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Epithets

NEWS
By Charleston (W.Va.) Gazette | November 18, 1991
DO AMERICANS have a right to utter slurs and epithets abou another person's race, sex, religion, sexual orientation, disability ethnic origin? Yes, U.S. Judge Robert W. Warren ruled, throwing out a "speech code" adopted by the University of nTC Wisconsin. The code penalized students whose language created a "hostile learning environment" for other students. The code was challenged by a campus newspaper, aided by the American Civil Liberties Union.The university, one of several with similar codes, felt its restraints were legal under the "fighting-words doctrine."
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NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2004
Two McDaniel College students who were involved in a campus brawl with racial overtones asked a Carroll County Circuit Court judge yesterday for separate trials, with one student saying that the inflammatory nature of the slurs that precipitated the event would reflect unfairly on him. Defense attorney Paul Kemp told Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. that there was no evidence that his client, Thomas E. "Scoots" Crowell, 24, of Brinklow in Montgomery County, uttered...
NEWS
By Russ Mullaly | February 5, 1992
I've got a few beefs that have really got me burned lately.They are: continuing racism in the county, intolerance under the guise of religion and legislators who don't know how to legislate.It seems like almost every week, there is one reported case of racism here in the county. I wonder how many are not reported out of fear of reprisal. We've got the skinheads still distributing hate newspapers in Columbia because they don't like the fact that Columbia is integrated.There are also a growing number of racial incidents occurring predominantly in the western part of the county.
NEWS
August 3, 1997
Editorial on racial epithets called disserviceI am the lawyer for Cory Lee LaFon, referred to in your editorial of July 24, "Writing a Wrong." Contrary to your editorial comment, I did not say that Cory Lee LaFon "did not understand the meaning of the racial epithets."Such a statement would obviously be absurd. I did inform the court that in speaking with my client, I came to understand that he, like many young people two generations removed from World War II, fail to appreciate how hateful a swastika symbol is. I ratified in open court our collective, appropriate repugnance at the ideas of racial and religious bigotry.
NEWS
By Carol F. Rosenberg | December 31, 1990
THE YEAR 1990 had big ups and downsCausing minimal laughter and maximal frowns.Communist leaders no longer infestEastern Europe. They pulled out at Gorby's request.The Berlin Wall finally met its demiseAnd Gorbachev landed the Nobel Prize.While landsmen of his were pulling their belts inMasses of Russians voted for Yeltsin.England and France are by tunnel connected.Thatcher resigned, Mason then was selected.Nicaraguan results, to Ortega's sorrow,Gave that election to Mrs. Chamorro.Mandela at long last from prison is free.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 27, 1993
Boston.--Now, at long last, we can return the water buffalo to the political menagerie. This beast of burden has been working overtime. It's carried the heavy weight of arguments about racial harassment, free speech and political correctness for five solid months. Give it a rest.In case you missed the incident, it began January 13 on the University of Pennsylvania campus when a group of African-American sorority sisters, in high spirits and high volume, disturbed some other students' peace.
NEWS
By Richard Rabicoff | December 18, 1990
TRAGEDY STRIKES AT THE BREEDER'S CUP HORSE RACE! DETAILS AT ELEVEN.""Oh, My God," thought I, immediately imagining the worst.Had a grandstand collapsed, with thousands plunging to their deaths? Had a tornado swept the arena, or a fire? Perhaps a jockey had tumbled to the turf, trampled by 20 thundering hooves. Or some disgruntled bettor had gone berserk and opened fire on spectators. Maybe Iraqi terrorists had blown up the place.When I hear the word tragedy, I instinctively think the worst.
NEWS
By Michel Marriott and Michel Marriott,New York Times News Service | January 24, 1993
One of America's oldest and most searing epithets -- "nigger -- is flooding into the nation's popular culture, giving rise to a bitter debate among blacks about its historically ugly power and its increasingly open use in an integrated society.Whether thoughtlessly or by design, large numbers of a post-civil rights generation of blacks have turned to a conspicuous use of "nigger" just as they have gained considerable cultural influence through rap music and related genres.Some blacks, mostly young people, argue that their open use of the word will eventually demystify it, strip it of its racist meaning.
NEWS
By Erin Aubry Kaplan and Erin Aubry Kaplan,Los Angeles Times | April 15, 2007
The N Word Who Can Say It, Who Shouldn't, and Why By Jabari Asim Houghton Mifflin / 278 pages / $26 What's in a word? When it comes to the N-word, the better question is, what isn't? Whatever one thinks of its usage, the granddaddy of ethnic slurs is much more than a stick or stone that can be deflected with self-esteem and forgotten until the next encounter. The word is not singular and never has been. It is a social orientation, a state of mind so deeply embedded in the collective American unconscious - and the conscious - it's not perceived as a problem; it's part of who we are. It is a 400-year-old storm front that has never blown over, a forked tongue of lightning that can crash overhead without warning or welcome, breaking the fragile continuum of American conversations about race.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 30, 1995
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- To learn what Latin Americans think about each other, listen to the chants at soccer stadiums around South America.At the recent America Cup tournament in Uruguay, Argentine fans belittled their Chilean counterparts as "sons of Pinochet" (translation: Chile is full of militarists).In a match against Bolivia, Chilean fans yelled that no country with a standard of living equal to Uganda could beat them.And finally, when Uruguay took the championship here, thousands of Uruguayans took to the streets to celebrate their victory not by mocking Brazil, the closest contender, but by shouting their joy at having humiliated the continent's most prideful nation, Argentina.
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