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Epithets

NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
With Perry Hall High School officials scrambling to recall yearbooks containing a racial epithet, the custodians who were first to arrive at school yesterday discovered the same epithet spray-painted on the school sidewalk. The epithet "is just a word," read the letters in red spray paint near the west entrance of the school, a police report said. The words were accompanied by a symbol representing anarchy and white supremacy, the report said. Baltimore County police are investigating the incident as a racially motivated crime, said Officer Shawn Vinson, a Police Department spokesman.
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NEWS
By Bill McCauley and Sara Neufeld and Bill McCauley and Sara Neufeld,Sun Staff | June 3, 2004
Someone painted a racial epithet on the sidewalk at one of the entrances to Perry Hall High overnight, one day after school officials began collecting yearbooks so the same word could be removed from one of its pages. "I think someone just wanted to make some trouble," Charles A. Herndon, the Baltimore County school system's spokesman, said this morning. The perpetrators "may have been goaded" by the incident with the yearbooks, he said. A school custodian discovered the word and the symbol for anarchy, an A with a circle around it, spray-painted on a side entrance to the school early this morning.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
Perry Hall High School officials are recalling about 450 yearbooks that were distributed to seniors before the officials discovered that a racial epithet had been inserted next to the name of a biracial student. The slur appears to have been inserted as a prank, Baltimore County school officials said. Still, officials plan to send the yearbooks back to the publisher, where the offending page will be removed. Seniors will get their copies back, so autographs and personal notes will not be lost.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
A sexton who was arrested in September on suspicion of loitering outside the Baltimore church where he works has filed a $5.5 million suit against two city police officers, accusing them of yelling a racial epithet, intentionally using excessive force, and falsely arresting and imprisoning him.The suit, filed Friday in Baltimore Circuit Court, alleges that Central District Agent Brian M. Fockler and Officer Georgios S. Giannakoulias acted without probable cause...
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
Anne Arundel County activists plan to publicly denounce on Monday "a climate of insensitivity and intolerance" that members of the Anne Arundel County Council have fostered, an Annapolis civil rights leader wrote Saturday. "We have seen racially insensitive comments made by some members of the County Council and now is the time to publicly express our dissatisfaction," wrote Carl O. Snowden, director of the state attorney general's Office of Civil Rights, in an email to activists.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
An off-duty Baltimore police officer who called 911 after being struck in an eye with a glass beer mug calmly but urgently requested backup as men hurled racial epithets and threatened to hang him, according to a copy of the tape obtained by The Baltimore Sun. A Harford County district judge lifted the $1 million bond set by a court commissioner and ordered Friday that the Joppa man accused of striking Detective Jermaine Cook be held without bond....
BUSINESS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Texaco Inc. announced yesterday a sweeping plan to open doors for minorities and women, winning praise from civil rights leaders.The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson called off a consumer boycott of Texaco, and NAACP President Kweisi Mfume shelved a threatened stock divestiture campaign.Texaco pledged to boost minority employment, reward managers for achieving workplace diversity, triple the number of blacks who own retail outlets and increase purchasing from businesses owned by minorities and women.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 28, 1998
JASPER, Texas -- Despite fears of violence, a showdown between white supremacists and black militants remained relatively peaceful here yesterday on Jasper's courthouse square, leaving residents feeling relieved.Name-calling and threats were as bad as it got on a sweltering day in this East Texas town where a 49-year-old black man, James Byrd Jr., was dragged to death behind a pickup truck three weeks ago."It's wrong for either of them to be here," Joyce Edmond, a black woman, said of the two groups.
NEWS
By RICHARD A. SERRANO | May 5, 2006
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- For all his taunts, jeers and bombast, Zacarias Moussaoui did not get the last word. When he was formally sentenced yesterday for his role as a Sept. 11 conspirator, U.S. District Judge Leonie M. Brinkema had the final say. And she did it with a touch of poetry. "You came here to be a martyr, and to die in a great big bang of glory," the judge told him. "But to paraphrase the poet T.S. Eliot, instead you will die with a whimper. The rest of your life you will spend in prison."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
One of the five candidates for Howard County school board is raising an issue that's making the other four uncomfortable: race.At a recent NAACP candidate forum, Vincent Pugliese, a retired Montgomery County teacher who lives in Columbia, repeatedly used a highly charged racial epithet in regard to blacks while relating anecdotes decrying racism.Mr. Pugliese also has declared that he would like to do away with the schools' Black History Month, which he says stresses ethnic differences rather than unity.
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