of digital photography. A perfect shot is rare. With a computer you get a chance to adjust the exposure, crop the image, lighten the shadows, eliminate red-eye and smooth out the occasional wrinkle.
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BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 17, 1992
For some, the dot-matrix printer is a relic from the Stone Age of personal computing.For others, it is an office workhorse, hammering out multi-part invoices, checks and a wide assortment of other forms or simply churning out the latest spreadsheet, database and word processing files.Whatever your need, Epson America, (800) 922-8911, has a new pair of dot-matrix printers that bring a little innovation to an old-fashioned device.The 24-pin Epson Action Printer 3250 ($299) and its nine-pin sibling, the 2250 ($199)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington | July 15, 2004
Xpower Inverter 175 lets your car be your source of electricity I like to use my car as an office, and having access to a laptop or being able to recharge a cellular phone is critical to making sure my day goes smoothly. That's why a device that converts electricity from the cigarette lighter in my car for use by my laptop is terribly valuable. Xantrex has an excellent 175 watt DC-to-AC inverter for all manner of uses. The Xpower Micro Inverter 175 ($45) can make life much easier, especially if you're driving somewhere and shooting images with a digital camera that has a proprietary battery that needs to be recharged.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington and Kevin E. Washington,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
Many of the scanners that I've reviewed have been in the $200 to $400 range because I had never found good quality and features in less expensive scanners - until now. The Epson Perfection 1670 Photo Scanner ($129) awes with its simplicity of use and high quality output. In other words, it works better than some other manufacturer's $300 scanners from a year ago. The Perfection 1670 will handle the more mundane tasks of black and white copying, but its specialty is photo work. The scanner is capable of a 1,600 dots per inch scan; image quality from photos that I scanned was pretty good.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | July 11, 2002
Epson Perfection photo scanner does sharp, detailed work Epson's reputation for scanners remains rock solid, with the introduction of the Epson Perfection 2450 Photo color scanner ($370). It reproduces awesome detail from prints and film, thanks to its 2,400-by-4,800 dot-per-inch resolution. The scanner, which works with Windows 98 or later and Mac OS 8.5 or later, has a transparency adapter big enough for a 4-by-9-inch piece of film. The platen will handle an 8.5-by-11.7-inch photograph or sheet of paper as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2000
Compressed air sends Spin Master truck into all-terrain action No gasoline, no battery or no propellant generally mean a youngster's high-tech toy-on-wheels is a no-go. For the Aftershock monster truck, though, it's no problem. Spin Master Toys' latest land-roaming plaything runs on the cleanest, cheapest stuff around: compressed air. The fuel is pure; the idea, pure genius. The truck has a 0.046-cubic-inch, single-cylinder engine. Filling up its air chamber takes about 30 repetitions with the onboard pump, whose handle doubles as the vehicle's rear bumper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | March 13, 2003
Epson scanner adeptly captures details in photos The Epson Perfection 3200 ($400) has replaced the 2450 in Epson's photo scanner lineup and gives a good account of itself. More for the tech-savvy photo enthusiast than the average person trying to digitize photographs and documents, the 3200 provides really good scans of flat documents and film and transparencies. The biggest part of its winning performance is the huge 3,200-by-6,400 dot-per-inch resolution. The 3200's film scanning won't match a dedicated film scanner's work, but it beats most consumer oriented flat-bed scanners hands down, when it comes to film and transparencies.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | March 10, 1997
JUST A FEW years ago it was far easier to create a color digital image on a screen than to get it onto paper. Color printers capable of high-quality output weighed many pounds, occupied sizable spaces and cost thousands of dollars. Their output was rarely confused with photographic prints.The improvements of the last three years have been remarkable. Color ink-jet printers costing less than $500 now routinely produce pages that can be hard to tell from traditional photographs.The new Stylus Color 800 printer from Epson America Inc. takes photo-quality printing a step beyond its predecessors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1999
Epson's PhotoPC 800 takes sharp photos, saves audio messagesEpson's PhotoPC 800 ($699) is a major new contender in the world of digital photography. It's loaded with remarkable features and takes absolutely gorgeous pictures.The 2-megapixel camera offers three user modes, with fully automatic point-and-shoot capability for beginners and increasing levels of control for intermediate and expert shutterbugs. It even has a built-in microphone, so you can amend the adage to read: "A picture is worth a thousand words ... plus a 10-second voice message."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington and Kevin E. Washington,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
Many of the scanners that I've reviewed have been in the $200 to $400 range because I had never found good quality and features in less expensive scanners - until now. The Epson Perfection 1670 Photo Scanner ($129) awes with its simplicity of use and high quality output. In other words, it works better than some other manufacturer's $300 scanners from a year ago. The Perfection 1670 will handle the more mundane tasks of black and white copying, but its specialty is photo work. The scanner is capable of a 1,600 dots per inch scan; image quality from photos that I scanned was pretty good.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | September 5, 2002
Lexmark International has been the king of inexpensive printers for the past few years. But with the Z65 Color Jetprinter ($180), Lexmark has gone upscale - with mixed results. The Z65 has a few things going for it. It easily connects to your computer via a Universal Serial Bus cable (which is not included). It can produce prints with resolutions up to 4,800-by- 1,200 dots per inch on glossy paper and 4,800-by-600 dpi on plain paper. It produced solid black-and-white documents in draft mode at 10 to 12 pages per minute in our tests - good performance for an inkjet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | July 11, 2002
Epson Perfection photo scanner does sharp, detailed work Epson's reputation for scanners remains rock solid, with the introduction of the Epson Perfection 2450 Photo color scanner ($370). It reproduces awesome detail from prints and film, thanks to its 2,400-by-4,800 dot-per-inch resolution. The scanner, which works with Windows 98 or later and Mac OS 8.5 or later, has a transparency adapter big enough for a 4-by-9-inch piece of film. The platen will handle an 8.5-by-11.7-inch photograph or sheet of paper as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | April 25, 2002
Nice photos, price make Epson printer picture-perfect choice At $200, the Epson Stylus Photo 785EPX competes well against more expensive inkjet printers. This six-color photo printer, which offers 2,800-by-720 dpi resolution, can produce borderless prints that Epson says will last upward of 25 years if you use archive-quality ink. More a photo printer than a text printer, the 785EPX produces sharp, color-rich pictures in sizes up to 8-by-10 inches. It uses Epson's proprietary Micro Piezo print head with Variable Sized Droplet Technology to create pictures that are nearly indistinguishable from a photo finisher's prints.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2001
Photo scanner helps shutterbugs digitize old pictures Go dig those old film negatives out of the attic. With Epson's Perfection 1640SU photo scanner, you'll get sharp, clear reproductions of film transparencies, negatives and prints, with very little fuss. This is the quintessential desktop scanner - sporting a resolution of 1,600 x 3,200 dpi - but it costs some bucks. Its $369 list price includes the film transparency adapter. If you shop around the Internet, (www.amazon.com, www.mysimon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2000
Compressed air sends Spin Master truck into all-terrain action No gasoline, no battery or no propellant generally mean a youngster's high-tech toy-on-wheels is a no-go. For the Aftershock monster truck, though, it's no problem. Spin Master Toys' latest land-roaming plaything runs on the cleanest, cheapest stuff around: compressed air. The fuel is pure; the idea, pure genius. The truck has a 0.046-cubic-inch, single-cylinder engine. Filling up its air chamber takes about 30 repetitions with the onboard pump, whose handle doubles as the vehicle's rear bumper.
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